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So riddle me this... you charter a boat for you and three buddies to go out and fish.... what are your expectations and what is defined as a “good day”...

 

Let’s say it’s a 4 or 6 hour trip ....truly interested in different perspectives... I have my definition what’s yours ?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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Posted (edited)

As someone who lives no where near the Finger Lakes or Lake Ontario and most likely would have to charter if I went, I would expect the following:

 

A honest hard working charter.  If one technique isn't working, then a switch to another.

If X aren't biting well then maybe trying to salvage the trip to Y.  Salmon to Lake trout as an example.

Good companionship.

 

Numbers don't mean much to me as no one can control the bite and bad/slow days happen.  That said, I would expect an honest shot.

 

 

Edited by JDK
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First, you expect the guide to be well aware of fish locations. Said guide should work for his/her fee. Fishing is fishing. Some days we catch them, some days we don't. I experienced both on the ocean and lakes. Was it a good time? Good food, laughs? Did a few fish hit the deck? 

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It's a good day if I'm out with friends and not at work.  Anything past that is just icing on the cake.

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The Captain is friendly and does his best to put you on to some fish.  Maybe you catch some, maybe you don't.  For those plagued by the demon of external validation the number of fish caught will make or break the day.  I'm with camper4lyfe - a few good laughs with friends and time away from work and a few good fish?- bonus

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I’m just curious I feel bad if I’m not sending a customer home with 5 plus fish... on Cayuga sometimes it can be hard other days not but I have a habit of giving people more time than they paid for if I don’t feel they have enough... this is not a full time business for me. More for fun and to pay off the toy...I’ve had days this year where weeds and fleas kicked my ass and the line clearing was exhausting but we fought through tried different spots still scored ... but I wonder how much they expect... no one ever complains .. just trying to adjust my expectations to what theirs are....


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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IF I were the skipper, MY expectation would be the same as yours.  Lots of fish and hard work every day.  Hopefully few to no complaints but realizing that can't always happen

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If was to go on a finger Lake charter I would like to help set riggers ,dispys, planners up and pick up at the end . Help net the fish even fillet a fish or two . That is fishing to me . Sitting on a cooler waiting for mate to hand me a rod with a laker on that feels like a boot is boring.

 

Sent from my SM-A102U using Lake Ontario United mobile app

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

As you can already see from just these responses Mark specific expectations vary considerably from person to person.  One of the prime factors is the level of experience of the customer and perceptive captains can usually sort this out rather quickly:smile:.. Servicing the public in any manner requires some "people skills" and patience. The charter trip is a two way street regarding respect: the customer has the responsibility of maintaining decorum such as not drinking too much beforehand and puking all over the nice clean boat, dropping a rod in the water, or allowing kids to run all over the boat grabbing equipment etc. The captain has multiple responsibilities to balance, tries to insure the customers have a good time but also being patient with inexperienced folks and kids and offering tactful guidance, answering  questions that might just seem obvious, tactfully delaying answering while busy rigging or navigating, and not assuming that customers must already know how to handle the equipment no matter how obvious it may seem.

 

Many Americans seem to think that more is always better and this can occur with fishing too, but I think most folks want to mainly enjoy the experience and the anticipation of the strike and bringing in  a fish despite the captains concerns about productivity. I have been on multiple charters on both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and whether I came home with a bunch of fish was always secondary to whether I had fun, whether the captain or crew was congenial  and whether I learned something from the experience or not.

 

Sometimes the customer has to break the ice with the captain but often it should be the other way and the customer made to feel comfortable regardless of experience.

Back in the eighties I had such a charter on Cape Cod. The captain was a shaggy bearded salty guy with a real no nonsense approach and he and the mate did everything while fishing for stripers and blues with light lines and equipment. He acted as though we were kids or something until I chatted a bit with him and discovered he was a Vietnam Vet. Once I indicated that I too was a vet during that same period he perked up a bit, and then when I started mentioning some previous fishing experiences, and that I salmon fished on Lake O etc. he warmed up even more. After a short time, I was manning some rods and making adjustments etc. fully accepted, I went on repeated charters with him, and we are still friends to this day.

The moral of the story is: personal relationships are a two way street no matter what the nature of them. Trying to get to know someone a bit better through conversation whether captain or customer has its benefits to each party. An impatient captain reluctant to converse or answer questions (no matter how simple they may sound) or shift gears in assumptions, may not have a repeat customer. A disrespectful and annoying customer may not feel as though he/she had a good time either.

In short, the personal experience aspect may play a larger role than the specific numbers of fish caught.:lol: ( I guess I should add it isn't true for everyone however)

Edited by Sk8man
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I have gone on  a lot of charters from Florida to Mexico to Hawaii, what I want is honesty if its it wrong time of season and the fish are not there then tell me not take me on a $500 boat ride. I expect to catch some fish, that is what iam booking you for. If I run a charter and the week before we are crushing them, then the lake flipped and the fishing gets tough Ill call my guys and let them know they can then decide if they want to rebook later or cancel or fish. as far as touching gear that depends on the client, not everyone knows how to set a rigger or run out a copper line but if they want to learn great. if they show me they have the experience then have at it, no one want to sit on the hand all day, i always try to get the guys involved some way.

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Last few years have been a learning experience...generally a good one...only two or three negative trips so far out of well a lot... one drunk never allowed back, one psychotic child, also not allowed back that was spin your head around disturbing...they still had a good time...i didn’t..but generally a-lot of people of varying experience levels, like fisherdude says had knowledge came to learn and play with the equipment, which as long as you demonstrate knowledge you can use anything except the rigger with the probe on it...mostly took a-lot of knowledge from the guys here to start..and then read a ton and worked my butt off to get good at the lake...I have to say I dont know what happened prior to 4 seasons back but the fishery on Cayuga is outstanding.


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