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when you say top line I think you talking about the main line . I use 50 lb braid to the first bead chain and same line between beads chains the last bead chain to the coastal snap swivel I use 30 lb mono for a brake away . I just got a spool of bulk wire thinking  about changing one rod to it to try it out  but did all three rods has  new braid last year . I been out on a another guys boat and his rods were lead core for main line mono between beads chains the blow back on the line were way to much for me

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Grew up using single strand copper as our rod line until the first leader then handlined them into boxes for the rigs. Noo thanks

Sent from my XT1080 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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A million ways to do it but for the last 40 or 50 years I've tried most of them and then each time go back to "old school" stainless 7 strand 30-60 lb (60 a little better for fleas than the 30lb during the height of flea season) wire with a 30 lb mono rig line and I use 12 lb fluoro leaders attached with wire spring connectors at the rig end hooked to bead chain swivels on the mono rig line and ball bearing swivels on the lure end. I've experimented with different spacing as well and for the past 30 years (20-25 ft is most commonly used by others) but I have used 12 ft intervals for my 10 bead chains so that depending on the season and what I'm fishing for in particular or which lures I use I can adjust them for either the 12 intervals or 24 ft and still have room for a jug if I want to run it that way. That way I can go even into about 60 ft of water without getting hung up (12 ft intervals) or I can fish out deep and go deeper for lakers if I wish. Normally I only fish for lakers during derbies so  I run my stuff toward the top 75 ft (especially the jug rigs) most of the time to avoid lakers).. Stainless wire cuts thorough the water much better than leadcore and dacron but not as well as braid but it is much more durable than either. I've had a couple of my rigs used with the same wire but different rig lines for over 30 years. You need to take care with crimps but other than that it is pretty foolproof. I use Penn 309's with power handles on 6 1/2 ft Roller rods. I use from 24 -40 oz weights depending on whether they are used as side or down rods or jug lines for rainbows/landlock or browns(24-32 oz). I generally run 3-4 rigs with 5 leaders each. In the old days we ran 4 rigs with 15 leaders each as the regs permitted it back then if single hooks were used on the spoons (max 15 points per line then not max 5 lures or leader as now). This would entail 2 side rigs  and two jug rigs run in tandem about 50-150 ft apart. I also glue the rig line knot connections with Seal All glue to prevent possible knot failures. I coat all my sinkers with black Plasti Dip so that they don't mar up the boat and I don't have to actually handle lead (just in case I lose a fish and suck my thumb while upset) :lol: . The wire spring connectors I make myself and they are larger than the ones you can buy because they are easier to handle in cold weather especially with the beads I add for grip.If you are a Finger Lakes person and want to get set up using Seth Green rigs I suggest you check with Fishy Business near Keuka Lake State Park. He has all the stuff in his tackle shop and is very knowledgeable and heavily experienced with Seth Greens. Fishy is also here on Lou so contact him for current hours etc. In the bead chain pic you'll notice that there are different sizes and strengths of bead chains as well as a couple different types that employ clevices to attach your connector to so you need to know whether they will clear the rod tip and eyes. I use a threeway swivel at the very end of the rig line for the first leader to be attached as well as the sinker suspended about 2 ft on a 20-25 lb  mono drop line (so if you get hung on bottom it will break away first saving the rest of your stuff) My thermoclining buddies Admiral Byrd and Hop (who are major ball busters) have somewhat different approaches which are just as successful and mine is only one way to do it.

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Edited by Sk8man
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I rest my case as far as Hop being a major buster....there is the proof in black and white :lol: .

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Fishy -I probably should sometimes Gerry :lol:

 

tangled 456 - A jug or float rig is where rather than having your rod lines going down at the sides of the boat you instead attach a float of some type to the top bead chain of your rig line so that that it floats that entire setup out in back and away from the boat and your other lines (leaders etc.) It is called a jug rig because some folks use empty milk jugs or empty Clorox bottles while I use large orange styrofoam floats something like used on commercial seines or nets at the top and painted orange for good visibility. I have seen all sorts of things used for example foam duck decoys with rudders that place them off to the sides as well..  When you use multiple jug rigs you have to be very careful to keep them adequately spaced so they don't tangle and be careful to make very gradual wide turns to keep from tangles. Also when you get a fish on the far jug rig ((you set your drag properly so you can tell when a fish hits and watch your rod tip) you have to be careful when that rig is pulled in past the other rig which you often let out further so they pass each other but it depends on exactly how they have been set up distance wise etc. It sounds more complicated than it actually is. The best way to learn this particular stuff is to go with someone who knows what they are doing and watch them. (and yes I only run three rigs when I go solo) :lol:

Edited by Sk8man
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It is a multiple leader (up to 5 maximum now) trolling system with the leaders spaced apart (often 20-25 ft apart) used primarily for deep water trolling for trout and salmon. A 2 -4 lb weight is at the bottom of it and a variety of depths can be trolled at a single time with just one setup so that you can have 5 lures going through say 100ft at a time. It is very effective  and especially when the thermocline forms in the lakes as it can be set up to cover above below and within the thermocline itself maximizing your potential for fish of various targeted species. The Seth Green was named for it's originator who fished it first on Keuka lake in the 1800's and it is also called a "thermocline rig" or just plain "rig". He also started the first trout fish hatchery (Caledonia. NY I believe). Some folks refer to it as "meat fishing"  and various other names and sometimes in a derogatory way and they sometimes say it isn't worth doing because you can't feel the fish (especially small ones) with the heavy sinker and rods etc. but my suspicion is that most of those people haven't even tried it, don't understand how to actually do it, or are too lazy to do it (it does entail some work) because it is truly a lot of fun and one of my favorite ways to fish out of all the fresh and salt water fishing techniques.

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The 50 braid does a great job cutting through the water but I have lost two entire rig lines made of it with all the equipment attached so that was it for me....I just don't trust it for that particular application never any problem with the other setups but some of my buddies prefer braid and it works for them (sort of like the downrigger issue of braid vs. wire you need to have confidence in whatever you use). I also think it may be a bit more important if you do a lot of deep fishing (over 100-150 ft or more) in that braid reduces "blowback"  but within my major range above that it isn't much of a problem I just use heavier sinker if needed..

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We learned to use rigs on Owasco with my grandfather. I use them now since my boat is not set up to be able to use other methods and have had to be creative with rod holders. Fun to try to hand line a big landlock or bow and if by yourself to net as well.

Any read on Seth is fascinating as Iron Duke mentioned. He obviously did not have electronics or 21 aisles of fishing gear at the local store to chose from. He needed to study the fish and learn how to "fish".

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