Sk8man

ANOTHER good reason to wear your life jacket

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11 hours ago, jimski2 said:

You can throw or cut loose your anchor line and motor away. prepare your crew to take action.

 

So, what you're saying is, the people in the fishing boat DID HAVE enough time to start the motor and get out of the way?

 

Didyou watch the video and count the precious few seconds they had to react? Or are you just trying to stir the pot?

 

Which direction is the bigger boat going to turn. Is he going to change course, or not, before he runs you over and kills someone? Is he driving distracted? Is he in the middle of a medical condition like a seizure? Does he have a mechanical emergency that made him lose control of the boat? Is he intentionally trying to run you over because he's gone bonkers? What's his next move as you try to start your motor and evade his speeding boat?

Edited by Todd in NY

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I don’t know what for shoestring anker rope your using but it takes a good while to saw off my anger rope. 3/4” nylon, if you tight with anker, you can only move so far right or left, the nutjob behind the wheel should have been more respectful of others around him including the welfare of his grandson or whoever’s with him this would have never happened!!! I know in some states they make senior citizens retake their drivers test, maybe this should be the same for boaters also?? My grandfather drove up till 90 years old. He had enough sense to say he doesn’t trust himself anymore, as the traffic is way to heavy anymore for him to feel safe.

Edited by pap

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In regards to the "engaged in fishing" side of the comment above, that is an attempt to refer to the boat that was hit as "engaged in fishing" by which it does not fit the definition.  Engaged in fishing refers only to those who would be restricted in their ability to maneuver.  A boat fishing with standard lines, and even trolling does not fit the definition as such and therefore has no special right of way..  If they were a Purse Seiner hauling nets, then it would qualify as a fishing vessel restricted in ability to maneuver.  The boat that did the hitting was overtaking the boat that was fishing which unless anchored which I do not believe was the case, was in fact charged with the same duty to see and avoid collision.  As in most cases the insurance companies will probably end up with a split of liability with the majority falling on the knucklehead on the yacht.  Who according to the accounts i've read was handicapped, boarded in a wheel chair, unable to see where he was going, and distracted by a cell phone, and fairly elderly.  Very lucky he didn't kill anyone, however in the statements he has given he seems not even remorseful and blaming the other boat....damn lucky no one was killed,..and certainly a statement for small boaters wearing some manner of life preserver at all times...

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Since I qualified for Social Security, I wear a vest anytime I'm in a boat. 

 

There are laws that govern boating in New York State:  Here is an excerpt:

Navigation

 
    § 45. Reckless  operation  of  a vessel; speed. 1. (a) Every master or
  operator of a vessel shall at all times navigate the same in  a  careful
  and  prudent  manner in such a way as not to unreasonably interfere with
  the free and proper use of the navigable waters of  the  state  and  all
  tidewaters  bordering  on  or  lying within the boundaries of Nassau and
  Suffolk counties or unreasonably endanger any vessel or person. Reckless
  operation is prohibited. Any person operating a vessel in  violation  of
  this  subdivision  shall  be  guilty  of a misdemeanor punishable as set
  forth in section seventy-three-b of this article.
    (b) No person shall operate a  vessel  at  a  speed  greater  than  is
  reasonable  and  prudent  under  the conditions and having regard to the
  actual and potential hazards then existing.
    1-a. No vessel other than the tending vessel shall be operated  within
  one  hundred  feet  of  a red flag with a diagonal white bar which, when
  displayed on the water or from a boat, indicates underwater diving, or a
  designated course for racing shells but no such flag shall be placed  so
  as  to  deny access or use of any boathouse, wharf, harbor, bay, channel
  or navigable waterway.
    2. Except as provided in section forty-five-cc of this part, no vessel
  shall be operated within one hundred feet of the shore,  a  dock,  pier,
  raft,  float  or  an anchored or moored vessel at a speed exceeding five
  miles per hour, unless such vessel is being operated  near  such  shore,
  dock,  float, pier, raft, or anchored vessel for the purpose of enabling
  a person engaged in water skiing to take off or land.
    3. The provisions of this section shall not apply to  a  vessel  while
  actually  competing  in  a regatta or boat race authorized under section
  thirty-four of this chapter.
    4. The  provisions  of  subdivision  two  above  shall  not  apply  to
  commercial  vessels  having a valid marine document issued by the United
  States or a foreign government.
    5. The violation of any of the provisions of this section  other  than
  paragraph  (a)  of  subdivision  one  of this section shall constitute a
  violation punishable as set forth in  section  seventy-three-c  of  this
  article.

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Here's some more, where the right of way of sailboats is indicated.

 

§ 41. Pilot rules. The following rules shall be observed on all mechanically propelled vessels on the navigable waters of the state and all tidewaters bordering on or lying within the boundaries of Nassau and Suffolk counties: 1. Signals. The signals for passing, by the blowing of the whistle, shall at all times be given by the master as defined in this act. (a) One distinct blast of the whistle shall mean: "I direct my course to starboard"; except when two vessels are approaching each other at right angles or obliquely, when it shall signify the intention of the vessel which is to starboard of the other to hold course and speed. (b) Two distinct blasts of the whistle shall mean: "I direct my course to port." (c) Three distinct blasts of the whistle shall mean: "My engines are going at full speed astern." (d) Four distinct blasts of the whistle shall mean: "I am in distress and need your assistance." (e) Five or more distinct blasts of the whistle shall constitute the "danger signal." (f) It shall be forbidden to use what has become technically known among pilots as "cross-signals"; that is answering one whistle with two, or two whistles with one. (g) When a vessel is under way in a fog, mist, falling snow, or heavy rain storm, it shall be the duty of the master to cause a long blast of the whistle to be sounded at intervals not exceeding one minute. When towing other vessels the long blast of the whistle shall be followed by two short blasts. Such vessel shall proceed at a moderate speed and with caution, having careful regard to the existing circumstances and conditions. (h) The master of a vessel, when at anchor during a fog, mist, falling snow or heavy rain storm, shall, at intervals of not more than one minute, ring a bell rapidly or sound other warning signals for about five seconds. 2. Positions. (a) When vessels are approaching each other "head and head," that is, end on or nearly so, it shall be the duty of each to pass on the port side of the other, and either vessel shall give, as a signal of her intention, one distinct blast on her whistle, which the other vessel shall answer promptly with one similar blast of her whistle. (b) When vessels are approaching each other and the courses of such vessels are so far to the starboard of each other as not to be considered to be meeting head on or nearly so, either vessel shall immediately give two distinct blasts of her whistle, which the other shall answer promptly with two similar blasts of her whistle, and they shall pass on the starboard side of each other. (c) When vessels are approaching each other at "right angles or obliquely" so as to involve risk of collision, the vessel which has the other on her own port side shall hold her course and speed, and shall so signify with one distinct blast of her whistle; and the vessel which has the other on her own starboard side shall keep out of the way of the other by directing her course to starboard so as to cross the stern of the other vessel, or, if necessary to do so, shall slacken her speed, or stop or reverse. (d) When vessels are running in the same direction and the vessel which is astern shall desire to pass on the starboard side of the vessel ahead, she shall give one distinct blast of her whistle as the signal of such desire, and if the vessel ahead answers with one similar blast of her whistle, she shall pass to the starboard; or if the vessel astern shall desire to pass on the port side of the vessel ahead, she shall give two distinct blasts of her whistle as a signal of such desire, and,
  if  the vessel ahead answers with two similar blasts of the whistle, she
  shall pass to the port; but if the vessel ahead does not think  it  safe
  for  the  vessel  astern  to  pass  at that point, she shall immediately
  signify the same by giving five or more rapid blasts of her whistle (the
  danger signal), and under  no  circumstances  shall  the  vessel  astern
  attempt  to pass the vessel ahead until such time as they have reached a
  point where it can be safely done, when said vessel ahead shall  signify
  her willingness by blowing the proper signal, which shall be answered by
  the vessel astern. Neither vessel shall in any case attempt to cross the
  bow or to crowd upon the course of the other vessel.
    (e) If when vessels are approaching each other head and head, that is,
  end  on  or nearly so, (as per subdivision (a) and (b)) or crossing each
  other's courses, (as per subdivision (c)), or desire to pass each  other
  (as  per  subdivision (d)), either vessel fails to understand the course
  or intention of the other, from any cause, the vessel so in doubt  shall
  immediately  signify the same by giving five or more rapid blasts of her
  whistle, (the danger signal), and both vessels  shall  immediately  slow
  their  speed,  or stop or reverse, as required to avoid collision, until
  proper signals have been given, answered and understood,  or  until  the
  vessels have passed each other.
    (f)  When  a mechanically propelled vessel shall meet a sailing vessel
  proceeding in such direction  as  to  involve  risk  of  collision,  the
  sailing vessel shall have the right of way. It shall be incumbent on the
  master  of  the sailing vessel to keep a vigilant lookout and change her
  course, if necessary, to avoid any danger.
 

Edited by Lucky13

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During the summer months you have to keep an eye out for Canadian yacht owners that are making the run from Wilson to Toronto.  I have had a few close calls with these elderly gentlemen setting the autopilot and then going down below.   

Totally illegal. A watch must be maintained at all times.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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And....never rule out alcohol as a potential factor. Honeoye for example in the Spring and summer has a lot of drunken operators at night oftenwith no lights...personally observed repeatedly while fishing from shore (luckily)

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Unfortunately all the laws, and navigation rules, are no match for stupidity, carelessness, and drunkenness.......

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