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ddubs3

New boat - Lund, Smoker Craft, or Hewescraft opinions

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So I just totaled the Tracker Targa 18WT that we had for the past four years and it is time for a new boat. I don't want another Tracker because I feel the platform in back really cuts down on fishing room and makes it hard for older guys to work the rods and fight fish. We also had a terrible experience with the marina we bought the boat from and had nothing but problems with the trailer....which led to the ultimate demise of the boat when the axle broke.

Right now we are considering three different manufacturers and are looking for input and experiences. Will probably bought something in the 20-22' range. We will need cover from the elements and I don't want an inboard. My wife and I almost exclusively troll for walleye, salmon, and trout on Erie and Ontario.

Lund

I've always considered these the "Cadillacs" of aluminum fishing boats. They seem to have a lot of available features, but are pricey. I've seen quite a few while trolling. The Sport Angler looks appropriate for what we want to do.

Smoker Craft

I've seen a few of these trolling and really like the design, but they seem to be bare bones without many features. The Phantoms look nice.

Hewescraft

I've never seen one of these while trolling, but a guy I know keeps one on Ontario. He loves it and the design and features look really nice. This is probably our front runner right now, although there are no dealers remotely close. They are very popular on the West Coast and Alaska.

I've also looked at Crestliners, Alumacraft, Starcraft, and a few other brands but haven't been overly impressed.

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The Lund is a fine boat but dont compare it to a hewescraft. I just spent 2 daysin portland looking at all the plate boats. Hold onto your wallet.....you will be in the 50s for a 21 footer. The 22 footers I was looking at where 70 ish. They are awesome boats.  I found something else but I still think a plate boat is a wa

nna have in the future

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I have owned two Lunds, an 18' and a 20' and now a 24' Hewescraft Alaskan. I had great luck with the Lunds but wanted something larger for fishing Lake Ontario. There is no comparison between the boats. The Hewescraft is built like a tank and industrial work machine. I love the hardtop to get out of the elements and for security as I can lock everything up. I purchased mine in Portland at Clemens marine, Rod Price at 503-283-1712. I didn't seem to click with the dealer near Chicago. They are not cheap but you will never have to buy another boat. This time of the year brings some pretty good pricing on leftover models. If the Hewescraft is too much I would favor the Lund.

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I've had an Alumacraft Trophy 195 for 9years now. A very well built boat, without the Lund price tag.

Edited by daker1979

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I'm a Lund guy, had Alumacraft, & Crestliner. looked seriously at the sport angler but settled on the Tyee Magnum. The sport craft has more room for finshing because all the compartments are open without doors but I settled on the Tyee because of how I wanted to mount the downriggers.

 

However, if my ship came in I would I would get the Tyee 2075 what a sweet ride, the Baron is a bit bigger but I don't like the fish/sport model for fishing.

 

As for price! Trying sitting down first.

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If you're in the Canandaigua area, Seager Marine has several LUND's to look at.  Some of them are shown on their website (Seagermarine.com).  There are some 2014's with some good prices.

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Smokercraft has for a number of years had the welded west coast line of boats, the American Angler boats:

 

www.americananglerboats.com/

 

Any brand new boat is going to be expensive, that is a given.  I agree that winter is the best time to buy that new boat, leftovers, dealers going out of business etc.  

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In the same class of Hewscraft there is the Kingfisher (Harbercraft) and it's build in Canada in the province of British Columbia (west coast). The fact that it is a Canadian made boat and the value of the Canadian $$ vs the US $ the price could be lower then you think.

 

http://www.kingfisherboats.com/

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ddubs3:

 

Owned two Lund's  16' side console & a 20' Newport CC, they were great boat's, but are riveted construction, which inherently can lead to problems.  I replaced about 20 rivets on the Newport. I purchased a new Hewescraft in 2011, & have been extremely pleased with it. The boat is basically indestructible with normal use. Get your check book ready if you go for a Hewes!

 

Best of luck with your decision.

 

John

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I also have been looking  for a new boat  or new to me. looking  at a hewscraft  and   a down east  boat like  a eastern  or a seaway  Something with a hardtop I   have  owned  Lunds  terribly  overpriced,  and Hydrasports, and Starcrafts.     I  am looking for something that or can easily be set  up for the O.

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No shortage of opinions as to best boat.  I had many of the same questions before I bought my new boat last year.  I decided on a Crestliner 2150 SST Sportfish for a few of reasons.  I have owned a Lund in the past, good boat but lack of a deep motor well had left me with water rolling up over the transom on more than on occasion on Lake O.  Only the Baron has one and its design really cuts down on cockpit space.   I wanted a large motor well so I would have a full height transom; a large, deep cockpit; good speed; plenty of storage; good fuel economy and be easy to trailer.  I have been more than pleased with the Crestliner.

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I am pricing a few of those westcoast  boats  to see  just how proud of them they are.

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I don't mean to go off on a tangent, but what is the difference between Lund and Crestliner other than one is riveted and one is welded.  They both come out of the same plant so I would imagine they share a lot of the same components.  They are both owned by the mega conglomeration Brunswick Marine.  So what is the real difference with these two brands other than one is welded and the other is riveted?  

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Rivets will leak over time.

Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Crestliners hulls have been known to crack,you can't pound then.

Couldn't disagree more.  Urban legends abound about many boats but the fact usually turn out different.  The modern welding techniques used by Crestliner and other quality manufacturers preclude the old problem of overheating the hull plating adjacent to the welds.  That was a major cause of cracking due to the hull becoming brittle back in the day but not now.   Most of the high end west coast boats are also welded, not riveted. 

 

I have run my Crestliner pretty hard with no ill effects as have a couple of my friends whose Crestliners are more than a few years old. 

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Couldn't disagree more.  Urban legends abound about many boats but the fact usually turn out different.  The modern welding techniques used by Crestliner and other quality manufacturers preclude the old problem of overheating the hull plating adjacent to the welds.  That was a major cause of cracking due to the hull becoming brittle back in the day but not now.   Most of the high end west coast boats are also welded, not riveted. 

 

I have run my Crestliner pretty hard with no ill effects as have a couple of my friends whose Crestliners are more than a few years old. 

Thanks for the info. on that problem, glade to hear you and your friends are having good luck with your boats. :)

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I know welding techniques have improved but y o u can still find an awful lot of boats from the 50's and 60's out there and they are all riveted. The only issue with these older boats tend to be rotten transforms or floors. My point is a premium boat will usually last if you take care of it. There are an awful lot of designs out there so find one with the specific features you want.

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I know welding techniques have improved but y o u can still find an awful lot of boats from the 50's and 60's out there and they are all riveted. The only issue with these older boats tend to be rotten transforms or floors. My point is a premium boat will usually last if you take care of it. There are an awful lot of designs out there so find one with the specific features you want.

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I have a 1956 Crestliner and a 1986 Sea Nymph-both riveted -no leaks.

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i just priced out  a kingfisher  2425    w 225 hp  and a 10 hp kicker   less  electronics   67k  and then  have to  ship it to the east coast   

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Look into Stanley boats too, great boats!!!

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