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FishingTheFL

Bass Boat Hull Repair- Fiber Glass

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Support the chines along the back of the boat, and the lifting rakes in the front with some blocking. When you cut the floor and stringers out, the center of the hull tries to spring up, pushing the chines and rakes down. If the trailer is well bunked with wide boards, it may not be an issue. On faster boats this makes them ill handling at higher speed if gets out of whack. Before you take the top off, you need 3 2x4's hold the sides from bowing out. You have to work around them. You take them out when the top is back on. If you don't, you will have a hull with new wood, and a top that will never fit back on the boat. It is nothing you can't prevent. Take your time, lots of measurements, lots of pictures with the tape measure in the pic.

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I'm going to try get away with cutting the transom out from the back without popping the top. Might have to install in 3 sections but it won't lose the shape.

Today while it's warm I'm going to clean up around the edges, finish getting the motor off, and get some pictures. Couple more weeks and it should be warm through out the nights so I can start getting fiber glass laid. I'm waiting on a buddy to clear a section of his garage so we can get out of the weather. I found about 4 lights with clamps and lizard bulbs in storage. Should help get the holes patched. Seems all the pieces are coming together slowly. Envious of all the boats that were out yesterday! I'll make it out sooner or later lol

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You can grind the whole back of the transom off also. Just leave 3 inches fillet around the outside of the hull that you can blend the new glass into. When its cut out, grind from the corners and bottom to an edge that will cut you, leaving at least 3 inches of original material. That equals 1 piece transom wood and no air pockets in the work. Cover the back with four pieces of fabric staggering the orientation so it crosses around 45 degrees to one another.

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Man I wish I had someone like you 2lbperch, fishingTheFL you are a lucky sole to have such a high level of Intel and advice to help you through this prodject, I did mine I went 1 section at a time. I kind of had idea that things would shift and I didn't think of adding supports to help keep things in place. The only thing I did all in one shot is cut the floor out. After pulling the outdrive then the power plant I did the transome, then the 4x4 motor mounts then the bulkhead the then stringers one at a time until I hit the steering console and from there it was all good with very little wood up under the console. Time is critical and the same as measurements. The way I did it was a pain in the ass to say the least, but I don't think working around braces would be any easier, but you would have a much cleaner atmosphere for sure. I just shop vac. often either way time and mainly patients is of the essence!!! Sound like you got it going one so far. Best of luck!!! pap?

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I have screwed some stuff up. It gets easier each time. Grind outside with a furnace fan behind you. Take the hottest shower you can stand, opens your skin pores to release the glass particles. Get gallons of acetone to keep things clean. The most important is to not get distracted, like getting interrupted while pumping the resin and hardener in the cup. Start over. Not fun grinding soft epoxy that won't set cause your drunk buddy had something so important to tell you. I've got lots of the powdered glass that sets up hard to use as structure filler, between the plywood cuts, and the easy sanding micro balloons for the finish work. Make some 3 foot clamps with 2×4's and threaded rod to hold the pieces tight while curing. A glorified wood clamp. I forgot who borrowed mine, or I'd loan em to you. Temperature is key, and always sand the blush off. The more humidity, the worse it is.

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In pic #2, someone has been there in the past with a "repair"? Don't go crazy & cut everything. Start with a protractor set @ 3", follow the hull lines & cut there on the back. Get the plywood in. The inside near the stringers should be fixed 2nd. Fiberglass will not lose integrity until it is swollen and becomes waterlogged. Appears it is along the bottom on the inside. Get the transom in, grind the inside out after. Progress is good, any more questions, ask. Have fun.

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Sounds good. Thanks again. I have a small job for this morning then I'll start the cutting. Looks like crap weather for another week but I can get the transom out, cut, sealed, and ready to put in for the next warm spell. Looks like late May or early June she'll be in the water!

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At least your being realistic with yourself. Does the inside look shyty as if that's the side your going with or does it look easier taking the outside off? If so by all means use a protractor to measure in the same distance all the way around. I used 4" cut off wheel, they sell real thin ones, buy a few of those and you'll need those white nose and mouth protection. You will look like a snowman, actually the last job I did I went and purchased those white painter suits. They are cheap and they keep all that dust off of you, that's a lot of cutting, I would take the trim off the back to see if there is a seam from where the top meets the bottom. Some do some don't. Either way that's where you need to split the top from the bottom. Once you get that far then take a pic, then we can see the next step, which will be removing the wood, and we want to keep it as whole as possible to make the pattern for the new wood, but don't panic if you can't, then it's a lot of measurement and trials and errors till it fits. Good luck, keep at it and before you know it you'll be saying " that wasn't to bad" LOL? PAP

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The inside is real bad. Paper like. I think the easiest way is to cut it from the outside. 3" all the way around seems a bit big. 2" probably would work better but I'll start with 3". I can pull the trim off but I'm going to try refrain from popping the top.

This my plan-

Cut the outside back out, pull all rotted wood and material out, build a cardboard template, cut the new transom, treat with West system, insert new transom, fiberglass the outside, paint, then get in the interior and cut the interior fiber glass out, fix the floor beams in that area, fiber glass the interior back, fix the rest of the main beams, paint for protection, insert floor board, fiber glass that in, after that... it's seats and exterior paint! Lots of work a head of me.

I'm defiantly upgrading to a face shield and breather. White masks don't last long and still let stuff threw. Painter suite is a good idea also. I use them when cutting down trees with poison ivy on them. They tear easy but they save a lot of skin!

Edited by FishingTheFL

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The inside is real bad. Paper like. I think the easiest way is to cut it from the outside. 3" all the way around seems a bit big. 2" probably would work better but I'll start with 3". I can pull the trim off but I'm going to try refrain from popping the top.

This my plan-

Cut the outside back out, pull all rotted wood and material out, build a cardboard template, cut the new transom, treat with West system, insert new transom, fiberglass the outside, paint, then get in the interior and cut the interior fiber glass out, fix the floor beams in that area, fiber glass the interior back, fix the rest of the main beams, paint for protection, insert floor board, fiber glass that in, after that... it's seats and exterior paint! Lots of work a head of me.

I'm defiantly upgrading to a face shield and breather. White masks don't last long and still let stuff threw. Painter suite is a good idea also. I use them when cutting down trees with poison ivy on them. They tear easy but they save a lot of skin!

Yea they tear easy but they do work, when I did my uncles boat he had the mask and I could go along time with it. I sprayed the floor with truck bed liner, the stuff I used came with the gun and you could tint it whatever color you want.

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Transom is out! Having hard time getting the last bit of wood off. Looks like they just added one piece over the old one... Fiber glassed it back in... Any suggestions for getting the last ply that is glued to the hull off? Warmer weather coming. Hope to get this project done in next 3 weeks.

Sent from my XT1528 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Scrapped all the wood that I could get off. Is it possible to paint a layer of resin over top of the little bit of wood that is left and sand it a enough to get the new transom in? Only other way I can think of is a power metal brush or sander

Sent from my XT1528 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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I know people have used those sanding flap wheels on a grinder to get that stuff off but lots of dust.

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Yup, flapper wheel. Get the new wood done, all epoxied and fitting well, meaning square . Have it ready on the sawhorse. Mix a batch with some filler, can use ag lime if you didn't save dust, spread that on in a coat to fill in voids, clamp the new in letting the filler squish out. Fill the gap between the hull and wood with thickened epoxy also. Fabric over that at least 2 times, wrapping it forward 8" & 12". Looks like you've gotten after it. I didn't see any beer cans in the pics? Takes a few to get me in the grinding mood.

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Have you decided what kind of resin system you will be using? Epoxy or Polyester? If you are using epoxy resin you wont be able to use fiberglass mat (the stuff that looks like all random fiberglass fibers)

The reason is that there is a binder in that material that holds the strands together ,and epoxy resin does not have any solvents in it that will dissolve that binder.and as so you will not be able to wet out the fabric.

Polyester and Vinylester resins contain styrene and that's what dissoIves the binder and lets you wet out thefabric nicely.

 

If you are using Epoxy resin and want or need to use a fabric with mat then you'll need to use what is called stitch-mat. It's a woven double bias fabric fabric with mat on the other side.No solvent is necessary with this product as the mat is held to the fabric with stitching.When you hear someone saying 1708 or 1808 those are stitchmat fabrics.

They are the standard in the industry(along with mat )and are a extremely good structurally strong fabric. this is what you want to use to tab in stringers to the hull.

 

If I was in your shoes ,I'd use a polyester or vinylester resin, then you can use any fabric. Yes epoxy has a stronger mechanical bond and is more flexible but it's far more expensive and really not needed.In fact Vinylester is stronger than epoxy.I guarantee your boat was laid up with polyester.

Which ever resin type you use if you do the job right and allow channels for any water to drain away from stringers bulkheads etc and into the bilge the repair will last longer than you.When you come across rot,or fractures in a boats hull,it's never the resin system that failed,it's usually a case of sloppy glasswork. boat factories(no matter the brand) are not immune to questionable workmanship.

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Yes, easy is correct. I forgot about the binder in mat. I've got a roll of 1708. It's +,-, 45 degree with mat stitched onto the back. Fair Haven area. I'll sell you some if you're wanting to work this weekend.

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Works been slow. Trying to come up with the funding right now for the rest of the material. Good info to know tho. I'll start looking into prices tonight. I'm north of Ithaca but don't mind traveling. With the weather warming up hopefully people start spending some money with us tree guys instead of the heating companies :)

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Yes, post some pics and a general synopsis of the product. I have heard good and bad about it. I always put in new stringers while replacing a transom, I cut 8" off the waterlogged string to pound in a 2x4 to help clamp the bottom of the new transom. I never have left the old glass. Fish FL, not worried about $ today. I'm not on a project right now. If you want some stuff let me know. I've got a dead cherry tree you can drop if you bring a saw and wedges with you. Works for me.

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Big thumb hit the button too quick. 8" grinder with a 24 grit disc, eats wood and glass easily. Chopped glass in the black bag, for structure filler. Red stuff is micro balloons, easy sanding filler for finish. I've got epoxy also.

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How many coats of resin on the plywood? Or is it epoxy? I know I read it some where on one of the boating forums. It seems like a lot a work a head.. But I'll be so glad to not have to worry about sinking any time soon. Next boat I buy I'll know what to look for... Live and learn.

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At least 2 coats on it. More on the cut edge as it wicks it in. Just watch it, have a beer or 2, and re coat the sawn edge. If you get air bubbles in any of the epoxy, run a torch over the surface quickly, they will float out and disappear. You have 12 to 16 hours to work with epoxy for a chemical bond. After that amount time, you need to sand for a mechanical bond. 2 coats on the faces, 4 or 5 on the cut edges.

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