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SHAKE-N-BAKE

Best boat trailer bearing grease?

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Lubrimatic marine and off road grease. Kind of a blue green color. Same stuff for trunion and tilt on my out boards.

cent frum my notso smart fone

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I think I use similar stuff to what Mark described only it is called Triple Guard Grease.   started using it back in 1979 on my previous boat trailer. Had it 22 years and never had new bearings despite much trailering. I've used it on present trailer with same bearings for 12 years and when I had the bearings checked last week they said they were fine. I swear by it (same blue/green color as described and VERY thick consistency). I also used Bearing Buddies on both trailers. You have to be careful not to fill the bearing cavity too full as it could blow out through the rear seals of the wheels.

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Blue high temperature disc brake wheel bearing grease, synthetic I believe. Do not use the old brown stuff.

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Lubrimatic marine and off road grease. Kind of a blue green color. Same stuff for trunion and tilt on my out boards.

cent frum my notso smart fone

That's what I use.

 

Make sure you buy a grease that says for marine use. Don't go with the heaviest grease you can find because it won't dissipate the heat...ask me how I know.

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I'm gonna go with an AMSoil product next time.  My bearings have worn out super-fast in the last few years.  I've had new ones installed almost every fall when i get my boat winterized.  The place i take it to checks them.  I do probably put 4-5,000 miles on my trailer every year.  And it goes in and out of the water probably 30 times.  But it just doesn't seem right. 

Edited by BAZOOKAJOE

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Bazookajoe,

 

I agree, that doesn't sound right..  Do you have bearing buddies on your hubs? 

 

Tim

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for   bearing grease  the best to use  is   LPS   makes a grease  Aqua  for water applications.  The  brand  of bearings   is  important   there are many  no  name   chineese on the market    use Timken bearings made in the USA and Timken seals also  you will  get  many years of life going this way.

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Thanks again guys. I have to get my over greasing habit under control. It has caused me lots of unnecessary work!

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You can ruin a bearing by "overgreasing" it. Bearing buddies can add to your problems.

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If you watch the center "disk" on the bearing buddy and when it starts to move outward you need to stop putting grease in it. As I mentioned above. it is important not to "over grease" or you'll be letting the water in there. Getting the kind of life out of the bearings I've been getting may mean I've been doing something right at least.... :lol:

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I really worry about losing a bearing on the highway so I bought a spare hub with bearings installed, mounted it on the spare tire and now if I lose a bearing, it's as simple as changing a tire. And I didn't realize you could overfill a bearing...thanks for that info, I'll keep an eye on that center disk from now on.

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Agreed, I have been blowing thru the cheap Chinese bearing packs within a couple of years of light trailering.  Don't go cheap on the bearing packs!!!

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I use amsoil synthetic blue grease. I suggest filling your hubs by hand and not pumping grease in till the bearing buddy cap moves, even then I had a problem with new seals last year. Carry a cheap heat gun and check the hubs for excessive heat at the stops along the way. Mine range from 70 to 110 depending on road and ambient temps, when they all read within a couple degrees, I'm happy. One other tip, I have a dual axle trailer, after you remove hubs to change out bearings , grease and remount, drive that rig for 50 or so miles and when you get home jack that rig up and check for play on the bearings by grabbing the tire with both hands and see if you get any play forward and back. I just did mine and found one alittle too loose so I tighten down on the nut one notch on nut cover. If you change out bearings it's better to be on the safe side.

Edited by Roughrider IV

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A couple things come to mind regarding my own situation that may be worth mentioning....I usually trailer relatively short distances (other than when I go to Lake Ontario) and I have a single axle trailer and boat weighing about 3,200 pounds. I refill any grease that is needed each time I return from using the boat and I don't haul at high speeds (e.g. Thruway etc.) nor do I encounter any real mountainous terrain which can give rise to significant heat issues. So I guess what I'm saying here is related to "light trailer"use compared with larger heavier boats trailered over great distances and hilly terrain or high speeds on the expressways which are very different conditions. Just something to keep in mind....

 

Something also worthy of consideration if you do trailer in those heavier trailering conditions is don't back your trailer immediately into the water as soon as you come off the road (as I've seen people do) wait a few minutes for the hubs to cool down a bit first.

Edited by Sk8man

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Warm wheel bearings will suck water into the bearing area every time to you launch your boat and the hubs go into cold water, seals or not. The good synthetic grease will protect your bearings, the old soap based greases will dissolve in the water. You really can not get by with water there every time you launch. The best move to make now is to jack up each wheel at the axle and spin the tire. Any noise or growling present means to change and lube your bearing now, not on the road. If you see your wheels wobbling going down the road in your rear view mirror, you are in a bad situation.

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I'm gonna go with an AMSoil product next time.  My bearings have worn out super-fast in the last few years.  I've had new ones installed almost every fall when i get my boat winterized.  The place i take it to checks them.  I do probably put 4-5,000 miles on my trailer every year.  And it goes in and out of the water probably 30 times.  But it just doesn't seem right. 

It sounds like they are over tightening them if they wear out that fast.  Generally I pull mine once a year check for wear and repack. When you are running on a trip pull over and touch the bearing, if they are hot then they are either going bad or over tightened.  When I tighten mine I do it hand tight then 1 notch on the castle nut.  I run it then jack back up and check for play.  You should have very little to no play.

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I do have bearing-buddy's.  But i do most of my trailering on the thruway or highways at 70+ MPH on hot summer days.  Maybe that's what my problem is!?

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bearing endplay should be hand tight and no more. a water resistant grease is best to be used, and cool down your hubs before backing in the water. If you pop you caps and see the grease getting milky it is breaking down with the water. always carry a spare set of bearings with you. I get 5-7 years on a set of bearings and then I change them only cause I feel its time.

use American made bearings there are so many out there from China and they are junk first of all they have a problem with 52100 bearing steel and quality is poor that's why that almost what you see out there even from the trailer mfg. I have sold bearings for 35 plus years and have seen all kinds.

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The ambient temp shouldn't make any difference.  Periodically pull the bearing buddys and look for discolored grease.  That is a definite sign you have water intrusion into the bearing and the rear seal needs to be replaced. While it is getting replaced re-pack the bearing.

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Just returned from a 50 mile test run with new bearing, brakes and surge unit. Left side ice cold, right side just a hint of warmth. Checked wheel tightness when I returned home, just a hint of play. I'm thinking I should leave it alone. Any thoughts?

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Just returned from a 50 mile test run with new bearing, brakes and surge unit. Left side ice cold, right side just a hint of warmth. Checked wheel tightness when I returned home, just a hint of play. I'm thinking I should leave it alone. Any thoughts?

I'd say your ready to roll.

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just a word of advice ... always let your trailer cool down after hauling a little bit before backing it into the lake helps considerable in saving bearing ...just a pain when you wanna be on the water for sure

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