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youngknight

running both main motor and kicker off of one battery

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First, it seems that there could be a whole website just dedicated to kickers.  I came across a comment on another board that I visited for the first time today...-13deg Celcius today, every lake in my area still covered in ice and I'm getting itchy so have been searching for stuff to read while still looking out the window at snow - 6 inches the night before...anyhow, the comment from one person was never have a main motor and a kicker motor on the same battery...a poster thought it would damage the battery.

 

So, Yamaha 115 4 stroke is main, a new 2012 9.9 Yamaha 4 stroke is kicker - kicker has electric start...apparently the alternator puts out up to 6A.  I have 2 deep cycle batteries up front for the electric motor, I figure that if I ever did get in trouble with the main battery at the back, I could move one of them down in a pinch to get the main motor started.  I have 2 electric big jon downriggers and of course a sonar and vhf and a stereo off of the main battery.  I figured I could just hook the kicker into the main battery as well...never run both engines at once...the kicker would keep the battery charged for downriggers..etc., and when it is time to go, shut it down and start up the main....without getting into yet another battery on the boat, battery switches...etc.

 

It is a 19 foot Lund boat BTW.  I want to keep things simple as possible, and remove the kicker when not needed...e.g. family boatings, tubing and the like, don't really want another several pounds in the back with another battery if I don't really need it.

 

any advice, will 2 motors on the same battery be a problem?

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I just bought a star craft that they set up with 200 Yamaha and a 9.9 kicker one battery never said I needed two , I had two installed but that was my choice , my 1988 star craft had a 80 hp mercy and a 15 hp kicker off one battery for years , had extra battery under center console for electronics not connected to main motor battery.......   

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i have a 90 hp merc and a 7.5hp merc kicker with only one batt. for 8 years and no problems.

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I've run my 9.9 from same start up battery as my 135 outboard and did so on my previous boat with same kicker.I run only my downriggers and electric trolling motor from the second deep cycle battery.  By the way I was told some time ago by a marine mechanic that the alternator on the kicker won't do any serious charging while trolling slow....it has to be running at a good clip to start charging the battery significantly. I have an older 2 stroke 9.9 so the newer 4 stroke ones may be different.

Edited by Sk8man

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I run sonar, downriggers, stereo, livewells, vhf, ipod, cell phone charger, spotlight, running lights all off 1 battery charged from my 25hp 4 stroke mercury, and I run it at an idle almost exclusively other than a 10 minute run out and a 10 minute run back.  I fished several times a week all season and this will be my third year on the battery.  I have 2 more batteries for my trolling motor that could be moved in emergency though Ive never had to do it.

justin

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I'm not a fan of running both motors off the same battery, my background is in the electric industry. All alternators do not charge the same so I never run both at once. My kicker & electronics are off one, while the main motor is off another so there isn't a conflict, I do have a perko switch between them that I can close if I have battery trouble and alternate between batteries. I know some disagree but the investment is big so I play it safe.

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get a switch, in case you need to isolate sh*t fast, once cables start smoking or melting :)

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I removed my second battery to better balance the boat after I installed my 9.9 Honda. If my battery failed I can easily start my kicker with the pull cord and it has a 6 amp charging alternator that will help start the main engine. Running both engines at the same time has not been a problem for the past five years and the transom height is a little safer especially when I hang my big butt over the stern to net a fish.

Edited by jimski2

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Sorry I have to revisit this, my questions are similar, but I have twin outboards and want to get a kicker. I have 2 batteries, no room for a third. Each main is connected to its own battery. Should I be OK putting the kicker and one main outboard on one battery? I've heard conflicting reports....

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After ten years I have had no problems . I do have a 3 stage battery charger hooked up 24:7 all year also. I can start my Honda kicker with a pull cord as a backup to charge the battery if needed.

Edited by jimski2

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I have the same set up, 2 batteries hooked to the Perko selecter switch, I run my electronics and kicker off one and my main motor off the other, when my finder shows less than 11volts 10.9-10.5Volts, I just fire up the main switch the selector switch to both. When I'm reading 14 volts I shut her down and go back to Battery 1. I was self employed, and had a starter and alternator shop so I have a 130 amp alt also, but any alt. Will do the job just take longer.

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If you are running 2 batteries I would run the kicker on the battery with the accessories attached to it to keep it charged and leave the big motor on its own battery. I don't like the idea of running everything off 1 battery just extra insurance having 2. IF something happened to the starting battery on your big motor you would be able to swap the big motor to the 2nd battery and still fire her up to get back to shore otherwise you would need to use your little motor.

 

Anyone that has been stranded on Lake O. and only having their kicker to get back in will tell you it is a creepy feeling knowing that little motor is your only chance back to shore.

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If you are running 2 batteries I would run the kicker on the battery with the accessories attached to it to keep it charged and leave the big motor on its own battery. I don't like the idea of running everything off 1 battery just extra insurance having 2. IF something happened to the starting battery on your big motor you would be able to swap the big motor to the 2nd battery and still fire her up to get back to shore otherwise you would need to use your little motor.

 

Anyone that has been stranded on Lake O. and only having their kicker to get back in will tell you it is a creepy feeling knowing that little motor is your only chance back to shore.

X2 not to mention the countless hrs. It takes to get back at 3.5-4mph, don't ask how I know this. LOL

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I'm using one of the two trolling motor batteries that are wired in series for my 24 V trolling motor to run 4 riggers, FF, FH, and TrollMaster. So now I can troll all day long with my kicker and not have to worry about the cranking battery starting the boat when it's time to go home. No problems so far.

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I think the main consideration relating to the issue of batteries (for me at least) is safety and especially on Lake O. It is an unforgiving environment and lake and if unfavorable circumstances come together like being out in the middle of the lake and having your battery crap out with a storm brewing and the waves building it becomes real clear what the advantages are having "options". Having been through this situation in a small boat in the past the concept of safety options is uppermost in my mind.  Luckily my kicker came through for me with the pull start but with my current boat I have made sure I have a number of "options". I have even changed my setup since my previous post. I have a starting battery and a heavy duty combination deep cycle/starting battery. I have just my primary depth finder (which is a low draw) wired directly to the starting battery along with the lights and bilge pump which come through the main panel. The downriggers and kicker etc. are connected to the deep cycle combo battery and the kicker is a 4 stroke with a 6 amp alternator with pull start as well hooked to the combo battery. I also carry a portable D cell battery powered bilge pump with a section of garden hose to reach outside the boat. Even though my boat is advertised as "unsinkable" I don't depend on it with my life :lol:

Edited by Sk8man

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Absolutely Les, you hit the nail on the head!! After my experience I now carry a third up in the cuddy, with a pair of jumper cables. I'm also considering one of those jump boxes, but I don't know how much reserve they have. I had a battery puke while fishing, went to hit the key and nothing 😱 So luckily the other battery had enough juice to start the main, if I would of only had 1 battery it would be a long ride home with the kicker.

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I just installed a second battery, Perko switch, two 4 lug 150 amp buss bars, two new fuse panels.  I also wanted a second battery.

 

I trailer the boat with drain plug removed, no need for me to direct wire the auto bilge pump. 

 

The thing missing in this thread is the fuse within 7 inches of the positive terminal.  I put a terminal fuse block on each battery.  I do not ever expect to see or smell main cables smoking.  I use a 125 amp fuse, the correct size for the cable.

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I just installed a second battery, Perko switch, two 4 lug 150 amp buss bars, two new fuse panels.  I also wanted a second battery.

 

I trailer the boat with drain plug removed, no need for me to direct wire the auto bilge pump. 

 

The thing missing in this thread is the fuse within 7 inches of the positive terminal.  I put a terminal fuse block on each battery.  I do not ever expect to see or smell main cables smoking.  I use a 125 amp fuse, the correct size for the cable.

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I work with DC on my job all of the time, in the telephone industry, and what I can tell you about batteries, fuses and cables is all pretty simple.  When cables start to smoke and start fires it is because everyone uses as light of gauge wire as they think they can get away with for cost, and ease of pulling through the boat, etc.  My advice is to always use as big of gauge wire as you can get away with, to lessen your resistance and improve your current flow.  If I could, I would wire everything on my boat with 6 gauge flex wire.  That would pretty much alleviate all chance of cables smoking, etc.!!  Don't forget to fire up your big motor from time to time while still fishing and running your livewells, lights, sonar, etc., to put a charge back on your batteries, as well.  Thanks. :yes:  :yes:

Edited by John Kelley

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The direct to the battery bilge pump is a Coast Guard rule. For safety since a bilge pump is independent of all other accessories.

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