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Attaching Swivels to wire


JimB

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Managed to break my new wire line on my dipsy pole.   Don't ask, it was ugly.

 

Question is, it came with a swivel factory crimped to the line.   Not sure if any tackle stores/hardware stores sell crimps that small?

 

If re crimping is out, any one know how to tie wire line?   I've looked at youtube, and there are vids for splicing mono to wire, but nothing I saw about

attaching terminal hardware.....

 

Not sure if a Haywire knot is what I'm looking for?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Jim

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JB  

 

                make a loop in the wire and put it on the swivel, put the loop over the swivel

and tie an overhand knot, pull tight and trim.  crimps are not too kind to wire, including

downrigger wire.

 

                                                   john

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The diameter of the wire is a factor in your decision if it is normal 30 lb 7 strand  you can tie it but if it is much thicker diameter you will find tying difficult to impossible depending on just how thick it is. I use crimps despite all the comments on here about breakage etc. I've been doing it for well over40 years without any substantial problems but usually on wire heavier than 30lb. My current wire rigs (7 strand 30 lb) are crimped and then I hot glued over the terminal connection with clear hot glue so I can still see inside to inspect for potential breakage....thus far no problems. This prevents fraying of the wire at the terminus as well as limiting the potential "wiggle" at the terminus potentially creating a bend or break. I haven't ordered crimps in a long time but Jann"s Tackle used to have them in various sizes. I've always used the single wire crimp just a slight bit larger than the wire diameter but there are also double wire crimps that allow you to separate the wire from itself. I think it is primarily a preference issue. When I crimp I crimp it in the center with a couple or three depressions but not too hard to compromise the wire and don't crimp on the very ends of the crimp  so that the wire has a little freedom but doesn't work against the edge of the crimp itself which can cause breakage. Hope that helps....I know many folks may have very different ideas about it but it has worked for me for so long I don't even question it any longer.

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I will also throw my support for the knot posted at LOTSA and the Ernie Lantiegne (aka Fish Doctor) video. It looks a little ugly, but it's super strong and easy to tie even out on the water. Works very well with both 7 and 19 strand wire.

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Nothin but the best for you guys haha. I was on business travel when I made it, so I had to use what I had handy! Looking back at it, using oversized props probably made it easier to see and understand :)

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Hey Nick I'll bet you really impressed them at the meeting the next day with your watch dangling from your tie :lol:  Couldn't resist it.....

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  • 5 weeks later...

A quick question just out of curiosity...  all of the posts and the photos/videos basically describe the same knot - a doubled line overhand knot that creates a loop. All of the posts have feeding the loop through the swivel, then the swivel through the loop before tying the overhand knot.  I've used various loop knots to attach terminal tackle for years with monofilament line, always tying the loop knot (surgeons knot, perfection loop, or dropper loop) first, then running it through the tackle eye, then the tackle through the loop, creating the double half-hitch that actually holds the terminal tackle. So what I'm wondering is why can't the overhand knot be tied first? is it simply a preference thing, or does it really make a difference when working with wire as opposed to mono? I could see it becoming more of a factor if tying on something big that would require a huge loop, but swivels, with or without snaps, are small enough that loop size can be small to begin with.

Is there something about wire that makes the order more important?

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A quick question just out of curiosity...  all of the posts and the photos/videos basically describe the same knot - a doubled line overhand knot that creates a loop. All of the posts have feeding the loop through the swivel, then the swivel through the loop before tying the overhand knot.  I've used various loop knots to attach terminal tackle for years with monofilament line, always tying the loop knot (surgeons knot, perfection loop, or dropper loop) first, then running it through the tackle eye, then the tackle through the loop, creating the double half-hitch that actually holds the terminal tackle. So what I'm wondering is why can't the overhand knot be tied first? is it simply a preference thing, or does it really make a difference when working with wire as opposed to mono? I could see it becoming more of a factor if tying on something big that would require a huge loop, but swivels, with or without snaps, are small enough that loop size can be small to begin with.

Is there something about wire that makes the order more important?

 

It can be done as you describe and it's actually easier if you do the overhand knot first.  I have been doing it that way for several years now, and I was the one that took the step by step photos for the post on the LOTSA Page.

 

Tim

Edited by Tim Bromund
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