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tim

Bunk versus roller guide one

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Anybody have a preference which one is better I have an islander and when it’s blowing it’s all over the place and gets hard to load .looking for an easier way to get it on the trailer. I’ve tried backing the trailer in the water less so the bunks are more out of the water doesn’t make a difference. Thanks for any ideas

 

 

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The PVC posts that you install at the rear of the trailer help a lot and easy installation some come with lights as well. There are a variety to choose from, I just make sure that the front of my bunks are protruding at a certain point (have to determine for your setup) so the boat doesn't float over the bunks and the guide ons center it fine. Just have to make sure the guide posts are set up out aways from the trailer frame  to allow the boat enough room to center when it first comes to the end of the bunk or rollers. Here is an example of them: https://www.wholesalemarine.com/ce-smith-post-style-boat-trailer-guides.html?gdffi=facc80a89aaa41289ca25f0e582c289c&gdfms=5AB39A9097A14821888666125443002A

Edited by Sk8man

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the posts are a great help. I have the shorter ones but 2 sets, one set at the rear and another just where the boat starts to flair in, maybe 10' apart or so. I power load and since I added the front ones I can load pretty fast with just myself  right to bow guide. 19' aluminum onto a bunk trailer

Edited by scobar

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The best loading trailer I ever had was an Eagle bunk trailer. I think the secret was it had 4 bunks and the inner 2 angled toward center. I t also had 2 short side centering boards at the back of the trailer. It was impossible to not have the boat centered unless you backed in much too far. I see a lot of people try to load with the trailer much too deep and personally I think bunks give better support than rollers.

Edited by horsehunter

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I have rollers and 8 foot long side boards on my trailer The rollers give wider support than the bunks and the rolling action makes it easier to load the boat back on. As for centering, my Islander still gets blown around. So when it is windy I make sure that the trailer is not too deep. The bad part of rollers is that you must keep the boat chained up while backing down the ramp because it may roll off while backing into the water. 

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What SK8man said!! With the high water and winds last year, I had a hell of a time loading my boat 22ft with roller trailer. Put those posts on, and WOW what a difference, as long as you get the nose through the post you can drive right up to the front bumper. The posts are reinforced with a square piece of metal inside and they are very strong. I personally think that was one of the best thing I did to the trailer!!

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Bunks, rollers are a problem putting in and I think there's a bit of a saftey issue when hauling. I have a 19ft. Ebtide with rollers and a 25ft Wellcraft with bunks. I prefer the bunks. I wanted to add that when loading with rollers and by yourself it may require you to keep the motor engaged or the boat will roll back off the trailer.

Edited by David Podlesnik
Add info

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One of the potential problems with rollers on the traailer itself is that some manufacturers have stated that they are not recommended for certain hulls. I know it applied to my Whaler when I bought it. Apparently they can leave small depressions or "dents" in the gel coat when trailering etc. I'm sure there will be folks that consider this BS but I wasn't willing to take the chance and opted for bunks.The rollers on the guide ons shouldn't present any concerns but I know that sometimes when the black rubber starts to age it may leave black marks on the hull. I honestly haven't need them as the PVC is pretty slippery and nothing hangs up on them (unless you leave your bumpers out:lol:) and my boat is pretty wide

Edited by Sk8man

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21 hours ago, Sk8man said:

The PVC posts that you install at the rear of the trailer help a lot and easy installation some come with lights as well. There are a variety to choose from, I just make sure that the front of my bunks are protruding at a certain point (have to determine for your setup) so the boat doesn't float over the bunks and the guide ons center it fine. Just have to make sure the guide posts are set up out aways from the trailer frame  to allow the boat enough room to center when it first comes to the end of the bunk or rollers. Here is an example of them: https://www.wholesalemarine.com/ce-smith-post-style-boat-trailer-guides.html?gdffi=facc80a89aaa41289ca25f0e582c289c&gdfms=5AB39A9097A14821888666125443002A

So Les here's a little addition I incorporated for mine. 

IMG_0669.jpg

IMG_0670.jpg

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I have seen more than one boat roll off onto the concrete launch apron and 2 roll off onto a highway.. I also think rollers are pressure points especially on bad roads. One of my friends has a roller trailer and i don't ever think i have seen his boat level on the trailer and have watched him have to stick his boat back in the water for a second try.

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I got the non marking roller you see at Tractor Supply. I used a center thru bolt and the U bolts  you see. I placed it so that the boat enters it and  then stays centered. The rollers only lightly  touch the hull at rest. The thru bolt is the key to keeping it from turning durning loading or unloading.

Edited by Neo1945

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Nice going Don:yes: Looks like you've added a bunch of stuff since the last pics I saw of the boat too :lol:

Edited by Sk8man

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I got the non marking roller you see at Tractor Supply. I used a center thru bolt and the U bolts  you see. I placed it so that the boat enters it and  then stays centered. The rollers only lightly  touch the hull at rest. The thru bolt is the key to keeping it from turning durning loading or unloading.

Thats a nice idea Never seen that before.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Tim, I have the carpeting bunks on the trailer and I HAD carpet guides on the side. Took off the sides because they had the lite duty U bolt system on them and kept moving until they finally broke. I installed a pair of Cabela's deluxe roller guide ons and would never install any other brand. They are tank solid!!! I haven't had any problem with rubber marks on the either. Keep them close and you are even fight up.

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I'm a perfect world I want to unload with a roller trailer and load with a bunk.

My boat has a bunk trailer and will just about load itself if I don't back up too far. Tuning a trailer is very important for both roller and bunk trailers to load boats straight.


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I have a   191v Islander on a Venture  trailer. I fish alone often and windy days at the dock can be a pain. I bought a set of Smiths 5'  guide bunks and problem solved. I adjusted them so there is only 2" or less clearance on each side. It centers the boat as soon as the bow starts.

 

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Thanks guys I went with the  60" ce smith lighted posts. My home lake has a very steep launch and with the wind the boat will sometimes float over any type of other guide on. Thanks for all the advice, if these don't work I'll go with something else.

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7 hours ago, tim said:

 Thanks guys I went with the  60" ce smith lighted posts. My home lake has a very steep launch and with the wind the boat will sometimes float over any type of other guide on. Thanks for all the advice, if these don't work I'll go with something else.

Good luck. Although I have to say I couldn't possibly get my boat to go over my bunks. Just saying.

 

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I have used rollers now for fifty years. When rough seas and calm lake waters are present I set the trailer up with only the first rollers in the water. I walk out to the boat on my trailer on its planks to hook up my power winch cable and pull from there. The boat always comes on straight if it is balanced on both sides. When launching I stop before the wheel bearings go under water and the boat rolls off easily, the boat is aluminum.

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