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Trolled just west of Ginna and on my way in found a mooring buoy and blue bumper locked to the bottom.  Normally not a big deal but was in 73ft.  Also noticed a large mound underneath on FF 20-30 ft high.  I would think a marker that far out should be much higher than a mooring buoy and would love to know if anyone has any info. 

 

Btw, marked them but no takers 100-150 off Bear Creek. We'll be out this evening.

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Sounds like somebody wanted to mark that structure. Shouldn't be there, can cause damage to lower unit .

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If you were West of the nuke plant, it is most likely an old Coast Guard boat  #56022 sunk in 1977 laying on the bottom. The same markers are also about 1/2 mile out of Hughes Marina 5 or so miles east of the plant. Them markers are marking the St. Peter sunk in 1898 in 117' of water. The local dive shops mark them so they can tie off and take people diving on the wrecks. There is another in between these two called the Homer Warren sunk in 1919 not sure if it is marked.

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Here is a video of the St. Peter wreck. It is a chain from the bottom to the top. The buoy is about 3/4 the size of a 100lb propane tank. Look at all the dipsys, dodgers, snubbers, flys and downrigger cable on that chain.

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Ya I understand the diver down flag. But I did find two items regarding wrecks.

CCHAPTER 6 - MARKING OF WRECKS A. Marking Policy. 1. General . a. 33 USC 409 requires that whenever a vessel, raft, or other craft is wrecked and sunk in navigable waters of the United States, it must be marked for the protection of marine traffic. The law requires that the owner, lessee, or operator of such a wreck "immediately mark it with a buoy or beacon during the day and, unless otherwise granted a waiver by the Commandant of the Coast Guard, a light at night." 14 USC 86 authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security to mark for the protection of navigation any sunken vessel or other obstruction existing on the navigable waters or waters above the continental shelf of the United States for as long as required to meet the needs of maritime navigation. As a matter of policy therefore, wreck markings established by the Coast Guard, whether for an agency of the Federal Government or in response to a request of the owner, shall provide no lesser degree of service and protection to the mariner than that required of the owner. b. Wreck markings established and maintained by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) shall have at least one lighted aid in all cases, unless specifically exempted by the District Commander. The waiver request must clearly indicate that placing a light would be impractical and granting such a waiver would not create an undue hazard to navigation. It is recognized, however, that circumstances may not permit the establishment of a lighted buoy immediately. In such cases, unlighted aids may serve temporarily until such time as a lighted aid can be established. Alternate means to satisfy this marking requirement include the presence of a manned vessel while the hazardous condition remains. c. Radar beacons (racons) may also be used to mark wrecks in addition to the aforementioned requirements.

Just hope no misses the bumper and catches the rope on their lower unit

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jckjr8, Those rules are referring to situations where there is a sunken vessel that will present a navigation hazard if it is not marked. Where another vessel may hit the sunken vessel while navigating through the area.

 

The sunken vessels discussed here do not present a navigation hazard and are not required to be marked by a buoy. The buoys have been placed by dive shops in order to easily locate the sunken vessels to dive on. This raises the question of what are the requirements for this type of marker in open waters? Or are they even allowed and do they require a permit? Best to ask the local coast guard about them.

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Here is a video of the St. Peter wreck. It is a chain from the bottom to the top. The buoy is about 3/4 the size of a 100lb propane tank. Look at all the dipsys, dodgers, snubbers, flys and downrigger cable on that chain.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aoB1IAPPQg

What an awesome video. It must be exciting diving down like that.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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The "Laura Grace" is behind my home in @25 feet of water. This Summer there was a buoy out there, which was never there before. people went out in small boats to try and pull the buoy with no success. Good to know, if it happens next year, I can call the U.S.C.G. and check it out. By the way, I liked the video but, couldn't get out of my mind, the scene from Jaws where the guy appeared in the window of the wreck.    :o   Steve.....

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The "Laura Grace" is behind my home in @25 feet of water. This Summer there was a buoy out there, which was never there before. people went out in small boats to try and pull the buoy with no success. Good to know, if it happens next year, I can call the U.S.C.G. and check it out. By the way, I liked the video but, couldn't get out of my mind, the scene from Jaws where the guy appeared in the window of the wreck.    :o   Steve.....

Here is my side scan of the Laura Grace. I grew up on the south end of Long Pond (1970 - 1989 Shoreway Dr.). Been diving on that wreck since I got my first boat at age 7. I have a great video my friend goona bird made of it. Here is a side scan of it 1 month ago. Heading out there in about an hour. This was my first attempt with my new Lowrance side scan sonar.

 

13934771_1442733512420148_39514705321479

 

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 OMG! That's impressive!  Thanks for sharing that. It's quite a structure for Bass fishing, too! Sonar units have come a long way. I'm looking at 2 guys right now just off the creek mouth with a dive flag. Maybe it's you? They are pushing boats, even jet ski's in and out of the channel. The depth is knee deep, as you are probably aware of. Thanks again for the great video! Steve....."Be Safe!"

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New York State requires a floating object permit for something like that. They are fairly easy to obtain and the have standards they are supposed to follow

Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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Here is a video of the St. Peter wreck. It is a chain from the bottom to the top. The buoy is about 3/4 the size of a 100lb propane tank. Look at all the dipsys, dodgers, snubbers, flys and downrigger cable on that chain.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aoB1IAPPQg

Cool video, but really only one Dipsey with Flasher fly that I saw, if you run that over trolling, you arent paying attention. Probably why there isn't more or divers take them.

Sent from my XT1254 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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