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momay4000

Is a sea trial necessary for a boat sale?

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Hi LOU friends,

 

In follow up to my previous post and my thoughts on selling my boat this spring, my question is: is it completely necessary to provide a sea trial to every prospective buyer interseted in purchasing my used boat?

 

My boat is an 08' Trophy and is in great shape but I can certainly understand wanting a sea trial. That being said, I was already stood up at the last minute by a recent person who expessed interest in buying my boat and who requested a sea trial first. Granted, my boat isn't really for sale yet, but I had taken time off from work to meet him, only for him to cancel that morning. I'm curious what other folks have done when buying/selling a boat.

 

For me, it's just a matter of time - 2-3 hours of trailering/launching/driving the boat around/and retrieving it. There's nothing for me to hide, and I can understand the seriousness of a purchase on a vessel in the 17-20K price range.

 

I know I have bought two other used boats without any type of seatrial and everything turned out fine.

 

What have others done, and what thoughts do folks have on this?

 

Thanks folks,

 

Chris

 

 

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I;ve bought boats with and without a sea trial, depends on buyer and price. Its certainly a reasonable request for a  buyer. You may want to look at having someone broker it for you, but your looking at paying them a percentage of the sale for their services. PM me with questions

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Anyone buying without a sea trial and a survey better know a lot about the boat or you really have to trust the seller and even then I'd want both!

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Thanks gentlemen,

 

I didn't even think of the broker idea - perfect. It's worth the commission. I personally want a future buyer to test drive it as it makes me feel better, but it's hard with my schedule so this will answer that need.

 

Thanks again boys,

 

Chris

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When I've sold boats in the past, I would make the sea trial the final part of the selling process, and request a $100 deposit from the buyer.  If nothing else, it helps weed out people looking for a free ride.

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When I've sold boats in the past, I would make the sea trial the final part of the selling process, and request a $100 deposit from the buyer.  If nothing else, it helps weed out people looking for a free ride.

 

This makes complete sense.  Make a deal subject only to satisfactory sea trial.

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Chris,

 

With the 2 boats I purchased I requested and was granted a sea trial and survey.  In both cases the broker asked for a $1000.00 deposit.  The deal was then contingent on the sea trial and survey.  If something went awry I was given back my money.  In both cases I ended up buying the boat because everything was good.  I can definitely see where it would be a PITA to go through all of the hassle and then either get blown off or take people out for a joy ride.  You have to be the one to guage the buyers "Actual Interest", in the boat or if they are just kicking tires.  There are a lot of tire kickers or dreamers out there.  Best of luck with the sale.  I'll miss your videos the most...

 

John

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Outstanding ideas gentlemen - I thank you kindly.

 

I'm still not 100% sure if I'm selling but if I do, it's pointing in that direction for the spring. I thank you all for the kind words - I promise to put up a "year end" video (lens scratches and all) to sum up the fishing year.

 

Thanks again friends,

 

Chris

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Yeah, you want to weed out the guys who can't decide on anything.

You want to reserve sea trials for those serious only.

 

I would say request a deposit ($100 or so) and if they don't show or don't end

up buying the boat (assuming it's in good working condition) then they forfeit the deposit.

That said, you would want an offer subject to sea trial, and if a new problem comes up

that warrants breaking the deal, well the guy gets back his deposit.

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Thanks again LOU friends,

 

Sadly my last LOU trip on my boat will be tomorrow as I will be pulling her out of the water next weekend for the last time. I plan on brokering her for sale in the next few weeks through Krenzer's and I will post a link to the listing when it's available.

 

More to come - thanks again for the posts above regarding using a broker

 

Tight lines,

 

Chris

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