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line weight


nosswa

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So I have been reading a lot of posts on setting up poles for everything from flatline, to dipseys, to copper and leadcore.

I understand the concept of using a heavy braid for backer as it is much thinner than mono or fluorocarbon.

I see recommendations to go from 50 or 65lb braid to 40 or 30# fluorocarbon mainline, and then down to 20-15# mono.

Why are there so many changes in line weights??  Why couldn't I just go from 45-50# braid to 25# fluorocarbon line?

 

 

 

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If you read a post and you do not understand or except the explanations. Just ask specific questions and give the people here a chance to help. The people on this site will go out of there way to answer your sincere questions. 

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I have 4 depthmaser 30's with counters.   All have medium/heavy rods between 8 and 9 feet.  I plan to use 2 for downriggers and 2 for dipseys.   I have 2 planer boards, the big wood ones.  Planed on using the dipseys on them.  So I had already set up 2 with 50# braid, and 25# flourocarbon before finding this website.  So now I'm questioning my setup.  I also have 2 old Penn Mainer reels with copper that I was going to flatline, they do not have counters.  

Edited by nosswa
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There are multiple ways to set up any of the common rigs used to catch salmon and trout. There is no "one and only" best setup. A lot of it is based on experience and results; often of trial and error use. Commonly fluorocarbon is used for leaders and not primarily as a mainline although it could be. On downriggers people usually use monofilament as their main line and fluorocarbon for their leader for spoons and stickbaits as it is thought to be less visible under water and slightly stiffer without much stretch. People used to use lower pound test mono main;lines but now use 30-40 lb commonly because the waterfleas have a harder time adhering to the lines of larger diameter as well as smooth surfaces. Because king salmon inhabit Lake O reel capacity is important as they can peel out hundreds of yards heading from the south shore to Canada:lol:  Often 30-40 lb test mono is used with a 15-25 lb test fluoro leader varying length according to preference and what lure is being run, and for what species targeted. Lighter leaders may be used in early Spring for brown trout for example. I normally use a 20-25 ft leader with a #8 Spro barrel swivel between the mono main line and the leader and a solid ring ball bearing snap swivel (with a rounded end on snap like Duolok snaps).

For dipsy setup commonly 40-65 lb braid is used perhaps early in the season prior to the appearance of waterfleas which makes its use difficult to say the least. Dipsy rigs are usually either 7 or 19 strand stainless steel wire (usually 1,000 ft so again large capacity reel advised) for main line and either a mono or fluoro leader from it OR an attractor such as a flasher or Spin Doctor without leader follows the dipsy with a fly on a very sport 50 lb mono or fluoro, or spoon on a longer leader. If a leader is run it is usually heavier lb test  (25 lb. up). You'll see the braid main lines used more commonly with leadcore or copper set-ups. Hope this answers your question.

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That helps a lot, I think. Lol.  Thank you.  

So 200 to 300 feet of25# flouro on the end of my braid doesn't look like a solid plan....  and I assume the use of steel line is for the added weight.  

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I don’t think you want to try to run divers off your boards. Just set the diver on 3 to get it to pull out to the side of the boat. You want the weight turned in toward the boat to tilt the diver out to the side. Make sure you have that right so the diver doesn’t pull under the boat.

If you’re running braid divers I’d just tie (or clip) directly to the diver and use the the fluoro as your leader off the back of the diver.

This site and YouTube are your best resources for getting setup.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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And steel for divers isn’t for weight. It is used in place of where you’re using braid. Less resistance than braid so divers get a bit deeper and the steel repels the fleas better than braid.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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15 hours ago, Sk8man said:

There are multiple ways to set up any of the common rigs used to catch salmon and trout. There is no "one and only" best setup. A lot of it is based on experience and results; often of trial and error use. Commonly fluorocarbon is used for leaders and not primarily as a mainline although it could be. On downriggers people usually use monofilament as their main line and fluorocarbon for their leader for spoons and stickbaits as it is thought to be less visible under water and slightly stiffer without much stretch. People used to use lower pound test mono main;lines but now use 30-40 lb commonly because the waterfleas have a harder time adhering to the lines of larger diameter as well as smooth surfaces. Because king salmon inhabit Lake O reel capacity is important as they can peel out hundreds of yards heading from the south shore to Canada:lol:  Often 30-40 lb test mono is used with a 15-25 lb test fluoro leader varying length according to preference and what lure is being run, and for what species targeted. Lighter leaders may be used in early Spring for brown trout for example. I normally use a 20-25 ft leader with a #8 Spro barrel swivel between the mono main line and the leader and a solid ring ball bearing snap swivel (with a rounded end on snap like Duolok snaps).

For dipsy setup commonly 40-65 lb braid is used perhaps early in the season prior to the appearance of waterfleas which makes its use difficult to say the least. Dipsy rigs are usually either 7 or 19 strand stainless steel wire (usually 1,000 ft so again large capacity reel advised) for main line and either a mono or fluoro leader from it OR an attractor such as a flasher or Spin Doctor without leader follows the dipsy with a fly on a very sport 50 lb mono or fluoro, or spoon on a longer leader. If a leader is run it is usually heavier lb test  (25 lb. up). You'll see the braid main lines used more commonly with leadcore or copper set-ups. Hope this answers your question.

Correct me if I am wrong.  the heavy 50# mono/flouro follows the steel wire because the wire has no stretch, correct? 

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The 50 lb mono (or some use 40 -50 lb fluoro referred to above is the fly that is run behind the dipsy. The leader between the attractor (e.g. spin doctor or flasher) is usually 40 -50 lb mono or fluoro. Fuoro has much less stretch than mono but sometimes folks run stretchable snubbers to provide some stretch. I don't use them anymore and use Big Game mono instead. Yes the mono does provide some degree of stretch  and in my view is helpful especially with larger heavier fish like kings.

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I'd say 30# is sort of the average, the go to, for any type line (mono, steel, wire, copper, braid) ... people have their reasons to go higher and lower.  Examples, use lower between the paddle and bait (or higher, 40lb before and up to the paddle), so if you hook bottom, you don't lose everything, just the bait with the lighter line.  Lighter on lures so the line is more flexible, giving action ... some go to 20lb or even 12 lb ... Copper or steel they go heavier (45lb) because some want a better sink rate).

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I didn't include the paddle to lure leader in the post above and Tyee Tanic is right and it is exactly what I do. Often for the Finger Lakes I use 30 lb ahead of the paddle and and lighter fluoro toward the lure.down to 10-12 lb test (no kings there:lol:). The exception is a fly which I tie with 50 lb mono regardless of location.

Edited by Sk8man
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Why the 50# mono for fly's?  Just courious. 

Most of my fingerlakes fishing has been pulling copper.  I have played with the downriggers a little but have not used flashers, fly's, etc. Just spoons and the occasional sluggo.   And yes I have caught a few Lakers on sluggio and rubber shads.   My buddies harrase me, you caught fish with that???? , but I was catching fish when they weren't so......im good with it. Lol. 

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My reason for the 50 lb mono relates to the fact that large kings often strike viciously so a little stretch helps out as does the relatively hard coating on the Big Game mono to avoid excessive abrasion of the line. Many times when a king gets hooked on a fly the fly slides upward on its leader exposing the line to its sharp teeth much like the case of a Tuna when "gut hooked" can sever the line or severely weaken it. The fish in the Fingers don't seem to mind the heavier mono as it is generally run deeper and the so-called "invisibility" factor of fluoro is negligible. The stiffer heavy fluoro does perhaps impart a little different and maybe better action to the fly but my flies are purposely heavier than usual to slow them down purposely to let the fish get hold of it better. In the end = personal preference like much of the other stuff:smile:

Edited by Sk8man
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23 minutes ago, Bosun Cowboy said:


30lb


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

X 2 mainly because of the fleas

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