Fishwilly

Modifying boards

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I made of set of composite pvc boards like the Amish ones. (copied my buddies exactly)

Only thing I'm wondering is could i had a rigid piece of aluminum on one of the skis at the lead edge to extend the angle of attack?

I'm thinking even adding a lip that is an 1" or 2" longer if they'd pull out more?

 

 

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Did you cut a compound angle on the front of each board? So the front cuts through the water or are your boards blunt cut on the angle. Another words do your boards have a sharp edge? If so thats all you'll need.

Sent from my LG-M327 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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yeah they are a compound mitre. I copied the Amish board 100%. My boat is only 18' but I have a 6' mast so the line must be at least 8' up.

I just find that the boards don't pull off to the side like I'd hope and seem to drag behind the boat.

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Move the tow eye back towards the rear of the board more, even just an inch or two. Also drill some small holes in the bottom of the boards towards the rear and fill them with lead. I used old sinkers. Then epoxy over the lead to seal the holes. This will make the boards sit lower in the water and “bite” more adding them to pull harder and better

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

 

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Just now, bout time said:

Move the tow eye back towards the rear of the board more. Also drill some small holes in the bottom of the boards towards the rear and fill them with lead. I used old sinkers. Then epoxy over the lead to seal the holes. This will make the boards sit lower in the water and “bite” more adding them to pull harder and better


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

Thanks for the advice on the tow eye. I'll try that. Don't need any lead...the composite board is plenty heavy and they sit low enough

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That’s exactly why I didn’t paint or seal my boards. Mine do the same thing for about just say 1/2hr till they soak up some water then you notice they start working better and better!! I also used cedar. I bought a 8’ piece of cedar toung  and grove board, made them so the toung side down as a rudder and cut the groove off they are 6”s in hight. I don’t know if the toung really acts as a rudder but it was a thought:lol: mine pull like hell!!!

Edited by pap

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That’s exactly why I didn’t paint or seal my boards. Mine do the same thing for about just say 1/2hr till they soak up some water then you notice they start working better and better!! I also used cedar. I bought a 8’ piece of cedar toung  and grove board, made them so the toung side down as a rudder and cut the groove off they are 6”s in hight. I don’t know if the toung really acts as a rudder but it was a thought:lol: mine pull like hell!!!


I also used cedar for my boards. I added the weight as mentioned above and mine are like mules. I almost have to stop to retrieve them. I broke two planer reels before I learned this lessons. A charter captain years ago had a set made out of PT and they weighed a ton. I thought he was crazy but now I understand.


'Bout Time
Mike

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1 hour ago, bout time said:

 


I also used cedar for my boards. I added the weight as mentioned above and mine are like mules. I almost have to stop to retrieve them. I broke two planer reels before I learned this lessons. A charter captain years ago had a set made out of PT and they weighed a ton. I thought he was crazy but now I understand.


'Bout Time
Mike

 

 

:yes:  :yes:

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13 hours ago, pap said:

Did you cut a compound angle on the front of each board? So the front cuts through the water or are your boards blunt cut on the angle. Another words do your boards have a sharp edge? If so thats all you'll need.

Sent from my LG-M327 using Lake Ontario United mobile app
 

 

I question the need for what I think you mean by a compound angle . Wouldn't leaving more material on the bottom of the leading edge grab more water and pull harder. Also someone suggested adding weight to the back of the boards. On my Church inlines I move the weights forward to keep the leading edge deeper and pulling. Neither the Church or Offshore inlines or the Cannon collapsible have what I think you refer to as a compound angle.

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i would say the weights added to the back of the outside board is to give balance or stability in rough conditions

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20180228_083138.thumb.jpg.85ca733e58219321c40d44fb1108cf1e.jpg 

Edited by pap

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As you can see these are the plans I used to make mine, you can see the compound miter on the leading edge. I’d get my boards out for you to see but there tucked away in the cuddy. This helps cut through the waves with a lot more ease, I get what your saying about the off shore boards and the other manufacturers out there and this is the reason we modify and make our own.

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Some good tips here too from Bob's original "09 post

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on an inline the pull of the lure/copper/leadcore is directly on the back of the board so you weight it forward to keep it balanced instead of noseing up.  on a big board the pull is on the tow line and thus the inside of the board and forward of center this would tend to pull the nose in towards the boat so you weight the back outside edge to counter balance and get the outside board to dig deeper creating more outward force

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14 minutes ago, ifishy said:

on an inline the pull of the lure/copper/leadcore is directly on the back of the board so you weight it forward to keep it balanced instead of noseing up.  on a big board the pull is on the tow line and thus the inside of the board and forward of center this would tend to pull the nose in towards the boat so you weight the back outside edge to counter balance and get the outside board to dig deeper creating more outward force

This is the answer I was hunting for. Makes total sense.

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Posted (edited)

On the homemade boards is your tow point above or below center. The way I read the plan its below  but in the diagram it looks above

Edited by horsehunter

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The plan states its 3" above the bottom,which translates to about 1/2" above center line,based on the 1 x 6 being  a true 5& 1/2" width board.

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Posted (edited)

The plan I saw was not clear and I read the bill of materials as 1x8

The homemade boards that came with my boat are 7 inches tall and about 2 inches shorter and the pulls are either very low or very high. The leading edge is not compound cut and the angles are metal covered.  I have yet to run them.

I have only used Church inlines or Cannon collapsible which I like. The Cannons belong to a friend and I would like to find a good used pair

Edited by horsehunter

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Eye bolts too high and the board may have a tendency to be pulled over or lift the outside board so it's not dragging in the water like you want it to. To low and the line is always dragging in the water along with your fishing line not getting out to the board.

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I used red wood for the boards, does not rot in water. With toilet base screws inserted in the top for the spreader bars and wing nuts, i can collapse the boards to take up less space in the boat. The base screws have a screw thread on one end for inserting in the board and machine threads on the other end for tightening the spreader bars. 

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On my set the eye bolt is about centerline but it is about 6 inches long and bent up at about the half way point this puts the attachment point up high without putting to much leverage on the board so it can still ride mostly level.  they are cedar and over 30 years old at this point and still work fairly well sit nice and low and dig nicely through waves 

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19 hours ago, Bozeman Bob said:

Eye bolts too high and the board may have a tendency to be pulled over or lift the outside board so it's not dragging in the water like you want it to. To low and the line is always dragging in the water along with your fishing line not getting out to the board.

Wouldn't being high lift the inside board and make the outside dig?

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Wouldn't being high lift the inside board and make the outside dig?


It may but two boards in the water sitting low pull a lot harder than one and they are more stable


‘Bout Time
Mike

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No.its pulling the board that is trying to move away from the boat at the center line. A example , two 4x8 pieces of plywood standing on there sides connected by 2x4 x 8'   So there 8' apart, now pull on one 4x8 near the the top,the other sheet will lift up.Now pull it from the middle and see how much harder it is to lift , if you can even lift it.

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