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Rescue off oak orchard !?


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As a weekend warrior I would like to thank Jason Martin for getting on the radio and telling me that with the change in wind direction it was going to get bad. Pulled rods and headed in and was very thankful that I did! With that being said I would ask those of you with the experience (Chaters capt.) to let guys like me ( weekenders) that your heading because of weather and not because your boxed out .


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1 hour ago, final flight said:

As a weekend warrior I would like to thank Jason Martin for getting on the radio and telling me that with the change in wind direction it was going to get bad. Pulled rods and headed in and was very thankful that I did! With that being said I would ask those of you with the experience (Chaters capt.) to let guys like me ( weekenders) that your heading because of weather and not because your boxed out .


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I have only fished the east end and there are plenty of times when charter captains will issue bad weather approaching broadcasts even telling how much time before it should hit yet they are ignored. I would dare say it's the same on the entire length of the lake. They may not tell you their secrets of how and where they're fishing but they do look out for others safety and if they say it, believe it and quit. 

Edited by Firechief48
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I believe they will try for them all but at the very least the popular ones for the area you're in. East end 68-72 but with scanning radios should be able to pick up any. CG will also broadcast bad weather. Keep eyes to the west, if it starts to look bad a quick check for radar on a smart phone will help also. Lady O can rear her ugly head real fast if she wants too. 

Edited by Firechief48
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The USCG does not broadcast warnings on 68 or 72. Reality should hit them over the head someday. FCC rules and
regulations are out of date and should be amended to the practices of small boats who operate with single channel radio receivers and monitor only one working channel.


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The USCG does not broadcast warnings on 68 or 72. Reality should hit them over the head someday. FCC rules and
regulations are out of date and should be amended to the practices of small boats who operate with single channel radio receivers and monitor only one working channel.


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Radios with one channel are out of date. VHF radios are not expensive. Most modern radios scan several channels and have WX which will emit a warning if severe weather threatens The radio can then be tuned to a weather frequency for info. Warnings are broadcast on channel 16. Which MUST , by law , be monitored for emergency broadcasts


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4 hours ago, chinook35 said:


Radios with one channel are out of date. VHF radios are not expensive. Most modern radios scan several channels and have WX which will emit a warning if severe weather threatens The radio can then be tuned to a weather frequency for info. Warnings are broadcast on channel 16. Which MUST , by law , be monitored for emergency broadcasts


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After this first happened I actually bought a handheld VHF radio to have as a backup to my fixed radio just in case. Tested this radio out yesterday, Uniden MHS75... floating, JIS8 rating, 16/9 button, memory feature, channel scan, weather stations, 12hr battery life, rechargeable battery... I picked up chatter clear as day as well the CG broadcasts. All for $75, how can you justify not having one?

Edited by FishingFool34
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The law could easily amended to allow broadcasts to include 68 and 72. The Coast Guard does not have to monitor them, just amend their broadcast to allow safety transmission on 68 and 72. No cost to boaters then.


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The law could easily amended to allow broadcasts to include 68 and 72. The Coast Guard does not have to monitor them, just amend their broadcast to allow safety transmission on 68 and 72. No cost to boaters then.

 

 

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I say again , if you have a VHF radio on your vessel it , Must , by law and FCC regs , be tuned to monitor channel 16 , the international hailing and emergency frequency . If you want to chatter on 68 or 72 , then change to that frequency to chat , when you’re finished return to 16. If you want to listen for the hot bite get a radio that monitors and scans several frequencies. If you're going to do something , do it right  there could be a boat 100 meters off your starboard side in serious trouble  , and if you are on 68 or 72 listening for the “ hot  bite” you will never hear his distress call on 16  

 

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I want to make sure something is clarified before someone reads this improperly. Marine radios are not required by law. No channels need to be monitored. 

 

Not saying they aren’t needed or shouldn’t be on everyone’s rig, but, to my knowledge, they aren’t law. Not in the US anyways. Please correct me if I’m mistaken.

 

 

Edited by Offshore IV
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When you play stupid games you win stupid prizes! I have a pretty seaworthy vessel,but when waves start approaching 3’ I head for dry land. Death that was totally avoidable. Sorry and Condolences only go so far.


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On ‎8‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 6:42 PM, Paul Czarnecki said:

 

 


And THAT is what ticked me off about this whole situation. Everyone was quick to jump on me for being callous and "heartless" but to me that was a needless death. Accident or not. It was no accident they were there.
I'm out!


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I was fishing out at the Oak during this period of time and as Paul and others have said said it was common knowledge that this fisherman was proud to say they were all about taking chances. It is a simple fact that this kind of arrogance combined with the unpredictable nature of fishing on the Great Lakes breeds serious trouble very predictably.

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I want to make sure something is clarified before someone reads this improperly. Marine radios are not required by law. No channels need to be monitored.   

Not saying they aren’t needed or shouldn’t be on everyone’s rig, but, to my knowledge, they aren’t law. Not in the US anyways. Please correct me if I’m mistaken.

 

 

 

You are absolutely right. A radio on a recreational vessel under 20 meters is not required by law. If a smaller pleasure vessel has a marine radio it falls under “ voluntary “ regulations. Please access USCG regulations under mandatory monitoring I quote “ any vessel either mandatory or voluntary , must monitor channel 16 , when not actually communicating on another frequency. Read the rules You are mistaken

 

 

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So have they said what happened? From what I have read and heard he was out in rough weather in a small (19' or so boat). Were there engine issues, just took a bad wave and got swamped? Just curious to see if I can learn from it. Although if it starts getting bad I will head in, bad being 2-3 ft waves. I tend to err on the caution side.

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