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Cayuga seneca or owasco


sammyslayer

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Looking for any info as to where the best fishing is right now. The salmon have slowed down on the big lake and I'm not ready to put the boat away. I have fished all the fingerlakes and have plenty of gear. Just want the best action. Looking for mainly landlocks and rainbows.

Sent from my VS910 4G using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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We are having good catches of lamprey eels lately on Cayuga. The only tackle you need is a set of downriggers and weights. Dragging a real fish isn't necessary but may increase your numbers. They will hit 12 lb.  sharks also, black or silver.  Best action is 60' to 100' down over 100' to 200' bottom. :rofl:  :rofl:

 

 

post-139511-0-76249100-1379009408_thumb.jpg

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To answer your question Sammyslayer I would take my chances with Seneca right now ... although fishing hasn't been all that easy there either. The wind and weather in general seems to have raised hell with the fishing all over.

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I would say Owasco.

It is a Lamprey free lake. It is plenty deep and best, it is small enough to go to either the north end when there is heavy northern wind making the south end unfishable or go to the south end when there is southern wind. I have caught pike,browns and lake trout on the southern end when there is a good southern wind sucking that cold water right up to the weed beds.

There is a launch on both the north end and the south end so just check the wind direction and choose your launch site accordingly. The distance between the 2 launches is about 14 miles.

Just make very sure that your boat and bilge are clean. As a cottage owner I have a big interest in keeping the quagga mussle and the lamprey out of our lake

Edited by rolmops
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Stinger, those things are the reason I avoid cayuga. I have seen some monster atlantics cruisin the surface early in the spring and have seen fish tear lighter tackle up, but hate lampreys. Seneca is not that bad for lampreys and had decent success there a morning in August. Owasco was super tough this year before walleye opened. A buddy of mine tried it a month ago and was skunked. Soo unless someone can provide a decent report for owasco I am leaning towards seneca.

Sent from my VS910 4G using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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We are having good catches of lamprey eels lately on Cayuga. The only tackle you need is a set of downriggers and weights. Dragging a real fish isn't necessary but may increase your numbers. They will hit 12 lb.  sharks also, black or silver.  Best action is 60' to 100' down over 100' to 200' bottom. :rofl:  :rofl:

That pic shows what I call a dumb sucker

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I was just on owasco Sunday it was my first time ever even seeing the lake and I did manage to get into some lakers but nothing with size I do know some guys that did decent their Sunday as well buy no fireworks yes I am partial to Seneca but also I like catching fish so my choice is Seneca Cayuga has been upsetting all year and those tackle busting Atlantic's you talked about yeah they are in Seneca as well not to mention some big bows this yearpost-147332-13790281968433_thumb.jpgpost-147332-13790282524442_thumb.jpg

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It is probably a matter of Lake O being a much much larger body of water so they may not appear as concentrated but keep in mind Lake O is where the lampreys originally came from in the Finger Lakes (via the canal system).

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Sk8man, very interesting!  I had previously thought the lamprey came from the Erie Canal via the Hudson River system and this was indeed the line of thought for some time.  Seeing your post made me go looking for information, and I found that in 2005 a paper was published to support the Lake Ontario theory.  

 

The authors did genetic testing to determine the origins of lamprey in the Great Lakes, Cayuga, and Champlain.  They go so far as to claim the lamprey in Ontario, Cayuga, and Champlain are 'native' and came through via natural migrations up the St. Lawrence into Ontario, then spread through the canals to the Finger Lakes and Champlain.  Also, they are genetically distinct from upper Great Lakes lamprey.  Cool stuff and thanks for the more recent info!

 

edited for typos + a little info

 

edit 1000:  see below for link

Edited by hermit
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Oops, okay.  Got rid of the extra parenthesis in the text but not the link.  Will fix it now.  It doesn't say much more than what I posted as it's just the abstract.

 

OKAY... can't actually fix the original post!  I changed it twice but for some reason it's not actually doing it.  Bug?  Anyway, the correct link:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16202094

 

Also, I can see calling Ontario lamprey native if they came up through the St Lawrence, but not the Finger Lakes or Champlain lamprey- if their only means of access was due to the canal system, then that's caused by us.  Not sure if they get into that in the article or not, I'm trying to get ahold of it and will post more at some point if there is anything interesting.

Edited by hermit
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