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Gobies


jk1

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Gobies

What Finger lakes have them?  I saw the photo from Cayuga with the three from that lakers.  A friend told me he has them in the Delaware River between NJ and NY.  I am mainly a jigger so do not have much experience with them.  Do all the finger lakes have them?  Thanks......jk

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The best thing the small lakes , finger lakes have going for then is dams at there outlets. As long as they aren't transported into the lakes by someone or something, birds. Hopefully they lakes will stay free of them. I truly worry about water flees in the smaller lakes. Ease to transfer from water to water by bait wells, pipes etc.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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I have never seen a gobi in Owasco Lake. Next time you think that you found a gobi in a laker stomach, cut it open and check if there is a swim bladder. If you find it, then it is not a gobi, they do not have bladders. Spiny flees are plentiful in Owasco.

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The orangish color in some lakers flesh occasionally caught  in a number of the Finger Lakes (Cayuga, Seneca, Keuka and Canandaigua in my own experience) has been there long before the gobies arrived. I believe they are a different strain of laker possibly natives? One of the lakers favorite food has been the freshwater slimy sculpin which have been present in the lakes for eons. Lakers have even been observed turning over rocks on bottom in the shallows in search of them.

Edited by Sk8man
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If The lake is connected to the barge canal ,and there isn't a barrier to stop them, in time the gobies will get to that lake. They have made there way from Ontario to Cayuga and are on there way into Seneca. Just like the Zebra mussels.

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Gobies can get to Seneca through canal they just haven't yet. The locks at Seneca falls aren't easy for a fish to get through but it will happen eventually. 

 

Id be surprised if gobies are in owasco. As said before they look just like a native sculpin. Flesh color means nothing. the clipped and unclipped (stocked and wild) lakers I've kept show no consistent pattern of flesh color. Sometimes stocked ones are bright orange and wilds are white and vice versa. Maybe it has something to do with diet but like Sk8man said orange flesh has been around well before gobies. 

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I have been told (second hand) that in stocked stream trout if the meat is red it means they are being feed shrimp by products. So it is probably diet related, some lakers like mid water bait and others like the bottom guys????????

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On 3/31/2017 at 11:23 PM, Sk8man said:

The orangish color in some lakers flesh occasionally caught  in a number of the Finger Lakes (Cayuga, Seneca, Keuka and Canandaigua in my own experience) has been there long before the gobies arrived. I believe they are a different strain of laker possibly natives? One of the lakers favorite food has been the freshwater slimy sculpin which have been present in the lakes for eons. Lakers have even been observed turning over rocks on bottom in the shallows in search of them.

I have not been doing this anyways near the time Sk8 has but agree .

What I have seen is fish with or without fin clipped have orange meat. To me these are the best eating.

If I'm looking for one to eat I look for the fin tips to be colored ( white with a bit of orange ) also the skin is darker. Alec on here always said the orange meat color came from them eating mystic shrimp......

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