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Easiest technique for keeping cimeter sharp?

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I just bought a 12" Victorinox cimeter to replace my larger fish cleaning knife that went "swimming".  Like most folks I like sharp knives but don't like sharpening them.  What suggestions do you have for easily keeping knives sharp, preferably while on the boat?

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I like The Rada Sharpeners they look cheap and they are but they work have them in the boat,camper,house and at work.

They are quick and easy and if it goes for a swim no big deal

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I use the rapala sharpeners. Carry one on the boat and also have one in my hunting bag. Small and affordable and work great

384c75db06855e899ae388f7ce5770d7.jpg


‘Bout Time
Mike

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The ceramic sharpeners are fine for "tune-ups" and it is important to keep knives in some sort of protective covering (sheath?) while not in use. When they become truly dull however you are left with having to take the time to properly sharpen them. It can be done a couple of ways: with an electric sharpener, or in stages sharpening by hand using graduated stones and finishing with ceramic or leather stroping. Any blade when used frequently will require occasional maintenance sharpening no matter the quality or expensiveness of it. Other than a brief tune-up I wouldn't recommend extensive sharpening while on a boat for safety reasons as well as it being difficult maintaining the necessary angle positioning.

Edited by Sk8man

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What you really want to do is go on Amazon and buy an oblong sharpening steel and use it periodically, just a couple swipes everytime you use it, and it will never get dull and stays sharper and doesn't remove nearly as much metal as those mentioned above

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I use  a Worksharp belt sharpener, you can take a butter knife and make a fillet knife, a few passes on each side keeps knives brutally sharp. That said I also keep a good steel on my cleaning table for touch ups while cleaning. Its a bit of an investment but you will never go back to any other method and youll end up doing all your friends knives too

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1 hour ago, FishnChef said:

What you really want to do is go on Amazon and buy an oblong sharpening steel and use it periodically, just a couple swipes everytime you use it, and it will never get dull and stays sharper and doesn't remove nearly as much metal as those mentioned above

I see several available there.  Do you know which you prefer?

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I personally use the kota japanese. Search sharpening steel and it is the first result. Very efficient, a little coarse to start but breaks in quickly. Have one on the boat, one in kitchen at home and one in my work knife kit. Use my knives every day and have never had to use a sharpening stone or one of the above devices. The worksharp system is awesome but pricey and for your stated purpose not necessary

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I love my 12" cimeter knife on big salmon. I'll look into a Kota Japan sharpening steel too.

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X2 on the diamond steel . The secret to a sharp knife is to keep it sharp . A few stokes on it during and after use . 

 

Those rapala things are great but don't last long. 

 

I like my electric knife . It's effortless . 

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I also love my worksharp sharpener. I does a great job on my 12" Dexter russel cimeter and it's.extremely easy to use.puts a razor sharp edge on any knife. The price has come down on the original model in the neighborhood of $69.00 on Amazon.They also have the newer model called the Ken Onion edition (wider belts) for 129.00

Edited by big easy

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Two issues here and perhaps different solutions for each. One is a very dull knife that requires re-doing the edge and the other is a knife that has an edge but needs to be "conditioned" to optimal sharpness. Time spent is also a variable. The Worksharp is a time saver and capable of sharpening from scratch to put a fine edge on a knife but it isn't practical for use "in the field" (e.g. on a boat) for a tune up. The inexpensive ceramic "pocket sharpeners" are OK for "tuning up" a knife out in the field but they don't do a great job of putting a finished enduring edge on a knife. The diamond steels are portable and capable of putting a fine edge on a knife. Although time intensive and more work establishing a basic edge and fine tuning it may be attained using the graduated stones with oil by someone who knows what they are doing can give a lasting edge given a good quality knife to begin with. The angle at which the knife is sharpened is also a big factor because the thinner the blade and edge on it the less durable for some types of use ( e.g. cutting through bones). In short you need the right tool for the job at hand, a good quality knife, and sharpen it according to the intended use. If you have a poor quality steel knife none of the sharpening  of edges or particular tools will give superior results.

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I'll play devils advocate and ask at which angle do you guys sharpen your salmon knives?  Obviously for something doing the skinning (like walleye, perch, etc) it may be something like 17º, but what about the blades you use (like the OP) for cruising through a bunch of slammon?  

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If you had a new knife that was getting a little dull, would you just use the fine belt? How fast do you go through belts. (On Worksharp)


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app


I’ve sharpened my perch fillet knife three times so far this year and the belts look like brand new still. I haven’t used anyone other belt because I was just pretty much “honing it”. I’d have to bet you’d get 15-20 uses out of it depending on how bad the blades are. I sharpened my lawn mower blades with the more aggressive belt, mine which I do 3-4 times a season and the belt is pretty whooped on the fourth time. Hope this helps. I highly recommend the worksharp if you have room and not in a hurry and bouncing around on the lake.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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I just bought a 12" Victorinox cimeter to replace my larger fish cleaning knife that went "swimming".  Like most folks I like sharp knives but don't like sharpening them.  What suggestions do you have for easily keeping knives sharp, preferably while on the boat?
Buy a Cutco and send it in every year. They'll sharpen or replace it for free.

Silverfoxcharters.net

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