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The discharge is 3 miles out in 100 fow according to the article. I wonder if that creates a dead zone or a feeding zone from the discharge and so far down current. It might be good to know the location to keep clear of it if you are keeping fish.

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16 minutes ago, muskiedreams said:

The discharge is 3 miles out in 100 fow according to the article. I wonder if that creates a dead zone or a feeding zone from the discharge and so far down current. It might be good to know the location to keep clear of it if you are keeping fish.

I used to have the crib at the end of their intake GPS coordinates.  I hung a rigger ball on it laker fishing years ago.  It was not pretty. 

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Don't worry Brian! This statement t should make you feel better.
"If there's good news in this saga, it’s that it's a huge water body," D'Amato said. "I can't imagine a tangible environmental impact coming out of this."
It's all good if you can't touch it. "Tangible" ...get it?
Anyway, they said that they disinfected the turds and man hole covers! Hmmm...always wondered what the strong smell of chlorine was coming from the last few years...now I know.

cent frum my notso smartphone

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The first thing that is done in wastewater treatment is solids removal.  If this were a break in a sewer main, talk of tampons would be justified (solid human waste generally gets broken up by the turbulence in the lateral between the toilet and the street main), but all this material has been grit screened to remove the plastics (and sticks and stones and Hotwheels or whatever else makes it into the pipes down deep) as a first step in treatment.  The next step is to hold the material in exposure to bacteria that digest the material further, breaking down relatively complex molecules into more simple ones, and oxidizing a lot of it before it hits Nature and depletes the available oxygen in the receiving body.  In this case the problems have been occurring in the Phosphorus removal steps, and aeration, and the solids that are going out with the nutrient stream are produced by microorganisms that are one part of the process, but are out of balance.  You should also realize that at FEV, the "normal"  treatment limit is ~200 mgd, but after serious rainstorms, flows can go as high as ~650 mgd.  The difference in general gets grit screened and chlorinated, but goes out the discharges with no further treatment.  These discharges are really not desirable, but the costs to build systems that would treat everything are astronomical.  It will be interesting to see what DEC can do to fix the problem.  The alternative will be a ban on defecation, I think you can guess how that will work!  

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The company I work for does contract work at that plant. There's nothing like working in or near the "cake off" building on a summer day. Rather be working in the morgue coolers.

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