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Can anyone help me a have been having tire trailer issues seems like tires have been wearing odd & separating the chords on my radial tires they are pretty brand new anyone having these same issues the boat is a Starcraft Islander 26 help

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I guess the first things to pop in mind to consider are these:

Possible bent axle on trailer

Bad wheel bearings on trailer

Tire type  (load range) not correct for weight being used

Tire inflation problem

trailer traveling road roads with steep shoulders

Poor quality tires

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I messed up a pair of tires running them at 32psi.  Trailer tires are to be inflated to the maximum pressure indicated on the side of the tire. (normally marked somewhere between 50 and 65 psi)

Edited by 58Johnson
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2 hours ago, Sk8man said:

I guess the first things to pop in mind to consider are these:

Possible bent axle on trailer

Bad wheel bearings on trailer

Tire type  (load range) not correct for weight being used

Tire inflation problem

trailer traveling road roads with steep shoulders

Poor quality tires

 

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Measure from center of ball to center of axle on each side.  Are tires separating on one axle or one side?  If it is on back axle on a tandem trailer, my guess would be overload.  Might want to get trailer weighed with your normal load.  Trolling boats get back heavy with riggers, weights, kickers and gear.

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23 hours ago, mr 580 said:

Measure from center of ball to center of axle on each side.  Are tires separating on one axle or one side?  If it is on back axle on a tandem trailer, my guess would be overload.  Might want to get trailer weighed with your normal load.  Trolling boats get back heavy with riggers, weights, kickers and gear.

The tires are separating on on one axle, the axle closest to the vehicle. What do you mean by center of ball to center of axle on each side

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You measure from where your ball attaches to the the axle center on each side- that dimension should be equal.  If you have a difference either your axle mount has shifted or the front axle is bent.  It is a practice referred as string lining a trailer.  You are determining if that front axle is square to the pull point of the trailer.  Between making sure your axles are square and weighing your trailer, you will find your problem.  If the problem is same tire/same axle-points to an axle problem.  Could axle mounts slid back on one side or that axle is bent.

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sounds like 1 of 2 things. the 1st is an overloaded trailer. the 2nd is the trailer is being towed with the front of the trailer to low putting undue weight and stress on the front axle and tires. get a tape measure go to a level spot and measure the tongue to the ground then measure the back of the trailer to the ground. if the front is lower than the back you need to get another bar for your hitch with enough lift to level the trailer. sometimes just turning the bar over will give you the lift you need. or just use a level on the trailer.

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3 hours ago, mr 580 said:

You measure from where your ball attaches to the the axle center on each side- that dimension should be equal.  If you have a difference either your axle mount has shifted or the front axle is bent.  It is a practice referred as string lining a trailer.  You are determining if that front axle is square to the pull point of the trailer.  Between making sure your axles are square and weighing your trailer, you will find your problem.  If the problem is same tire/same axle-points to an axle problem.  Could axle mounts slid back on one side or that axle is bent.

 

Exactly correct - axle out of alignment or bent axle. If it were a bad bearing, the hub would come apart before the tire did.

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Much easier to measure from the back end of the trailer (each side) to the spring hanger. That's the way the hanger was set when the trailer was built. Measurement should obviously be the same. Still...it sounds like it is over loaded. 

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My experience with dealing with trailer “problems” in the equipment business is that over 80% of the time tires or overload is the issue.  Tire inflation and proper load rating check first.  Second check weight of load and proper load placement-tongue weight and axle loads.  Get trailer on scales to do this- can be an eye opener.  I’d do this before measuring.

In the case of a trailer/load that someone has had for years with no problems with tires that suddenly starts having an issue, I’d look at tires first. Trailer tires aren’t the highest quality.  Then I would look at adjustment points on frame for any sign of movement.  Then check shackles, eye bolts, springs for wear, hub, wheel bearing and any wear point.  Look for any sign of damage/road hazard or curb impact. Get the trailer up on stands with wheels off-helps spot areas needing attention.  Axles can get bent and need replacement.

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i still think that trailer being nose heavy could be the problem. weigh the load then with the trailer level the tongue weight should be 7% to 10% of the load. if it's more than 10% the boat needs moved back on the trailer. this is a good time to check total weight of the load against the trailer rating. make sure the trailer is level when hooked to your tow vehicle.

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