Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Great Northern

Members
  • Content Count

    6
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Great Northern

  • Birthday 08/14/1969

Contact Methods

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Coneseus, Ontario, Chautauqua
  • Interests
    Northern Pike, Tiger Muskellunge, Muskellunge, lure design
  • Boat Name
    "S.S. Falona" - long story
  1. This is a great question, Chad! If I had to choose just ONE, I think the primary consideration would have to be the lure’s versatility and useful application across a wide spectrum of fishing scenarios. With that said, I’d probably have to go with a Bucktail. Original Wolly Bully - All Black feather/skirt, Single #9 (Metallic green/blue blade), by Mike Sperry (Chautauqua Reel Outdoors). Great Pike lure as well...
  2. Congrats Zac! You're building a Musky Dynasty. Good luck!
  3. Very cool Mike! I heard a UofR fish biologist give a talk last week about a Sturgeon revitalization program started in the early 2000s. They put 7,500 10" fish in the lower Genesee, and so far, the populations look healthy. The issue in terms of endangerment is that the fish don't reach sexual maturity until 10-15 yrs old. The fish they netted last week were about 10 yrs old and 3-4 ft long. Cool stuff! BTW....Sturgeon are illegal to target, but it's difficult to enforce because of the similar angling techniques used to catch cat fish. However, you are required to release any caught fish and are also encouraged to report to DEC with any tag info, tattoos, markings, etc. thx for the post! And yes Chad. We need a sturgeon forum!!
  4. Great Post Chad! I couldn't agree more with your recommended technique for spring time DEAD Stickin'. They need it real slow in spring where the water temps are lower. I think of the figure-8 as more a summertime technique when the fish are more aggressive and mobile. The figure 8 is a very swift action, which doesn't really pair well with when you are moving the bait slower with little taps and pauses. At the boat, all you need is that one last little quick movement to make instinct kick in, as it thinks the bait is attempting to escape as it's pinned against the boat...IMHO I was in my boat about 100 yds. from you guys last night and can attest to effectiveness of the technique. I was running jerk/glide baits in a very similar fashion. I was using slow taps and pauses and dead stops a few yds from the boat. That last tap is when they would strike. I caught a few beauties utilizing this technique. As a reminder though to all, boat-side strikes should be free spooled immediately following hook set, as the fish is so close to the boat and she has all her energy for the fight. Otherwise the fish will thrash violently and many times get tangled in the leader/line. And many times this can break the line and potentially damages the fish. And lastly and more importantly, we can't have these beautiful fish swimming around with large lures embedded in their jaws for who knows how long. I learned that one the hard way on Conesus last year with a decent sized Tiger lost after a boat-side strike and broken line. Made me sick! Keep up the good work Chad! Season is heating up....see you on the water p.s. Loved the pic of Katie 7 mos. pregnant holding a beauty! I'm hoping that will be hung in baby Lapa's Nursery next to the crib! Cheers, Tim
  5. Good luck guys! Can't wait for pics tomorrow. Boat a Monster for all your fans in Buffalo and Ra Cha Cha! Timmy
  6. Hey Dennis, the swivel and snap serve a couple purposes and in my experience should always be used. First, the swivel: the main purpose of the swivel is to allow the leader and lure to rotate freely. This will prevent the main line, leader and lure from twisting up and running foul. I prefer a good heavy duty ball bearing swivel. The snap is really for ease of use when changing out lures. If you tie directly to the lure, you will have to re-tie every time you do a lure switch out. Regarding Titanium, I haven’t really heard good things about using it. I prefer Fluorocarbon, usually 80-100lb when fishing for ESOX species. Fluorocarbon has a neutral buoyancy, light passes through it, and is extremely strong. Regarding fishing knots, I like using the Palomar, Clinch knot, or improved Clinch knot. Both are very strong and reliable if tied correctly. Hope this helps. Good luck! Tim
×
×
  • Create New...