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FishingFool34

Boater Safety Course Now Required by Law

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Agreed

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“”Right of way” is a guideline but you must give way to avoid a collision. You take action to avoid an accident even if you have the right of way rule.


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Just finished the course and test honestly, you got to be kidding me. I can see helping new boaters but I could have taken the test without reading the material, except for the PAC section, which I'm never going to do.

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On ‎8‎/‎8‎/‎2019 at 8:26 PM, hawkeye625 said:

I hope it applies to sailboats as well. I had to blast my air horn at one 2 weeks ago. He was on a course to t bone my boat...we were doubled up fighting fish. When I yelled at him to keep off my stern
..we had fish on back there....his only response was...I'm in a sailboat. Apparently he cant control his vessel enough to avoid a boat traveling 2.5 mph.


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Fact is, he had the right of way, even if you were fighting six fish.   A lot of sailors have no clue about fishing, but they definitely know their "rights of way!"

 

I was trolling up on Fourth Lake in the Adirondacks last week, rowing because now that I have a solid 9.9, I can barely lift it to get it on the boat (Frustrating to spend years acquiring the toys only to find out I am too old to play with them anymore!).  A Powered Lund  was running lines for Rainbows (fast) and decided they liked the line 45° to mine and cut me right off, I turned to avoid crossing lines, waited until they were by far enough, and resumed my former line, only to find they had decided to pull a 90 and return right across my path.  I kept on my line that time, and they threw me the bird when they came up, but I had the right of way.  They can definitely use the course, I took it at Camp Rushford in 1965, but I hardly think I'm going to find that certificate.

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Some Boaters, especially the sailboat crowd, get too wrapped up in who has the "right of way". If all boaters would practice more "common courtesy and respect" for each other, it would solve a lot of issues.

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3 hours ago, Todd in NY said:

Some Boaters, especially the sailboat crowd, get too wrapped up in who has the "right of way". If all boaters would practice more "common courtesy and respect" for each other, it would solve a lot of issues.

 

^^^

 

Hop

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Agree with Todd...everyone has the responsibility to avoid a collision no matter the rules of the road. I fish erie out of dunkirk and the catt, and sometimes there are so many boats trolling in a narrow depth range and this where I see the most fault. It amazes me at the number of boaters that don't know that when two boats are oncoming (going towards each other bow to bow) that you should turn starboard and pass port to port. I'll make my adjustment many times to starboard, they make theirs to port...so, I end up adjusting to port to avoid the collision. And some days everyone is good, and its a nice time out.

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While we are on the discussion of right of way etc, I ran into a situation a few weeks ago. I was trolling east to west and encountered another boat trolling north to south. I understand myself to be the giveway vessel in that situation. My maneuver should be to turn to my starboard and go behind the other vessel (as I understand it at least). But the other vessel has boards out and I am, to be safe, assuming 300', 400', or even 500' coppers out. Turning behind him may cause a mess. I ended up trying to speed up and scoot in front of him because I did not have any long lines out at the time. We ended up in a never ending side by side causing both of us to head southwest for what seemed like forever. I should have jumped on the radio but didn't. What does everyone else understand to be the correct action in that case?

 

Thanks

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iA sail boat with no visible sails and is under power becomes a power boat

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, jlogger said:

While we are on the discussion of right of way etc, I ran into a situation a few weeks ago. I was trolling east to west and encountered another boat trolling north to south. I understand myself to be the giveway vessel in that situation. My maneuver should be to turn to my starboard and go behind the other vessel (as I understand it at least). But the other vessel has boards out and I am, to be safe, assuming 300', 400', or even 500' coppers out. Turning behind him may cause a mess. I ended up trying to speed up and scoot in front of him because I did not have any long lines out at the time. We ended up in a never ending side by side causing both of us to head southwest for what seemed like forever. I should have jumped on the radio but didn't. What does everyone else understand to be the correct action in that case?

 

Thanks

 

Radio first, then the horn. If that failed to get his attention I might make a big turn to Port and complete the 360* turn once I think I cleared his lines. He might be a charter boat with no mate. He might have auto pilot, or a customer steering the boat. Or, he might be one of those guys who thinks he owns the lake...

Edited by Todd in NY

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On 8/8/2019 at 8:41 AM, Todd in NY said:

I know some charter captains that need a new Boaters Safety course to remind them that they don't have any more right to be on the lake than the non charter boats.

X2

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While we are on the discussion of right of way etc, I ran into a situation a few weeks ago. I was trolling east to west and encountered another boat trolling north to south. I understand myself to be the giveway vessel in that situation. My maneuver should be to turn to my starboard and go behind the other vessel (as I understand it at least). But the other vessel has boards out and I am, to be safe, assuming 300', 400', or even 500' coppers out. Turning behind him may cause a mess. I ended up trying to speed up and scoot in front of him because I did not have any long lines out at the time. We ended up in a never ending side by side causing both of us to head southwest for what seemed like forever. I should have jumped on the radio but didn't. What does everyone else understand to be the correct action in that case?
 
Thanks
I don't know how close the boats were, so hard to distinguish the right move. But you were the giveway vessel, but instead you cut or tried to cut across him and you in essence forced him on a starboard course to avoid collision or avoid your lines, as he doesn't know what you got dragging behind you either. I would have slowed right down, since I had no long lines out and turned slight starboard and allowed him to continue his course, even if it messes me up. I could have judged that 500 ft when it was past and then gotten back on my course. Bottom line is you were the giveway vessel.

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Thanks for the replies. The situation was such that turning to starboard didn't seem like an option at the time. I probably waited too long to make that move. I definitely acknowledge that I was giveway. The radio was undoubtedly the answer. There wasn't any sort of confrontation involved. I think we both sped up at the same time and then tried slowing at the same time and then ran out of time. With no worries about long lines the situation never happens. In trying to be considerate of his lines, I probably made the wrong choice.

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Thanks for the replies. The situation was such that turning to starboard didn't seem like an option at the time. I probably waited too long to make that move. I definitely acknowledge that I was giveway. The radio was undoubtedly the answer. There wasn't any sort of confrontation involved. I think we both sped up at the same time and then tried slowing at the same time and then ran out of time. With no worries about long lines the situation never happens. In trying to be considerate of his lines, I probably made the wrong choice.

That’s exactly why long lines have no place when the traffic is heavy. Leave them in the boat Or be prepared to lose tackle. It is not possible to allow 600 + ft of clearance when there are other boats in the equation


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Thanks for the replies. The situation was such that turning to starboard didn't seem like an option at the time. I probably waited too long to make that move. I definitely acknowledge that I was giveway. The radio was undoubtedly the answer. There wasn't any sort of confrontation involved. I think we both sped up at the same time and then tried slowing at the same time and then ran out of time. With no worries about long lines the situation never happens. In trying to be considerate of his lines, I probably made the wrong choice.
A man with integrity. You weren't being a dick, you were being considerate of the other vessel. Crap happens, we've all been there.

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:yes:

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The lakes are shared usage and it's not like anyone has the God given right to run a big spread when it's crowded...even charters.  I tell anyone fishing with me past mid morning on the weekends there is no guarantee I can run a full spread and no guarantee we will even get near the water I want to fish.  I fish a small enough lake everyone knows my boat and it's just easier for me and my sanity to stay calm and avoid others best I can even when they should giveway.  Gotta share even with sailboats and jet skis....that being said it would be great if they reciprocated and made any effort to give a touch of courtesy.   Other trollers are often just as bad as anyone.  EVERYONE needs to think of others and try to giveway a bit more and stand on a little less.  If I remember correctly this is supposed to be fun? 

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This topic has got me on a strange train of thought. I have a 17 yr old daughter, and she has some anxiety issues. I was concerned at first, until I realized that everyone her age has anxiety issues, and that she's probably one of the most put-together young women in her peer group. So, why all these kids carrying the world on their shoulders? I think that it's because we've become a society that is dominated by rules, and every time you screw up it is immediately public via social media. They rarely have a chance to relax and, as Justin says, just have fun. Even when they're having fun, they're consumed by how what they're doing fits in with the world. We all worry to some degree about appearances. They worry to the umpteenth degree. 

 

Here, we are a group of fishermen (and women) having a friendly over rules of the road. Years ago, you would have taken a boating course, immediately forgotten it, and life would go on. Instead, we now have a thread that goes on for pages. This isn't a bad thing, but it is the sort of thing that kids do regarding their whole life: they micro-dissect ever part of it, put it out in public for debate, then spend the rest of their time worrying about what they did or didn't do. 

 

Okay, sorry to hijack this thread. It got me thinking, and that's dangerous sometimes. Tight lines.

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That’s exactly why long lines have no place when the traffic is heavy. Leave them in the boat Or be prepared to lose tackle. It is not possible to allow 600 + ft of clearance when there are other boats in the equation


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I wholeheartedly agree. In tight fishing scenarios it is unfair to expect everyone to be able to clear your lines 300 feet or more behind you, at trolling speeds with reduced maneuvering ability and other obstacles (boats) all around. Go find a place that has more clearance.

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Posted (edited)
On ‎8‎/‎16‎/‎2019 at 6:43 AM, Gator said:

This topic has got me on a strange train of thought. I have a 17 yr old daughter, and she has some anxiety issues. I was concerned at first, until I realized that everyone her age has anxiety issues, and that she's probably one of the most put-together young women in her peer group. So, why all these kids carrying the world on their shoulders? I think that it's because we've become a society that is dominated by rules, and every time you screw up it is immediately public via social media. They rarely have a chance to relax and, as Justin says, just have fun. Even when they're having fun, they're consumed by how what they're doing fits in with the world. We all worry to some degree about appearances. They worry to the umpteenth degree. 

 

Here, we are a group of fishermen (and women) having a friendly over rules of the road. Years ago, you would have taken a boating course, immediately forgotten it, and life would go on. Instead, we now have a thread that goes on for pages. This isn't a bad thing, but it is the sort of thing that kids do regarding their whole life: they micro-dissect ever part of it, put it out in public for debate, then spend the rest of their time worrying about what they did or didn't do. 

 

Okay, sorry to hijack this thread. It got me thinking, and that's dangerous sometimes. Tight lines.

Well said. 

 

But isn't this another example of us being dominated by rules?  Next you'll have to have your boater's insurance card along with your safety certificate!

I'm concerned because I took Hunter Safety a couple of years ago (I thought it would be a good idea before going back into the woods with a firearm after about 40 years of not hunting), and it took me "forever" to find a course that hadn't hit capacity almost as soon as it was announced.  I also am not crazy about additional taxes and fees, we are already being taxed to death in the great Emperor's Empire State.  Make it free for the course, and free for the certificate, hold the classes in High School gyms, I'm there with a PFD on!!!! 

Edited by Lucky13

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On 8/16/2019 at 6:43 AM, Gator said:

This topic has got me on a strange train of thought. I have a 17 yr old daughter, and she has some anxiety issues. I was concerned at first, until I realized that everyone her age has anxiety issues, and that she's probably one of the most put-together young women in her peer group. So, why all these kids carrying the world on their shoulders? I think that it's because we've become a society that is dominated by rules, and every time you screw up it is immediately public via social media. They rarely have a chance to relax and, as Justin says, just have fun. Even when they're having fun, they're consumed by how what they're doing fits in with the world. We all worry to some degree about appearances. They worry to the umpteenth degree. 

 

Here, we are a group of fishermen (and women) having a friendly over rules of the road. Years ago, you would have taken a boating course, immediately forgotten it, and life would go on. Instead, we now have a thread that goes on for pages. This isn't a bad thing, but it is the sort of thing that kids do regarding their whole life: they micro-dissect ever part of it, put it out in public for debate, then spend the rest of their time worrying about what they did or didn't do. 

 

Okay, sorry to hijack this thread. It got me thinking, and that's dangerous sometimes. Tight lines.

The anxiety issue is far from haunting only teenagers. We are a society adults and children alike fraught with anxiety over everything and the media, TV programs, video games, news, and Internet and social media have amplified  the problem by a hundred fold. We have government at both the state and federal levels that is both corrupt and incompetent to actually solve even the most rudimentary problems, and that acts in a hysterical manner when incidents do occur by passing gutless laws that fail to actually deal with the origin of the problems and merely attempt to give the appearance of control because they don't really have any valid answers and are unable to compromise with one another. At some level we as a society truly realize this underneath it all and we know that given a major disaster that involves the whole country we will be screwed and left to our own devices. The fear giving rise to the generalized anxiety is REAL: it is not paranoia (imagined or unreasonable fear) and is not just something teens are dealing with if folks are to get their heads out of the sand.

 

As far as the issue of the boating safety training I think most of us know that it is long overdue but as a matter of course we resent the state telling us to do it and it is as much who is telling us to do it (and the control issues involved) as it is the training itself which we know for many folks it is needed because they either don't know what they are doing out there or maybe just don't care about rules of the road or common courtesy.

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