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Seneca lake becoming salt water?


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I would have to wonder how much salting the roads during winter has an effect on the lake, before I'd think the salt mines are to blame. There is an awefull lot of salt used on all the roads around seneca as well as other lakes. Trouble with that theory is they don't study the other lakes like they do Seneca.I would bet they are all getting higher levels of salinity.

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Interesting I sent some communication to the senior professor there telling him about how the formation of the belhurst hole has dramatically changed /shifted You can see 200ft depths where it used to be only 135 ft depths. I was thinking something let loose.

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Makes sense, I've never seen the numbers or the size of the alewives like I have the past few years. They are a type of herring I believe which means they thrive in the saltier water

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I actually did a study on this..... The runoff from the roads is not to blame, Seneca lake is naturally salty because of the salt within the bedrock strata. Of course the Salt plants are leeching into the water and that is one of the problems. The biggest problem in Seneca is from runoff from the agricultural business, the excess phosphates and nitrates from fertilizer are being put into the lake causing more and more algal blooms.  which in-turn make the lake eutrophic,  this can be avoided by adding more riparian buffer zones along the Tributaries.  It is sad to see what man can do to a natural resource in only 200 years.

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Fact Sheet

What’s in Your Wine?



People like to think of wine as “just grapes.†But there is a lot more in your wine glass than fermented grapes. For example, yeast is added to aid fermentation. Salts, sugars and acids may be added to control and direct the fermentation process. When we compare the differences between organically-certified wine, wine made with organic grapes, and conventionally-made wine, we need to look at how many chemicals are added and where they come from.

Small amounts of compounds called sulfites are present in all wine, whether it is certified organic, made with organic grapes, or conventionally made. Sulfites, used as a preservative, can be added to all wines at the discretion of the winemaker, even in very small amounts to organically-certified wine.

When making conventional wine, literally hundreds of chemicals can be and are used, not just added sulfites. Some conventional winemakers add sugar, oak chips and flavor agents. On the other hand, (or in the other glass) wine that is certified organic is allowed to have about 70 chemicals added to it, including organic and naturally occurring acids, salts, and enzymes. However, unlike in conventionally produced wine, any chemical used in a certified-organic wine cannot have an adverse effect on the environment or on human health as defined by the Food and Drug Administration.  Source: The National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances, issued by the National Organic Program (NOP).

Out in the fields where wine grapes are grown, the differences between organic and conventional wine are a lot easier to explain. Conventionally-grown wine grapes can be treated with synthetic pesticides, fungicides and insecticides. Organically-grown grapes cannot be treated with any synthetic pesticides, fungicides, insecticides, or fertilizers.

According to the California Department of Pesticides Regulation, in 2010 25 million pounds of pesticides were applied to conventionally-grown wine grapes in California. That was a 19% pesticide increase from the year before. Conventionally-grown wine grapes received more pesticides than almonds, table grapes, tomatoes or strawberries. Insecticide use increased by 34% and acreage treated with sulfur, a fungicide, increased by 21%.

The Pesticide Action Network (PAN) classifies about a million pounds of those chemicals dispersed on wine grapes as “bad actors,†meaning that they are known or probable causes of cancer, are neurotoxins, or groundwater contaminants.

Roundup, a herbicide, is widely used on wine grapes in conventional farming. A recent studyhas linked Roundup with health dangers, including Parkinson’s, infertility, and cancers.

In 2010, more than 400,000 pounds of Roundup (known as Glyphosate to the trade) were applied to wine grapes.



What Levels of Pesticides Actually End Up in Your Wine?

There have been several studies that have that examined pesticide persistence in wine grapes. According to pesticide studies most often cited by scientists, fungicides, when applied in the fields, tend to dissipate in the grapes and are present in varying levels in finished wine. While pesticides such as mepanipyrim, fluazinam and chlorpyrifos were not detected in the finished wine, pesticides such as myclobutanil and tetraconazole persisted during the winemaking process. Some pesticides such as azoxystrobin, dimethoate, pyrimethanil were extremely persistent. In fact, their residual concentrations in bottled wine were similar to initial concentrations on the grapes.

 

 Is the Pesticide Dosage Harmful in Conventionally-Made Wine?

Researchers try to assess pesticide exposure by means of two measurements. One is called the No Observed Effect Level (NOEL), which is the highest dose of a chemical that does not provide an adverse biological effect. The other is called the RfD or reference dose. RfD, which is derived from NOEL, is an estimate of the daily lifetime exposure of a chemical on the human population, including sensitive subgroups, which is not likely to cause harm. The EPA uses RfD as a reference point from which to gauge the potential effects of chemicals at varying doses.

According to studies in 1996 and 2000, out of 12 fungicides commonly used on wine grapes, six of them may persist in the finished wine in amounts that exceed the safe reference dose. Among the nine pesticides commonly used on wine grapes, five of them exceeded the safe reference dose, and three exceeded both the safe reference dose and the NOEL. Among the eight remaining pesticides most commonly used on wine grapes, three exceeded the safe reference dose determined by researchers.

A study found that European wines were also systematically contaminated with pesticide residues. Decanter magazine reported that ninety percent of French wine samples contained traces of at least one pesticide. It’s important to note that pesticide levels detected in the wines tested were “below threshold levels of toxicity,†the European researchers said. But they also pointed out that “we should not forget that it is not the consumers who are most impacted by this, but the vineyard workers who are applying the treatments.â€

No pesticides are ever added to certified organic wine grapes.

 

 

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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I actually did a study on this..... The runoff from the roads is not to blame, Seneca lake is naturally salty because of the salt within the bedrock strata. Of course the Salt plants are leeching into the water and that is one of the problems. The biggest problem in Seneca is from runoff from the agricultural business, the excess phosphates and nitrates from fertilizer are being put into the lake causing more and more algal blooms.  which in-turn make the lake eutrophic,  this can be avoided by adding more riparian buffer zones along the Tributaries.  It is sad to see what man can do to a natural resource in only 200 years.

Could you please explain to me how the salt plants leech into the lake? And also, what background do you have to justify what your claiming!

Here's what I'm seeing. 3 people who have no profile pictures and a hand full of posts, all blaming this or that for " destroying" Seneca. I haven't bothered to check your other posts, but I can and might. Beyond all that if you say, as the first fella did and I quote, " I spoke to Hobart ( lower case letters) and" you know the rest... Well, who was it you spoke to? Come on now, we see nonsense for what it is here...

As for what frogger said, I wasn't aware of that till he posted it. I'd be curious what that's all about, but at the same time, sink holes are not uncommon and is there salt being mined in that area? That I don't know.

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Fact Sheet

What’s in Your Wine?



People like to think of wine as “just grapes.†But there is a lot more in your wine glass than fermented grapes. For example, yeast is added to aid fermentation. Salts, sugars and acids may be added to control and direct the fermentation process. When we compare the differences between organically-certified wine, wine made with organic grapes, and conventionally-made wine, we need to look at how many chemicals are added and where they come from.

Small amounts of compounds called sulfites are present in all wine, whether it is certified organic, made with organic grapes, or conventionally made. Sulfites, used as a preservative, can be added to all wines at the discretion of the winemaker, even in very small amounts to organically-certified wine.

When making conventional wine, literally hundreds of chemicals can be and are used, not just added sulfites. Some conventional winemakers add sugar, oak chips and flavor agents. On the other hand, (or in the other glass) wine that is certified organic is allowed to have about 70 chemicals added to it, including organic and naturally occurring acids, salts, and enzymes. However, unlike in conventionally produced wine, any chemical used in a certified-organic wine cannot have an adverse effect on the environment or on human health as defined by the Food and Drug Administration. Source: The National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances, issued by the National Organic Program (NOP).

Out in the fields where wine grapes are grown, the differences between organic and conventional wine are a lot easier to explain. Conventionally-grown wine grapes can be treated with synthetic pesticides, fungicides and insecticides. Organically-grown grapes cannot be treated with any synthetic pesticides, fungicides, insecticides, or fertilizers.

According to the California Department of Pesticides Regulation, in 2010 25 million pounds of pesticides were applied to conventionally-grown wine grapes in California. That was a 19% pesticide increase from the year before. Conventionally-grown wine grapes received more pesticides than almonds, table grapes, tomatoes or strawberries. Insecticide use increased by 34% and acreage treated with sulfur, a fungicide, increased by 21%.

The Pesticide Action Network (PAN) classifies about a million pounds of those chemicals dispersed on wine grapes as “bad actors,†meaning that they are known or probable causes of cancer, are neurotoxins, or groundwater contaminants.

Roundup, a herbicide, is widely used on wine grapes in conventional farming. A recent studyhas linked Roundup with health dangers, including Parkinson’s, infertility, and cancers.

In 2010, more than 400,000 pounds of Roundup (known as Glyphosate to the trade) were applied to wine grapes.



What Levels of Pesticides Actually End Up in Your Wine?

There have been several studies that have that examined pesticide persistence in wine grapes. According to pesticide studies most often cited by scientists, fungicides, when applied in the fields, tend to dissipate in the grapes and are present in varying levels in finished wine. While pesticides such as mepanipyrim, fluazinam and chlorpyrifos were not detected in the finished wine, pesticides such as myclobutanil and tetraconazole persisted during the winemaking process. Some pesticides such as azoxystrobin, dimethoate, pyrimethanil were extremely persistent. In fact, their residual concentrations in bottled wine were similar to initial concentrations on the grapes.

Is the Pesticide Dosage Harmful in Conventionally-Made Wine?

Researchers try to assess pesticide exposure by means of two measurements. One is called the No Observed Effect Level (NOEL), which is the highest dose of a chemical that does not provide an adverse biological effect. The other is called the RfD or reference dose. RfD, which is derived from NOEL, is an estimate of the daily lifetime exposure of a chemical on the human population, including sensitive subgroups, which is not likely to cause harm. The EPA uses RfD as a reference point from which to gauge the potential effects of chemicals at varying doses.

According to studies in 1996 and 2000, out of 12 fungicides commonly used on wine grapes, six of them may persist in the finished wine in amounts that exceed the safe reference dose. Among the nine pesticides commonly used on wine grapes, five of them exceeded the safe reference dose, and three exceeded both the safe reference dose and the NOEL. Among the eight remaining pesticides most commonly used on wine grapes, three exceeded the safe reference dose determined by researchers.

A study found that European wines were also systematically contaminated with pesticide residues. Decanter magazine reported that ninety percent of French wine samples contained traces of at least one pesticide. It’s important to note that pesticide levels detected in the wines tested were “below threshold levels of toxicity,†the European researchers said. But they also pointed out that “we should not forget that it is not the consumers who are most impacted by this, but the vineyard workers who are applying the treatments.â€

No pesticides are ever added to certified organic wine grapes.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Lake Ontario United mobile app

I quit reading when the " study " you refered to classified sugar, sulfiets, oak chips and flavoring as " chemicals"

"Flash words " don't do it for me. Didn't take me long to see where they were going and facts were not involved. Unless stretching the truth suits you? And by the way... Referencing studies done prior to the banned use of certain products today is also not sitting well here!

I knew somehow " save Seneca lake " had a hand in this post...

Edited by Great Lakes Lure Maker
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Most of us who have and do spend their life around the lakes of NY, especially Seneca are well aware of the studies from Hobart. It wasn't your topic that got me going, but how fast we went from a conversation about salt, to organic grapes... I understand the salinity may be gaining, but I would bet salting the roads is a better reason than salt mines. Then they drag in the grape industry...

You are right, if I'm to believe what I also have heard and read, but these other fellas tried to hijack it.. And turn it into something other than the truth!

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So now your telling me that zebra mussel's have not cleared the water of Seneca lake, but in fact its become more "greener"? We all know during summer the lakes " turn" and become greener. But it has never been clearer than it is now.

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Save Seneca Lake does not have a hand in this. I have no use for the wineries because there's a bad accident every week on one side of the lake or the other and people are being airlifted the hospitals. Because of drinking at our wineries.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Lake Ontario United mobile app

Whoa... I must be missing something here!

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yeah something goods going on there huge Browns..

Captain1466

Our weekend was great! Dropping 6-7 lb browns, 5-6 lb rainbows and 9 lb Lakers every day is a sign of a good fishery! Just take a look st the leader board and tell me the fishery on Seneca isn't solid! If I saw one issue to be dealt with it was lamprey control. They are out of hand...

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Not the wineries fault people drink and drive... that's their decision, if they pull out in front me me because they are plastered, thats their choice. I believe the state police and locals do a good job ensuring safe roads. Those roads are just busy and accidents haopen

Sent from my XT1080 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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