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Holy Sh*t!!!


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Another pic.
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The DEC was effective in cutting back on stocking Chinooks along with natural reproduction numbers. The secret is in the forage base availability.


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The DEC was effective in cutting back on stocking Chinooks along with natural reproduction numbers. The secret is in the forage base availability.


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Probably the fish was a six year old chinook that could have been determined.


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Probably the fish was a six year old chinook that could have been determined.


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A 120 pound chinook was taken from a fish trap near Tree Point, Ak at the turn of the last century.


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On 6/24/2021 at 6:28 AM, jimski2 said:


A 120 pound chinook was taken from a fish trap near Tree Point, Ak at the turn of the last century.


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My brother took a sixty pound Chinook from thr Yehtna River a few years ago.

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It is in pounds not metric measurements


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A kilogram is 2.2 lbs So if it was 42 kilos it would be a real monster


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Since there was only one small salmon derby on the Lake last year due to shutdowns etc.  Maybe enough 3 or 4 year old fish were able to live another year rather than being taken out of the lake for a derby???  Who knows.

 

There was a 38.6 lb fish caught the day before the derby (not eligible) plus others in the high 30's all in June!!!!  The lake record of 45 lbs is not too far off those fish!

 

 

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Most dead salmon feed the new hatch as the mountain streams are low in nutrients. On the Kenai/Russian River streams, wasted carcasses are required to be placed back in the streams as feed for the next hatch of eggs.

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