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Chinook Chaser

Streaking to the rigger

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Out today and had a ton of fish streak up to look at my riggers but yet wouldn't take it. Had a mix of ff and spoons out. We did try different speeds and directions. Any suggestions would be great!

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Dan makes a great point. It is worth staggering your lures  to the extreme sometimes when the streaking occurs (along with varying the speeds turns etc.) with something set further than your usual distance and something close to the ball. Whenever this happens to me I think in terms of them either not seeing the right action of the spoon or fly or maybe the fact that the distance/action indicates something unnatural in the setup. It could be for example that when the spoon or fly is closer to the ball they perceive it as a natural "unit" eg. the ball and turbulence or vibrations of the weight being something like a school of bait moving through the water and the "tag along" (lure) as being wounded or vulnerable and the closeness or proximity of it as being more "natural" to them.  If set at a long distance on the other hand the lure may be perceived as a loner bait wounded and struggling and vulnerable after the turbulence and vibrations of the weight and prop commotion etc. goes by. Obviously this is total speculation but making these adjustments when the streaking happens often works. It can also be a good time to change out your spoons or flies :)

Edited by Sk8man

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Occasionally bringing your rigger up a few feet when they streak can trigger a strike

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If you don't have a temp and speed unit, you may not have had your speed right. Fish have seen lures this late in the game and many have experience getting stuck so consider the real thing i.e. Meat to sweeten the pot

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What rigger weights are you using? I use to have a lot more streakers and lookers when I used chrome sharks.

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Turn the boat. This will cause one side to pull away from the fish and the other to drop in to the fish's face. Normally the fast side will trigger strikes. I will often hear people say that the "fish hit when I turned" . There is a reason for that. Think of it when you shake a toy in front of a cat. The cat only strikes when you pull the toy away. Especially on calm days I will sometimes do figures eights to get the rods popping. Old trick I learned from Dave Agness (King Davy) when I was slipped next to him in Wilson.

Edited by A-Lure-A

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This is all great info and I thank everyone who contributed. About those turns: would you go kinda like 45 degrees or farther/less far?

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If you ice fish with a flasher/fish finder you realize the importance of the cat and mouse game. Letting a bait stay stationary for large gamefish like Walleye and Lake Trout through the ice will result in a lot of lookers. Taking the bait away from them creates a sense of urgency and many times it triggers a bite. You can do this with your downriggers, and anyone who's been in my boat witnesses this all day long. Our riggers are constantly moving into fish or getting pulled away from fish to utilize the same concept we use while ice fishing. My favorite set to chase fish is a Mupped (reg spoon with mag spoon cheated above it 10') rigger. 

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I learned it from Rick now I am always working the riggers up and down to create that game of chase. It is definitely a strategy that everyone should be using

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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I like a hard turn when I see streakers. Rocking the boat is fun but not effective in my experience...

Edited by alex1young

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It help to be  routinely doing "S" patterns and turning along with changes in speed> I sometimes even take the boat out of gear periodically and they may slam it when it is re-engaged. As Rick mentioned it can be enticing to have the bait pulled away from them. I think it probably acts as a stimulus as in other predator prey relationships (e.g. lion, tiger, bear etc. quickly going after something that runs away from it)

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Here's something that goes against the common thinking. When you want your rigger weights to speed up, you slow the boat abruptly. The pendulum effect speeds the bait and ball. Watch your down speed on a deep rigger, and you will see it increase speed as it swings closer to the boat. You might find the extra speed at the ball is the key. And maybe run the boat a couple tenths faster. Mupped rigs do work for streakers like Rick said. Get them to notice a big flashy spoon up above the ball. They don't always hit that spoon but as they drop back they see the second chance smaller meal coming over the shoulder.

Sent from my SM-N900P using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Streakers usually meal fish looking at your weight so shorten them up.  Rick's advice is solid - definitely mup rig!

 

Tom B.

(LongLine)

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Anyone pop the release and let the spoon rise on streakers?

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I will pop the release on streakers if I find none are hitting. I also pop them when I want to change my lures to let the bait slowly rise to the top before reeling it in. You would be surprised how many fish I catch this way. I also lower and raise the ball often. I have also lowered the ball on a streaker that came up, looked and went back down if I have my bait is trailing far behind the ball. My theory is that they are active why they came and looked in the first place so maybe if I can get my bait in their face, it may trigger a strike. It works enough for me to keep doing it (although it could be that another fish was following and the sudden change in the depth and speed triggered that fish to bite). Another trick I have found works well is whenever I see a streaker dropping back down, I quickly raise the ball about 10ft. The quick burst of speed (works better with spoons I find) of the bait sometimes gets to turn around and come up and hit the bait hard. What ever your method, I think changes in depth and speed helps on the slower days.

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I will pop the release on streakers if I find none are hitting. I also pop them when I want to change my lures to let the bait slowly rise to the top before reeling it in. You would be surprised how many fish I catch this way.

 

Absolutely!

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I have also had luck in that situation by pegging the throttle for a couple of seconds.  A quick boost to 4 mph or so seems to get more hits .  I assume it is same as above in the fact that the bait is thought to be escaping

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Anyone pop the release and let the spoon rise on streakers?

 

No, I know this is a common thing on Erie for Walleye, but once you pop the release it's game over unless the fish strikes. Now you have to reset. In my opinion moving your riggers up and down will create the same effect.

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The time to do it is when the fleas and/or weeds  are thick and you need to check your lines and when you are going to change lures anyway. Just pop them and let them flutter to the surface (with spoons). Otherwise Rick has a good point.

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I had this happen to me last year out in front of 9 mile pt. was driving me nuts. I should have brought the lures closer to the ball I think I had them between 15 feet and 7 feet.

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