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 finger lakes and lake Ontario are two different fisheries, finger lakes are the mother fishery. everything started here. lake Ontario fishery  high tech fishery. they took finger lakes techniques and made fishing better.  They changed our way how to fish with bait, those gang hooks a big joke compared to what we have today. most of our spoons came from our state, most of those flutter spoons you see in the book develop for our finger lakes. you notice most of them are all thin metal with copper or silver plated to troll at slower speeds. lake Ontario develop there own spoons because those finger lake ones didn't hold up to well with bigger fish. they made heavier metal ones that you can troll up to 5 mph. cant do it with the finger lake ones. night fishing never got started up there. finger lakes very popular. seth green rig started here too. techniques today made the meat rig obsolete. some guys still use it. rods and reels are much better today. better wire line and copper also. copper fishing started here too. our tackle shops sold it very cheap compared to what we have to pay today. again we can thank our capitalism system built around the little guy. we don't have it no more. that Victrola man  made using his brains to make a nice fishing reel. today we have our jiggers that fish with modern fish finders that started here too. jig fishing will get better because you don't have to pay a lot of money to fish.  I can go on and on. it started right here.

Edited by Ray4852

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I won't try to counteract the leaps in logic, but for the folks looking at this who may be unfamiliar with the issues mentioned a correction is in order concerning the origin of many of the techniques and equipment used on Lake O. Much of it stemmed from things being used earlier on Lake Michigan, and the other Great Lakes  and before that some of the things originated in the Pacific Northwest and the salt water environment; not the Finger Lakes. The Seth Green did originate on the Finger Lakes (Keuka) and copper jerking may have as well but not much of either is real practical or useful on Lake O for a variety of reasons some of them spelled K.I.N G S.

Edited by Sk8man

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As for Victorlas, the spring motors were generally obtained from old units left on the curb for the trashman.  Nowadays, people look for the trolling units so they can get a spring motor for restoring a Victrola.  If someone manufactured a spring operated motor now, that would handle 200-300  feet of line, I'd buy a couple, pulling wire is very effective up in the 'daks, where the bottom is generally too rough and variable for downriggers!

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We still fish like that now. Hand lining flasher or whipping wire. We are all ways using our Victrola---that is the only way fish on Seneca. I think that you can still buy the A&S stamping reel, and they hold about 300 feet of stainless line.

Sent from my SM-T670 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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A and S automatic  on left and old style basic victrola on the right

victrolaaands.jpg

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I got looking thru my stuff and Ive got the Sanders fishing guide #2. It covers the fingerlakes , lake o, oneida lake

and all the streams and rivers in central NYS. Covers how to rig everything from seth green rigs to downrigging.My guess would be printed late 70s early 80s. Its 323 pages.lots of black and white pictures including all lake and stream maps.the book is 8'' x12'' . Books always been on the shelf never in the boat.

price on cover was $17.95  back then. Any interest in this book? There may be many more out there I dont know.

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Nice looking Victrola. I bet you got it from the old timer from Penn yan. I had one of those automatic reels. I sold it cheap to an old timer at the launch ramp. If you break the spring on the Victrola. its very hard to fix.  two turns on the handle is all i need to keen tension on the spring  all season.

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Actually I bought it second hand from my buddy Hop about 30 some years ago:lol: It has seen some fish over the years too. You are very right about the spring. Have to be real careful not to turn them too tight and they are hard to find these days if it does haappen. I saw some fancier real nice victrolas at the Watkins show last March that were real tempting Ray.

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Great topic.  I really enjoyed reading these posts.


My first experience with Finger Lakes trout fishing began at Lodi in the early 70's.  An old guy (who was probably actually younger than I am now) would go out every morning from the campground and bring back 2 or 3 lakers and rainbows.  To a 10 year old, the size was massive compared to the stream trout we cut our teeth on.  He was a wire puller, and not the most friendly guy, he but offered suggestion on purchasing a Seth Green Rig in town.  For the next 15 years trolling the Finger Lakes was how we spent the weekends.  We fished from Keuka to Otisco but mainly focused on Skaneateles and Owasco. I spent many days hunkered down in the bow of our 14-foot Starcraft waiting for the rods to bounce.   I returned to focus on warmwater species for the next 20 years but recently got the itch to go after the trout/salmon again after a friend donated a couple of riggers to my son for his boat.


I really enjoy trolling the Finger Lakes.  The setting is so unique and we are blessed to have this in our backyard.  I never really got the itch for the browns or kings on Lake O., but we have been going out of Fair Haven the last two years.  Lake O. is great fishery, but it has a different feel than the Finger Lakes.  Of course each Finger has it own unique feel too, along with the history associated with the fishery.


I have our old Miller's, Pine Valley's, Quick Strikes and Sutton's.  In my opinion, there never a sweeter looking lure than a new Sutton pulled from its wrapper in the 70's.   I am trying to fill out my collection of flutter style Sutton's which is not easy, as some of the early ones were hand cut and very limited in number.  I am almost there (32 out of 35 I think, there may be more).  I purchased an old Seth Green rig this summer and plan to use it at least once while turning off the electronics.  The fish will still be in their old haunts, let old Seth find them.  Sometimes, simpler is better for the mind and soul.

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Very nice post walnut109:yes: I am trying to capture that feeling in my book with copious detail about the old and new methods and equipment etc. integrating the stuff that is used on both the Fingers and Lake O that works in both environments. Your post captures some of the spirit and perspective underlying that effort:smile:

Edited by Sk8man

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It's truly great to read all of these posts and learn about the history of the finger lakes.  I greatly look forward to reading your book, Sk8man. 

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I never fished the finger lakes until I moved to Seneca County 27 years ago, i was always a walleye fisherman on Oneida Lake. Not living far from Berry's Bait and tackle on route 5 and 20 and Roy's Marina . I used to go to Berry's and ask him the how to questions to fish Seneca Lake. That's where I bought my copy of the Holdren handbook (I think it was about $6.50)I read that book from cover to cover I don't know how many times till it was embedded in my brain. I learned how to set up a seth green rod and fish it the old school way. I still got least one rig rod going in my spread. I now fish a Seth green rod with new school gear. like spin Doctors and flies dodgers and flies cowbells and spinning glows and so on .Less I look forward to reading your book too, and I enjoyed meeting up with you trading stories and techniques I'm still using your googly eye flies and your beaded spring clips. Happy holidays to you and your family. Thanks Brian .

 

Sent from my XT1609 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

 

 

 

 

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Les, I can’t wait to read it, we’re going to need a LOU event for the signing. Steve, I can’t even imagine the number of past Seneca gurus who have walked your docks from that book. The number of copies sold back in the day was crazy.


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Just returned from Freeport Maine from the weekend there. Thanks ....still some work to do on it. I made a visit today to my favorite tackle place in Kittery Maine on the way home at the Trading Post which I first visited over 30 years ago, and it makes Cabelas and Bass Pro etc. look like minor operators. Best tackle shop I've ever seen now both for freshwater and saltwater stuff.

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i love Earl's book and I love kittery trading post. --i have been shopping there for 40 years on the way north.

 

we fish Rangeley lake every year the first week of june for landlocks and brookies.---tough but gorgeous lake.

 

can't wait for your book

 

good fishin

 

coach

 

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