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Chinook Chaser

Okuma solterra

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IMO, 150 yds of backing is only a good idea if you run the rod down the chute. If you run it off a board, you are asking to get spooled. I have had a couple kings hooked funny and almost get spooled with 300 yds of backing off the boards.

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All mine are backed with 150 yds. But I agree...if you hook one funny or in the motor. I did have it happen once. As I saw bare spool I tightened down on him and the fish broke the leader. I didn't care. He was not stopping for anything. And we were in the middle of a armada of boats in Oswego.

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We've been running a 500 copper on a Tekota 800 for years with 150 yards of backing. Never had a problem, and we fish the North shore where the Salmon never forgot how they're supposed to fight. Tighten down your drags a little and if it is a board rod circle your fish. Turn towards the board that the fish hit off, and you'll see fish come to the back of the boat on 600' & 700' coppers that are still green. You just have to reel your butt off.

 

Although in BAZOOKAJOE's instance that might not be something you can pull. Watch now....I'm gonna get spooled this Summer.......

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I had a 27lb king almost spool me a couple seasons ago.  It was hooked in the dorsal fin.  Before I could get the boat turned, I was down to 100' of backing!  I have had a couple hooked in the top of the head that were hard to slow down too.  I would rather have a little bit of insurance than get spooled. 

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A couple things strike me as worth mentioning here just as food for thought regarding the issue of how much backing you have.  The running the chute vs,. board setup issue is a good point and some others to think about are; The gear ratio of your reel becomes very important in this situation as does the drag itself and how you use it. Many if not most of the aggressive salmon will stop briefly within a hundred yards or so if they feel increasing tension on the line (I know there are exceptions and I've had them). If you are using a reel with say a 20 lb drag and a gear ratio of 6 to 1 it can be a very different situation than having a drag of 15 lbs and a gear ratio of 3 or 4 to 1 in terms of the amount of control you MAY have over taking line back when provided even the most brief opportunity. I know some folks feel that the drag should be set and then left alone under all circumstances (and it may make a lot of sense for charters for example) but if you have a smooth drag that is familiar to you it can used as an effective weapon against the fish by making him use as much energy as possible to tire him out quickly (especially if they will be released) as there is a point below the breaking strength of line that the fish will be working and pulling against the boat itself rather than just the drag and this is where things can be exploited (not for the average charter customer though :lol: ). Rick mentions another very important thing that is often ignored and that is using the boat in any way possible against the fighting fish and I know it is an unpopular view on here to pull lines and chase down a big fish but sometimes it is necessary (e.g. a tournament where you don't want to take chances) and can also be helpful in the short backing situation as well.

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I never mentioned pulling lines. Just turn the boat. When you're fishing a tourney and have 8 hours to fish battling Salmon on Long coppers takes a lot of time. Circling them cuts down on that time considerably, and I think the lack of pressure on them (not getting pulled against) calms them down some. We'll go so far as to pull a board copper if the chute goes so we can turn on him.

 

And Brian....tighten your drags!  :lol:

Edited by Yankee Troller

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I didn't mean to infer that you pull lines Rick I think we know better than that :lol:

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We've been running a 500 copper on a Tekota 800 for years with 150 yards of backing. Never had a problem, and we fish the North shore where the Salmon never forgot how they're supposed to fight. Tighten down your drags a little and if it is a board rod circle your fish. Turn towards the board that the fish hit off, and you'll see fish come to the back of the boat on 600' & 700' coppers that are still green. You just have to reel your butt off.

Although in BAZOOKAJOE's instance that might not be something you can pull. Watch now....I'm gonna get spooled this Summer.......

I hope I don't hurt myself laughing when you get spooled this summer. You just guaranteed it to happen. Lmao.

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I hope I don't hurt myself laughing when you get spooled this summer. You just guaranteed it to happen. Lmao.[/quote

But... Will he ever tell us ?? 😀

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This is awesome I love stirring things up! Many great comments and suggestions. Ultimately I am gonna stick with what my coach, "gambler", has been teaching me. With his many years of experience and the fish he puts in the boat it's the way to go for me!

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You might want to use your own judgment on setting the drag though :lol:

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I hope I don't hurt myself laughing when you get spooled this summer. You just guaranteed it to happen. Lmao.[/quote

But... Will he ever tell us ??

We will know!

"Fish! Board! Board! Board!!!! Holy crap he's taking a lot of line! Craig....better start turning! CRAIG!!! Turn the damn boat NOW!!! WTF. *€%#£....... Running out of line.....!!!!!! Reel! Reel!! What do you mean he's still going!?!?! F*^¥€!!!!! Son of a............."

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It'd be cool if I could talk a teammate into jumping overboard with the rod in hand to not get spooled!

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Yeah, get one of those blow up pool floaties and your camera ready.

They could just use that blow up doll that was seen on their boat a couple years back. 

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I had a 27lb king almost spool me a couple seasons ago. It was hooked in the dorsal fin. Before I could get the boat turned, I was down to 100' of backing! I have had a couple hooked in the top of the head that were hard to slow down too. I would rather have a little bit of insurance than get spooled.

Were you using black sponge?!

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Were you using black sponge?!

They only "eat" black sponge in the tribs!

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wow!!!! All this from an Okuma Solterra?
I gotta git me one of those!!! I never git that kind of excitement!!! :clap:

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wow!!!! All this from an Okuma Solterra?

I gotta git me one of those!!! I never git that kind of excitement!!! :clap:

I've got one. It never left the cabin last year because my 200's and 500' were getting the job done. But, then again, the Solterra is so good it doesn't need to come out. Just the THREAT of it coming out works on the fish AND the fishermen.

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