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Gps arrows….


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  Guys I have another question for you from my damaged brain, sorry if it comes out wrong, some of you know my father was    a DEC Archery instructor before he died in 1995.. He had a couple rules he put on top of the state, one was ethical shots, he spent hours making sure hunters only took ethical shots, another rule he had was blood trails, every hunter I’ve talked to they say the same thing how much he instilled in the hunters on how to track deer. So why is it in today’s technology you cannot come up with a GPS in the arrow or the lighted nock…. Woody

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I think that they're still too big to put in an arrow, but interesting idea. Eventually it may be feasible. But in my experience, the arrow either passes through or is lost from most of the deer that I've had to track over any significant distance.

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I agree most arrows do not stay with the deer, however in 2017 I tracked a deer with my dog close to 1.5 miles that the hunter one lunged it straight down under his stand with the arrow still in it. 

With over 75 recoveries, archery only, if it was over 200 yards no arrow in the deer.

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Having done deer processing for over 20 years we always found the broadhead and a small chunk of arrow, I just figured with today’s technology could help hunters recover deer better, something like Coon hunters and there dogs….

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Yeah, that makes sense. I've had the broadhead break off inside before. If you positioned in next to the broadhead, or even made a broadhead that had something itself...it might even give you better punch, being slightly heavier. Sounds like an opportunity for a young inventor/investor. 

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Yes, shot many a deer with them years ago. I actually remember my last time using it, a doe went haywire in a thicket after I shot her. Absolute comical how much string was in and out of the thicket that we had a laugh trying to get through it. I stopped using it when a deer a shot ran and string pulled arrow out which I didn’t really like a whole lot. Plus arrow drop at 30yds back then was about 3-5 inches. 

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This concept I'm my opinion would be great if your arrow stayed in the animal. However in my opinion if your arrows are not passing threw the animals I believe you should really re evaluate the arrows and broad heads that you are using. I'm a firm believer in the Ashby tests and have been shooting heavy Foc arrows for years with solid fixed blade broad heads. The whole supper speed arrow craze in my opinion really did absolutely nothing for bow hunting. Shoot heavy bone splitting arrows shoot to kill not for a blood trail.

Sent from my KYOCERA-E6920 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Zach my fathers opinion was exactly that, he wanted to have a quartering away shot and his fixed broadhead to stay in the deer cavity and do more damage in the heart and lungs…. Woody

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Good to hear from you Dale. I didn't mean to hijack your thread in any way. I just am a firm believer in full pass threw shots no matter what. I think that alot of people worry to much about speed now instead of shooting arrows that are tough enough to do the job that we expect them to. Everything changes with heavy arrows. The deer even react completely different when hit with a heavy arrow. Bows are more silent there are so many benefits that are over looked just to gain 20 or 30 ft per second. I also don't like that alot of people were taught by others to aim back to stay away from the front shoulder because arrows were not designed to make contact with bone and that has lead to alot of 1 lung and maybe liver at best shots. Shooting a heavy arow set up with a tough solid broadhead gives you the ability to tuck right in to the shoulder with the confidence that if something goes wrong you have the ability to split shoulder bones and still enter the most leathal part of the chest cavity closest to the heart. It's all knowing your limitations not Shooting out side of them and having a arrow that is designed to do the dirty work when something un expected happens. I'd be interested in the GPS on my arrow.

Sent from my SM-T727A using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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As Troy "Ranch Fairy" Fowler states, shoot for where you want the arrow to exit as long as it passes through the vital "V"

 

This past 2 years I have shot exactly 2 arrows at deer and have aimed to where I want that arrow to exit where it would take off the top the the heart. My farthest track was 30 yards. Both shots broke ribs and 1 even broke the scapula where the ridge is located headed down to the leg on the opposite side (exit side). Yardage #1 11 yards, #2 15 yards. 

 

Bow poundage 53lbs Prime Logic with an 80% let off Arrow is a Hunter XT from Gold tip weighing in at a rough 570 grn with a fixed blade G5 Stryker in 125gn. 100gn brass insert and fairly short arrows

 

I will always try to shoot the heaviest arrow after getting back into this pastime, and will never resort to lighter faster arrows... Out to 30 yards I feel 100% confident with every shot that I take. If I need to shoot past 45. I will do my damndest to make sure that everything is in my favor before I let that arrow fly and I still am quite confident that my setup will result in the same ending.

 

Know your limits, stick to them, and be sure to draw in your target as close as you can so you don't have to worry. Hunting winds are HUGE, and movement or lack of is just as important.

Edited by Nittanyfisher
punctuation
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