Kevin J Legg

Thoughts on slot limit on SLR walleyes

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Kevin did he mention anything about the lake walleye spawnings, just curious, for the most part the lake spawners are on the way out already, before the season opens. But if spawning habitats could be improved that would be something we all could get involved in. Keeping those damn gobies from destroying or eating the eggs would be a godsent!! Thanks for looking into this:yes:.  PAP

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Black River and Chaumont River both have significant spawning. They have already put gravel in Chaumont to improve spawning success. I'm also certain that many of the lake walleyes migrate to Quinte and spawn their tributaries. He also believe that since perch and walleye spawn early (March/April) the gobies are still in deep water and don't have the same affect as on the bass which spawn much latter (May/June) That leads to better recruitment for the walleye and perch and a decrease in bass numbers.


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2 hours ago, Kevin J Legg said:

Black River and Chaumont River both have significant spawning. They have already put gravel in Chaumont to improve spawning success. I'm also certain that many of the lake walleyes migrate to Quinte and spawn their tributaries. He also believe that since perch and walleye spawn early (March/April) the gobies are still in deep water and don't have the same affect as on the bass which spawn much latter (May/June) That leads to better recruitment for the walleye and perch and a decrease in bass numbers.


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:yes: Thanks, Kevin, I never really thought about the water temp being a factor in the gobies activities.

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Whatever happened to raising walleyes in Cape Vincent? Somewhere in the past I recall that this was going to be done but did not meet NYS DEC approval? That would be an awesome if that could get up and running!!!

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I wouldn’t say that the larger girls are less fertile. They don’t have the number of eggs as the slightly younger ones but their eggs have a higher viability.


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I used to be a member of Lake Ontario Fisheries Coalition and I believe that the hatchery in Cape Vincent was closed due to state budget cuts when Gov Paterson took over. I could be wrong but im pretty sure that was the reason why. A lot of time and money was invested in kents creek. I would support a slot limit or reduced creel. IMO the big ones are good for pics, but im not against anyone who takes any size fish that is legal.


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Holy moly a cut in creel limit we are at three now. If anything something should be done with the ice fisherman creel limits. But then again for some that is the only way to get out that far and they live for the ice. I guess until it becomes a noticeable problem let it status quo!!

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I see Niagara River has a one walleye a day over 18" limit from January 1-March 15 to protect the large spawn laden females. Sounds like a great idea for Lake Ontario and the St Lawrence River.


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I’d be game for that rule!! The ice fisherman do well with the eyes. Maybe to well, but then you have to remember those who don’t boat, just ice fish, now your punishing those guys to have better open lake fishing, that’s not right either!!

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I’d be game for that rule!! The ice fisherman do well with the eyes. Maybe to well, but then you have to remember those who don’t boat, just ice fish, now your punishing those guys to have better open lake fishing, that’s not right either!!

Don't feel like that is punishing ice fisherman by limiting egg laden females if it preserves the resource. Would be willing to change the open water regulation if it's needed. It's all about a sustainable harvest for future generations.


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Yea, I don’t like the idea of taking the bigger or even the most fertile size female eyes out of the water system period!! It’s everyones lake who buys a license whether it’s local or out of state. I don’t know how you would go about this situation. I love to come up and try my hand at getting a eye through the ice, but I’d put all the ladies back? But that’s me. 

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Perhaps the easiest way is to encourage individuals to release the bigger spawners and keep the eaters. Many are already doing just that. Similar to encouraging people to let small bucks walk.


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I agree 100% with Kevin. Its all about sustaining for future generations...Kevin is also dead on with his statement about gobies being in deeper water. Should we be concerned about the vast number of white perch found in the bays? Ive read articles about how they prey on walleye fry and they seem to stick around the bays year round or up in the rivers... if anyone fishes BRB or Guffins or Chaumont in the summer they will tell you that there are tons of white perch. Good size ones too. Just makes me wonder if they are having an effect on recruitment? 

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I can tell you they are a pain in the ass. We switched from worm harnesses, to the scorpion size that worked about a half hour, then we bumped the speed up, no changes other than changing out silver fish for a clean spoon. That failed also, so we switched to the super slim spoons and Berkeley lures. That’s the best idea we came up with?? 

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There is absolutely no reason for slot size, catch limits or restrictions on native fish populations. Education on fish takes is very important but just set your catch take on your personal needs. Complaints about fish restrictions usually are started in "Mahogany Ridge" [bar rooms] not professional biologists. Our biggest problems today is the under harvest of species such as perch that forage on the fry and fingerlings of walleye. These do gooders have screwed up more fishing opportunity with their size and catch limits. Limits are fine for stream stocked fishery programs but limits on large lakes do not work. Hook and line fishing never over harvested any fishery as harvest activity stops when production falls. Nature will take its course, if you feel there is a problem stop taking walleyes, etc. on your own. Concentrate on taking perch that are a bigger control on the walleye biomass.

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9 hours ago, jimski2 said:
Quote

There is absolutely no reason for slot size, catch limits or restrictions on native fish populations. Education on fish takes is very important but just set your catch take on your personal needs. Complaints about fish restrictions usually are started in "Mahogany Ridge" [bar rooms] not professional biologists. Our biggest problems today is the under harvest of species such as perch that forage on the fry and fingerlings of walleye. These do gooders have screwed up more fishing opportunity with their size and catch limits. Limits are fine for stream stocked fishery programs but limits on large lakes do not work. Hook and line fishing never over harvested any fishery as harvest activity stops when production falls. Nature will take its course, if you feel there is a problem stop taking walleyes, etc. on your own. Concentrate on taking perch that are a bigger control on the walleye .


Jimski2,
I respectfully disagree with much of what you have said. I believe the slot limit on the Bay of Quinte has been highly effective in restoring their walleye populations. I have also talked with with fisheries biologists, taught high school biology for many years, and don't regularly visit "Mahogany Ridge". Not sure how much time you spend on the SLR and Lake Ontario fishing walleyes but it is currently a tremendous fishery and I've seen a vast decrease in the pike and bass populations here in the last 30 years and think being proactive on the walleye population is reasonable.
I agree that there are many factors other than hook and line harvest that can affect fish populations particularly degradation of habitat and invasive species. Yearly spawn conditions also can have a huge impact on recruitment.
I certainly don't consider myself a do gooder and in fact harvest many fish each year. That said, I'd personally rather error on a conservative approach to insure this great fisheries is available for future generation. I'd prefer not to wait till production falls and wait for nature to take its course and retain a reasonable sustainable harvest.


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I run the walleye stocking program in ogdensburg. I wouldn’t worry about the perch eating eggs and what not. When we shock the river it’s full of suckers following the walleye to eat the eggs. If anyone wants to witness the shocking of the river I usually know about 3 days in advance. We have to monitor the river and call the best time to shock it before we call th dec.  We are always looking for help !!

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I run the walleye stocking program in ogdensburg. I wouldn’t worry about the perch eating eggs and what not. When we shock the river it’s full of suckers following the walleye to eat the eggs. If anyone wants to witness the shocking of the river I usually know about 3 days in advance. We have to monitor the river and call the best time to shock it before we call th dec.  We are always looking for help !!

Please let me know how I can assist. I have a couple other retired friends that I'm sure would also volunteer. Send a PM and I will give you my phone number or simple send me a PM when we can help.


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Historically it’s april 12 - 17. I’ll let you know. It’s really just a small group of guys that do it every year.  It’s a long night because you don’t shock the river until after dark. Then you have to milk the eggs and place them in the hatchery. But it’s well worthwhile. It helps a lot.

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