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treedude363

help electric downriggers

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I  purchased my  self some magnum mag10stx cannons im  goingot put a  fuse relay 30  amp  they said  would be best my question is  what gaudge  wire needed to battery connections

 

 

appreciate the input thanks

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I  purchased my  self some magnum mag10stx cannons im  going  to install a  fuse relay 30  amp  they said  would be best my question is  what gaudge  wire needed to battery connections

 

 

appreciate the input thanks

post-159772-0-06482900-1458857584_thumb.jpg

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I would suggest 10 gauge wire

X2

Nothing smaller than 10 gauge. A old set of jumper cables with ends cut off work great for running distance

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I ran 6 wire from battery to a fuse panel (Bluesea) in the rear of the boat then ran each rigger off of that panel on separate fuses.

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I powered junction block right to battery via main switch. Fused here and then fused each wire running to the junction block. Neat and clean and only one connection to battery.

Sent from my XT1080 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Lakebound88 did it the right way. No smaller than 10AWG. That means less resistance. Copper strand wire, heat shrink tubing on all connections, triple shrink to be sure. I have stereo cables I could build myself that cost hundreds, the hot, neutral, ground wires are braided together like a ponytail to pull on. Twist your wires tight together in case a foot or a stretch event happens, like a twizzler or rope, heat shrink each single wire connection , and then again for a double wire connection. Just let the single connect shrink hang out a 1/2" on each end. You won't worry about any wire till you have to scrub the battery terminals. A power block is so handy to tap into. Bailed me out many times when something thinks for itself.

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I wired mine like firechief mentioned. 6 gauge wire to 6 fuse block mounted on transom. 10 gauge wire to each rigger. I used the cannon ports mounted on the gunwales and riggers on pedestal swivels. I had issues with the low profile swivel bases that came with the riggers. post-152890-14588986426636_thumb.jpg

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Agree with TileMan Dan. Run eight gauge from Battery to fuse switch panel. Ten gauge to each after and follow fieromx3 shared chart for long-run wire gauge suggestion. Add all amp draws, add 5-10 and use that fuse or circuit breaker at battery (7 to 8" from positive post) to the eight gauge main.

 

For me, I open the connector and sand (diamond grit 100), then enclose the wire, add appropriate heat shrink tubing, crimp and solder the connection. (Forget the pen solder type, use a weller or something made to heat heavy meat connectors), then position and heat the the heat shrink tubing. I always have a main fuse at battery positive as said above, and the rated fuse per item before the on/off switch. Have never had a problem.

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Firechief48

   

Posted March 24, 2016 - 8:43 PM

I ran 6 wire from battery to a fuse panel (Bluesea) in the rear of the boat then ran each rigger off of that panel on separate fuses.

 

 

X2 !!

 

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Cannon's STX manual states 10 gauge wire is used if the run is 0-15'. But...when measuring that run we have to measure the run from the battery to the load and then back again. So for example, if you need 8' of wire to get from your battery to the rigger, you have to double that number for the return trip from the rigger to the battery. 16' would call for 8 gauge wire per Cannon's manual.

http://www.cannondownriggers.com/uploadedFiles/Service/Product_Manuals/3397130rh_Magnum_Combined.pdf

 

The manual also states to fuse the riggers at or near the battery so I went with Blue Seas ST Blade Battery Terminal Fuse Block Kit

https://www.bluesea.com/products/5024/ST_Blade_Battery_Terminal_Mount_Fuse_Block_Kit

 

I found this youtube from Jamestown Distributors helpful

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zd8af95HK68

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Having a bit of trouble understanding that, Thun. Not suggesting your thoughts and links are wrong. Just there and back part? If U can elaborate a bit that I can make the connection in your thought. Thanks.

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Sorry for the confusion RSF, it's that offensive lineman thing again! A circuit sends current from the positive terminal on your 12V battery to your 30A rigger via a red positive wire. The black negative wire on your rigger completes the circuit when connected to the negative terminal on your battery. So to determine what gauge wire to use, we have to measure the total length of wire run from the battery to the rigger and back to the battery. So if I need 7' of wire to get to my rigger (red wire), I need another 7' (black wire) to "get back" to the battery. The total length of run is 14' to complete the circuit and that's the number you would use to find the correct gauge to use. I hope that helps explain my thinking and please do feel free to correct my post if I've erred. I was just trying to make the point that determining the right gauge wire is important for safety reasons and trying to explain how to figure that out.

Edited by Thun

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current only flows when a device, in this case the down rigger calls for power thus the heavier wire is needed to carry the amperage from the battery to the device. The neg returns the residual back to the battery completing the circuit but not as much as the draw from the pos side. Think of it as water, if the faucet isn't open then nothing flows.

Edited by Firechief48

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Hi all,

Yes Thun that's a given since unlike an automobile there isn't a body ground for all dc accessories (Down-rigger(s)).. well perhaps the gauge panel for low voltage neg return in some cases.

Got confused as I was thinking any run for dc devices require a negative return.. sort of automatic-two wires on any run. Would add there are tables on the internet of what gauge is required depending on the length of the run and amperage rating of the rigger or other devices alone or sharing the same power line.

Would also add, the longer the run the more inefficient DC power becomes which I would suggest would come into play for those smaller outboards boats w/out a charging system or the 5-8 amp charge rate at almost full throttle - types.

Thanks.

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