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Total Chaos

Coyote or Wolf? Another pic added

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I say catch it so we can all know what it is. Lol

Here is a pic of a nice blonde yote I got this year. post-152786-14541614339626_thumb.jpg

post-152786-1454161464619_thumb.jpg

Trail cam pic and harvested pic.

Mb 550 on a simple dirt hole set.

One of many this year!!! This one being the coolest in color.. It was Early in the season so coat is not real heavy on her.

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There are a lot of large coyotes in the Albany area. I grew up about 20 minutes east of Saratoga and live 15 minutes north of lake George now. I've also seen wolves up close alive and dead in Montana and there is definitely an easy distinction between the two. The nose on wolves doesn't have that tapered appearance and has more of a lab like big round nose pad where most coyotes I've seen have a more Doberman looking skinny pointy nose. I've also read quite a few different articles and journals about the Adirondack coyotes and they have a lot more timberwolf in them than almost any other coyote population in the country. I'm not an expert just guessing that's a large male coyote without the manginess were used to.

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I live in Irondequoit and see big old coyotes all the time, I say it's a coyote. I took this picture just the other day in my back yard. 

post-155305-0-80032700-1454169296_thumb.jpg

Edited by smfishparadise

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There is a story of Facebook about a "Coywolf" they have been spotted in W. Virginia & lands north of the great lakes. They said it is a hybrid cross; 1/4 wolf, 2/3 coyote, & the rest of the DNA shows domesticated dog. The story can be seen at dailymail.co.uk check it out.

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Possible coywolf, a crossbreed from Canada, very common in the Eastern US now.  There is a very good PBS special available online about their life in and around Eastern US cities...very adaptable animals.

 

Here's a pic from my street in North Greece this fall.... no fear of humans as he wandered the neighborhood.

 

 

post-139500-0-55524900-1454277749_thumb.jpg

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Possible coywolf, a crossbreed from Canada, very common in the Eastern US now. There is a very good PBS special available online about their life in and around Eastern US cities...very adaptable animals.

Here's a pic from my street in North Greece this fall.... no fear of humans as he wandered the neighborhood.

That's a coywolf alright!..wolf size body and small head. Looks like he has no neck!

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Possible coywolf, a crossbreed from Canada, very common in the Eastern US now.  There is a very good PBS special available online about their life in and around Eastern US cities...very adaptable animals.

 

Here's a pic from my street in North Greece this fall.... no fear of humans as he wandered the neighborhood.[/quote

Yea I saw that, they were running in packs through the parks and at night the went through the neighborhood, very adaptable critters. The one I shot must of been a city Dog we called him to the edge of the woods on a golf course then he came to within 50 yards and sat down, I mean really, 3 1/2" dead coyote did him in!!

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I'm thinking Coywolf as well, hybrid with  red wolf which need not be red in coloration.

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I'm thinking Coy wolf as well, hybrid with  red wolf which need not be red in coloration.

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I say catch it so we can all know what it is. Lol

Here is a pic of a nice blonde yote I got this year. attachicon.gifImageUploadedByLake Ontario United1454161431.029431.jpg

attachicon.gifImageUploadedByLake Ontario United1454161462.939598.jpg

Trail cam pic and harvested pic.

Mb 550 on a simple dirt hole set.

One of many this year!!! This one being the coolest in color.. It was Early in the season so coat is not real heavy on her.

Blondes are coolpost-150305-14543004622712_thumb.jpg

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no way that is a pure coyote.  Im not saying its a wolf but it sure as hell isnt 100% coyote!

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This is not the original intent of the thread but what I first noticed was just a wild canine with interesting features.  I already had my oh my God moment previously when someone showed me a huge Yote taken in my home town.  I looked at the pic and said that can't be a Yote.  It was verified or so I was told.  My point is this...  Russians have bred jackals with huskys so we know that this is perfectly acceptable as a possibility of recombining domestic/wild traits whatever they may be and in a much shorter period of time than Darwin himself would have suggested.  Every comment I read sounds plausible (except for my first reply - I highly doubt an endangered species from Mexico would end up in Andy's back yard) but if you look at the landscape and the incredible adaptability of the canine itself, why wouldn't there be diversity just like there is with Homo Sapiens?  Yotes are on my list of most adaptable and likely to survive anything.  We can vote all day on it and never settle anything.  So If they are a little bigger or smaller or varied colors or head shapes, I don't think anything strange about it.  The reason, I put this out there is that someone may be looking for a thesis or dissertation.  Darwin states clearly that traits that are better suited will be passed on while weaker traits become extinct, however, it also assumes that there is a stresser upon those populations which makes those traits more or less advantageous and this happens gradually and not immediately.  What happens to a population with no known or definitive stressors?  Also highly adaptable?  No borders?  Ethology, Genetics, Ecology are all areas where this could be a relevant research topic.  A lot of field work - for a much younger man than I...  Babble done - back to guessing...

 

Like I have stated in the past - shoot as many as you can. 

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too late now, but if you could have looked real hard, maybe, just maybe your could find some hair. DNA the answer

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From the Smithsonian:

 

Coywolves are Taking Over Eastern North America Coywolves are not 'shy wolves'—they are coyote-wolf hybrids (with some dog mixed in) and now number in the millions

 

People living in Eastern Canada and U.S. are probably familiar with the smart, adaptable wild canine that lives in their forests, neighborhood parks and even cities. What they may not know is that eastern coyotes aren’t true coyotes at all. They might better be known as hybrids, or coywolves.
 

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/coywolves-are-taking-over-eastern-north-america-180957141/?no-ist

 

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Great topic and some good pics !

Rule #1 If you don't know what it is don't SHOOT it !

 

Have stories of pets being shot ; trespassers walking dogs off lead etc.

Edited by tuffishooker

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Great topic and some good pics !

Rule #1 If you don't know what it is don't SHOOT it !

 

Have stories of pets being shot ; trespassers walking dogs off lead etc.

Excellent advice indeed

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My Grandfather and Great grandfather said our property in the early 50s had a pair of timberwolves. No trail cameras back then to get photos but I am guessing back then if they were around and got into things they were killed. I have seen foot prints in our creek bottom that resemble mountian lions (way too big to be a bobcat).

 

Looks like wolf to me.

Edited by Chas0218

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