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Walleye


lawle102

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Im still new to the walleye game (roughly 2-3 years) and I was wondering if anyone has some techniques for me to try. I have used dixie spinners, wally divers at all depths and colors. I have tried the bottom bouncers with worm harnesses, and I have even tried using a syringe to pump air into the worm , which helps keep it off the bottom. I have been fairly successful so far, my biggest walleye being 9lbs 8 oz, but i am still looking for new techniques. Thanks for any help guys.

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I am fishing in the Black river, where it meets lake ontario. But I also fish elsewhere for them. The hard part is the water temp and color. It changes so fast depending on the current from the river and it can wash out into Black River Bay so fast that within a day the water can go from warm and clear water to a muddy slightly cooler water. And it throws me off and trying to keep up with everything is tough.

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The Black has huge fish that can be caught at night in the fall casting stickbaits like rattling rougues or thundersticks from the bank. Can't help you with trolling in the river although in the spring I have heard there is good fishing off the points near the mouth with crankbaits and spinner-worm harnesses.

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When the water goes muddy go with Chartruese,and oranges. I have a stud spoon I use in close when the water is all turned up and it flat out performs. Dreamweaver has some very good dirty water colors. Dirty water=bright colors,clear water=natural colors. If the water temp is colder try trolling a little bit slower 1.8-2.0. I like 2.2-2.4 in summer.

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They work, but they don't spin as freely as standard clevises. How big is your boat? I know the walleye in your area head out into the main lake as the summer progresses. Out near the islands towards the St. Lawrence river entrance the fish suspend.

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Walleye Insider Magazine his month has an article about using in-line planer boards for use in near shore waters, The difference is all the lines are on one side of the boat to put the lures on specific structure that has been located earlier. When a fish is on, the other poles are shifted to the other side of the boat to bring in the fish. This should be great for early spring fishing on the "Big O".

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