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Pete Collin

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Everything posted by Pete Collin

  1. The thing about using stuff like a FishHawk is that it isn't in the spirit of this low-tech, 19th century way of fishing!
  2. I deliberately bounce bottom and rarely snag. If you want your bottom leader to be, say, 100 feet down, you troll at your target speed in 100 feet of water. Let out enough line to bounce bottom. Mark your wire with the yarn like I show in the video. Then drive out in the middle and troll the thermocline.
  3. Bigfoot, some guys count passes of the reel's level wind as well.
  4. You let the lines partway down, get in your depth, then lower them the rest of the way. You can skip that step if there's two of you. One guy can steer and keep it in your depth while the other sets out the lines.
  5. After a few hours' fishing, you will find which 2 leaders are getting all the hits. So you can reduce it to 2 leaders per rod, simplifying everything.
  6. Always gets crazy when you have two fish on one rod! I think it was you who wrote on the Sanders board that you used to troll right down the middle of Cayuga, never bothering with bottom bouncing.
  7. Hello All, I found that on YouTube there was no mention of Seth Green rigs at all. There's a few showing copper line tutorials, but no Seth Green videos that didn't involve the Austin Powers guy. I had to represent for my home state - folks ought to know about this locally-grown method! Maybe this comes in time to help some of you this season - we have at least a month of good fishing left in the Fingers!
  8. The salmon are getting ready to head upstream. My buddy jay made this video showing some chinook salmon fishing highlights
  9. Hello. I have three hunting leases available for sale. The first is 29 acres in the Town of Wirt, Allegany County, NY. It is mostly a grove of acorn-bearing oak trees. We are asking $590 per year. The second is 250 acres in the Town of Lyndon, Cattaraugus County, NY, It is woods and fields right behind the main farm, has been posted and patrolled for years, has not been hunted in over a decade. We are asking $4,500 per year. The third is 426 acres in the Town of Lyndon, Cattaraugus County, NY. It is woods and fields, swamp, contains a grove of acorn-bearing oak trees. It has a cabin that you may use, but it is derelict and has no electricity. We are asking $7,242 per year. I am a professional forester, working on behalf of the owner. My website is at www.pcforestry.com. You may email me at [email protected] if interested. I will send you maps of the properties, you may inspect them, and can phone me if you are ready to sign a lease for one of them. These are all the leases I have. A lease gives you exclusive rights for all wild game hunting seasons for one calendar year. (excluding fur trapping). You may put up tree stands, but only commercially made ones that do not put screws or nails into the trees. We are managing intensively for sawtimber, so we don't allow cutting of shooting lanes or making feed plots. No camping is allowed on the 2 leases that don't have the cabin on them. ATVs are allowed only for deploying or retrieving tree stands, or for retrieving downed game. I have never hunted these properties, but have a long working experience on all three and can attest that deer and turkey are abundant on all three.
  10. https://13wham.com/news/local/second-floating-island-discovered-on-lake-ontario-coast-guard-monitoring-land-mass?fbclid=IwAR2TA2g2ucI_0jn2QpfxPzzgPX5Z53gYDaN_wE9enO7mAoLY-xh36sSrtFY
  11. Hello All, I am wondering if any of you know a good online source to get replacement latches and locks for Leer truck caps? They always rust out, and I want to replace them myself. The only places I can find are on ebay, and mom and pop looking websites. I no longer have a paypal account, and I don't want to give my credit card to just anybody. Any good links? Peter Collin
  12. Hello All, Brian Gamble is a fisherman that knows his stuff. We launch out of the same port. He has a reputation as a fellow lake trout enthusiast, so I have wanted to meet Brian for some time now. Even so, it has taken me this long to finally spend a morning aboard his well decked-out boat. We were a crew of three, with Keith, Brian's longtime friend, also there. Before the trip, I was fed some impressive, almost inconceivable statistics about catch rates and sizes, without any hedge that is a liar's usual way out. This was to be my first involvement with any fishing derby. I bought a one-day pass to the LOC tournament, and learned a bunch about a world that I had never taken any part in. Competitive fishing makes you look at a day on the water totally differently than somebody who just likes to admire a brown trout's spots. You must put a great deal of time in, find the most bountiful waypoints, target only the largest fish, efficiently maintain your spread of rods, compare your catches against everyone else on the entire lake. This was quickly rammed home to me when I landed a beautiful 12 pound brown trout, the biggest I had caught in years, and looked for the high-five that never came. "Aww! What a bummer! I thought for sure we were on the board with that one!" These were clearly not your average guys! At that time, Brian was second place in the brown trout category, so we needed one bigger than his to rank among the contenders. My fish fought strong, kept persistently distant. As we speculated to its size, I learned all about the issue of money on the line. It was quite a revelation. Even after splitting the winnings among the boat and crew, here I was cranking in a fish that would potentially pay me an amount of money that many guys would pay for the privilege of catching! So as flushed and happy as catching that fish made me, Brian and Keith literally had bigger fish to fry. So the early morning was for targeting browns. They bit steady, with few that could be called dinks. The dozen trout we landed made for one of the fastest-action mornings I have ever had. But we weren't done yet! I got to see Brian in action with the lake trout that he has mastered. Very quickly we were into a strong fish that stayed deep long enough for Keith to reel a second fish past before I could land. Again we discussed how big it might be, how big it would have to be, how much of a payday was at stake. When he finally got netted and dumped onto the deck, there was again that funny dynamic of one guy elated and two guys disappointed. P: "Awesome!" K: "Humph. Looks like he's only 17 pounds" B: "Yep. I thought he was bigger, but only seventeen." Out comes the scale. 17.1 pounds. How many that size must you catch to calibrate your eye so accurately? Been so long since I was out on the lake, it looked like Moby Dick to me. The next couple of hours involved a whole lot of reeling. And a lot of the reeling was left to me. Brian, being on the board with a one-prize-per-entrant policy, wasn't going to play the fish. And Keith, having had some recent surgery, offered most of the releases to me. So I got some tired arms! The action seemed nonstop, but again Brian apologized for the dearth of doubles and triples! I really had to admire that level of accomplishment. Boating and trolling involves all kinds of physical awkwardness, with tangled lines, flopping fish, dragging downrigger balls. To watch Brian constantly manipulating the lines, all the while navigating the boat and doling out tasks to Keith and me, was impressive. He and I had discussed doing some vertical jigging for the lakers, but I can see how jigging doesn't go well with derby fishing. Just to give some numbers, we landed 25 lakers, and Brian considered that a slow day. You just cover so much more water trolling, that if prize money is involved, that is the way to go. But I gave him a few of my homemade jigs, so later he can try his luck. For myself, I learned so much about trolling lakers. Funny though, it's advice that I can't really use! What I learned is what all the modern fishing technology can do for your success, and what it can do in the hands a guy that has mastered applying it. So this board is again responsible for me meeting a good couple of guys and having a great morning out.
  13. I'm partial to spin doctors w/fly, flatfish, rapalas, sutton spoons.
  14. Here's the best tutorial online of the technique. https://cayugafisher.net/index.php
  15. I've never been able to keep bearing buddies from falling off.
  16. Many of you hunters are also woodlot owners. I made another instructional forestry video to teach about stumpage versus retail lumber prices.
  17. I heard before that LO has cusk in it, but don't know anybody who has caught one. Anybody ever get one, or are they on the bottom in 400 FOW?
  18. Thanks Rusty! Funny you mention the ribbon cutting one. Because after I photoshopped that one, I wasn't sure if the picture was good enough to use. I wouldn't put ANY money into making videos. My channel just doesn't get the views to justify the expense! But I very much enjoy the encouragement I get from all of you.
  19. Thank you so much Les - and I will be in line for your book!
  20. Hello All, I've written articles on here before, and put up videos before, but this time I tried combining the two. This is a story about an old, great secret spot I had that no longer exists.
  21. The nice thing about Garcia Ambassadeur reels is that there are many, many used ones out there that you can get for about $30. They are solid and should last your lifetime.
  22. It might depend on how much fishing you do. Back when I used to hit the tribs hard every spring and fall, I could expect a number of steelhead that were about 32 inches. Once you got bigger than that, they became exponentially more rare. If you fish hard every year, chances are you will get a bigger one than that eventually. By all means take a lot of pictures, framing and lighting them carefully. I have never gotten a fish mounted, but I have scores of fish pictures that I enjoy looking through.
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