Captain's Cove

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  • Location
    14339 Roosevelt Hwy, Waterport, NY 14571
  • Home Port
    Point Breeze

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  1. Just a friendly reminder that we have plenty of Cut Bait Milkfish and Green & Blue Label Herring Strips still in stock.
  2. Captain's Cove

    Northern Kings Lures

    Rob, call my cell at 585-590-2474.
  3. Comprehensive and region specific guides for all health advice on eating fish caught from New York State waters. Advice is organized by region and by waterbody for all fresh and marine waters with advisories. Guides provide advice for women over age 50 and men, and special advice for women of childbearing age (under age 50) and children (under age 15). http://www.health.ny.gov/forms/order_forms/fish_order_form.pdf
  4. Just arrived at Captains Cove today, May 21, 2015, Green Label Whole Herring Strips, Blue Label Whole Herring Strips and Premium Trolling Strips, all from Dreamweaver. The Premium Trolling Strips are milkfish. Call or email to reserve your Meat or for more info. Captain's Cove 585-682-3316 [email protected]
  5. Hello All, I have an opportunity to buy Big Jon Otter Boats that are considered "seconds" although they look pretty darn perfect to me. Maybe the color is a little less bright and there may not be enough color on the edges but they are a pretty decent price: only $105 each or two for $200 (plus tax). I have to let Big Jon know by Monday, April 27 if I want them or not. So, if you'd like me to order one or more for you, please call me at 585-682-3316 before Monday, April 25 at noon. You would have to pick the otter boats up in the store. I can ship them but the shipping will be extra and they are heavy. Thank you. ~ Michele Captain's Cove
  6. Great Lakes Action Agenda Public WorkshopsThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation sent this bulletin on 01/09/2015 03:23 PM EST You're Invited! Attend a Great Lakes Action Agenda Public Workshop New York Sea Grant and NYSDEC's Great Lakes watershed program are hosting a series of public workshops across New York's Great Lakes basin to provide information on the Great Lakes Action Agenda, to discuss the proposed strategy for implementing the Agenda, and to seek input on priorities for achieving watershed health across the region. Please join us for one or more of the following workshops: WATERTOWN -- Wednesday, January 28th, 3-5pm Cornell Cooperative Extension of Jefferson County 203 North Hamilton Street Watertown, NY 13601 AUBURN -- Thursday, January 29th, 3-5pm Cornell Cooperative Extension of Cayuga County 248 Grant Avenue, Suite I Auburn, NY 13021-1495 CANANDAIGUA -- Thursday, February 5th, 3-5pm Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County 480 North Main Street Canandaigua, NY 14424 LAKE ERIE BASIN -- Wednesday, February 4th, 3-5pm Venue confirmation pending - details will be forthcomingAn optional discussion and networking session will be held from 5-6pm, following each of the workshops. Please register! There is no cost to attend these workshops but pre-registration is required with NY Sea Grant at [email protected] or 315-312-3042. DRAFT workshop agenda: Welcome and introductions New York's Great Lakes Action AgendaImplementation plan Funding approach and opportunities Strategies to move forwardDesign and operation of regional workgroups Optional: A networking reception will be held from 5-6pm
  7. DEC and NY Sea Grant Announce $89,000 in Grants for Great Lakes Basin Projects - A New DEC Press Release The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation sent this bulletin on 01/14/2015 11:19 AM EST DEC and NY Sea Grant Announce $89,000 in Grants for Great Lakes Basin Projects Funding will help Great Lakes Basin communities increase resiliency to extreme storm eventsIn partnership with New York Sea Grant, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens today announced $89,000 in grants for four projects that will help Great Lakes coastal communities to increase storm resiliency and protect water quality. "New York remains vulnerable to the effects of climate change, especially from more frequent severe storms," said Commissioner Martens. "Each project receiving funding has proposed a solution to address these problems locally, to ultimately reduce risk to communities and ecosystems and will help our communities become stronger and more resilient." "New York Sea Grant looks forward to administering these awards and working with the recipients to ensure that the documents produced, data generated, and lessons learned are available to all of our Great Lakes communities and stakeholders," said New York Sea Grant Associate Director Katherine E. Bunting-Howarth. Coastal communities along 700 miles of New York Great Lakes' shoreline are vulnerable to storm surges, flooding, shoreline erosion, and the impact of overdevelopment. Inland communities also experience flooding and erosion as a result of wetland loss and degradation, improper stream management, and excessive development of floodplains. Grants will be awarded to the following organizations: Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper: $24,482 to improve coastal resilience and community stewardship along Grand Island's shoreline by engaging shoreline property owners and municipal officials through a combination of technical assistance, and public outreach and education. Program activities will target stretches of shoreline experiencing significant erosion and habitat degradation problems. Wayne County Soil & Water Conservation District, in partnership with the Village of Sodus Point: $25,000 to use a combination of natural vegetation and rock to stabilize an eroding section of shoreline and protect nearby at-risk sewage infrastructure in the Village of Sodus Point. Ultimately, this project will strengthen coastal resiliency by protecting wastewater infrastructure and reducing vulnerability to erosion and coastal storm impacts. Oswego County Soil & Water Conservation District: $25,000 to use an ecosystem-based management approach to identify and assess available shoreline management methods for the North Pond inlet and coastal dune barrier of Eastern Lake Ontario. The project's findings will be used to inform an inlet management plan that balances the needs and uses of the local community, while achieving ecological stability within this unique barrier-pond ecosystem. Stony Brook University: $14,985 to investigate the potential impact of seiches--standing waves commonly caused by wind--on beach erosion along New York's Lake Erie shoreline. This project may have important resiliency implications for coastal engineering practices, which have not typically considered seiches in shoreline protection design. New York's Great Lakes Basin Small Grants Program is a project of the state Environmental Protection Fund's Ocean-Great Lakes Ecosystem Conservation Program. Grant projects support the goals of an Interim NYS Great Lakes Action Agenda, a plan for applying ecosystem-based management to complex environmental problems in order to conserve, protect and enhance our irreplaceable Great Lakes natural resources. For more information on the Interim NYS Great Lakes Action Agenda, visit DEC's website. For more information on the grant projects (Offsite Link), go to www.nyseagrant.org.
  8. DEC Studying Ongoing Salmon River Steelhead Disorder Nutritional Deficiency Strongly Implicated in Increased Steelhead Mortality in Lake Ontario Tributaries DEC Taking Steps to Meet Egg Quotas to Ensure Robust Steelhead Population Adult steelhead (a strain of rainbow trout) returning from Lake Ontario to the Salmon River in Oswego County are exhibiting signs of stress and elevated mortality rates due to an apparent thiamine (vitamin B) deficiency, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. DEC scientists enlisted the help of fish health experts in other agencies and academia to determine the cause of this disorder. DEC staff submitted moribund Salmon River steelhead to the Cornell University Aquatic Animal Health Program for testing. Results indicate that fish pathogens are not responsible for the abnormal behavior and mortality. DEC also sent steelhead samples to the U.S. Geological Survey's Northern Appalachian Research Laboratory for further lab testing. Results strongly indicate a severe thiamine (vitamin B) deficiency, which means it is likely contributing to the steelhead mortality. "Lake Ontario steelhead are an important component of Lake Ontario's sport fishery and DEC is deeply concerned about reports of steelhead stress and mortality in the Salmon River and other Lake Ontario tributaries," Commissioner Martens said. "Steelhead provide high-quality sport fisheries in the open lake and are especially sought after by anglers who fish in tributaries from fall through spring. DEC staff will continue to work closely with federal agencies, Cornell University and other stakeholders to identify the cause of the current situation and strategies to ensure a robust steelhead population." In mid-November, DEC fisheries staff began to receive reports of steelhead swimming erratically in the Salmon River and higher mortality of the species. More recent reports indicate similar behavior in steelhead in other Lake Ontario tributaries. Steelhead are an important component of Lake Ontario's sport fishery, which a Cornell University study valued at over $112 million in angler expenditures in New York annually. Great Lakes fish predators (including salmon and steelhead) that feed primarily on alewife are prone to thiamine deficiency. Alewife, an invasive bait fish in the Great Lakes, are known to contain thiaminase, an enzyme that degrades thiamine. A thiamine deficiency can impact egg quality and the survival of eggs and newly hatched fish, and, in severe cases, can cause the death of adult fish. DEC is taking steps to meet its spring 2015 steelhead egg-take targets at Salmon River Hatchery, and will work with Great Lakes agency partners to provide assistance in meeting egg take quotas, if needed. Staff from DEC's Rome Fish Disease Control Unit and Salmon River Hatchery are preemptively injecting adult steelhead returning to the hatchery with thiamine. Thiamine-injected fish will be held in outdoor raceways at the hatchery and fed a diet fortified with vitamin B to improve the likelihood of successful steelhead egg collections in 2015. However, little can be done to alleviate the mortality of adult steelhead that are unable to ascend the river and reach the hatchery's holding facilities. Although moderate thiamine deficiencies are not uncommon in top predator fish such as salmon, lake trout and steelhead in Lake Ontario and other waters, this year's acute deficiency is atypical in its severity. DEC staff will continue to collaborate with experts to further understand the circumstances leading to this year's mortality. For more information, contact DEC's Bureau of Fisheries (Cape Vincent Fisheries Station) at (315) 654-2147.
  9. Hello, The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation has issued the following press release: DEC Announces New Proposed Freshwater Sportfishing Regulations Public Comments Accepted Through December 1, 2014 Regulations Schedule to be Effective April 2015 The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is accepting comments on proposed changes to the freshwater fishing regulations through December 1, 2014, Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. "New York provides some of the best fishing in the nation, and the continuous assessment and modification of sportfishing regulations helps ensure that this remains the case," said Commissioner Martens. "I encourage anglers to review what is being proposed and provide input if they wish to do so during the public comment period." DEC modifies the sportfishing regulations approximately every two years as part of DEC's commitment to enhance fishing opportunities and protect the State's freshwater resources. DEC assessed the status of existing freshwater sportfish populations and the desires of anglers in developing the proposed regulations. In addition, many of the proposed changes are the result of DEC's efforts to consolidate regulations where possible and eliminate special regulations that are no longer warranted or have become outdated. The new sportfishing regulations are scheduled to take effect on April 1, 2015. The regulations in the 2013-14 Freshwater Fishing Regulations Guide will remain in effect until the new regulations are enacted. Once enacted, a new regulations guide will be available. To receive input early in the process, DEC made the proposed changes available to the public on its website in July 2013. The early feedback helped DEC determine which regulation changes to advance further or to eliminate from further consideration. Comments on the proposals can be sent by email to [email protected] or mailed to Shaun Keeler, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Bureau of Fisheries, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4753. The full text of the proposed regulations are also available on DEC's website at www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/propregulations.html. The proposed changes include: Establish a closed statewide season for sauger, an extremely rare fish species in New York for which DEC completed a conservation plan in 2013; Modify the statewide regulation for muskellunge by increasing the minimum size limit to 40 inches and lengthen the season by three weeks to start on the last Saturday in May; Provide consistency between the proposed statewide muskellunge regulation changes and the existing muskellunge regulations for specific waters including Lake Champlain, and St. Lawrence County rivers and streams, as well as for both muskellunge and tiger muskellunge at Chautauqua Lake; Increase the minimum size limit for muskellunge to 54 inches in the Niagara River, Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River; Increase the minimum size limit for walleye at Honeoye Lake from 15 to 18 inches; Establish year round trout seasons, with catch and release fishing only from October 16 through March 31, in the following streams in Western New York: Chenunda Creek, Oatka Creek, Clear Creek, Fenton Brook, Prendergast Creek, and waters in Allegany State Park; Initiate a catch and release season for trout for sections of the Salmon River (Franklin County) and Ninemile Creek (Onondaga County), and extend the catch and release season at Fall Creek (Cayuga Lake); Establish a special trout regulation of a daily creel limit of five fish with no more than two fish longer than 12 inches, in Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Oneida and St. Lawrence counties, Little River and Oswegatchie River in St. Lawrence County, Millsite Lake in Jefferson County, and Oriskany Creek (Oneida County); Establish an all-year trout season, with a 12-inch minimum size limit and daily limit of three fish, at Hinckley and Prospect Reservoirs in Herkimer and Oneida counties, North Lake in Herkimer County, for an additional section of the North Branch Saranac River in Franklin and Clinton counties, as well as for the entire set of waters that are a part of the Massawepie Easement; Apply the current trout and salmon special regulations for the Fulton Chain of lakes to the connected water body Old Forge Pond; Establish a 15-inch minimum size limit for lake trout and clarify that the statewide regulations apply for other species for Owasco Outlet (Cayuga County); Modify trout and/or salmon regulations for Star Lake and Trout Lake (St. Lawrence County), by increasing the minimum size limit for trout to 12 inches and reducing the daily creel limit to three. Allow fishing all year for landlocked salmon in Star Lake, with ice fishing permitted; Establish an open year-round trout season for Sylvia Lake (St. Lawrence County), with a 12-inch minimum size limit and three fish daily creel limit, with ice fishing permitted; Extend Great Lakes tributary Regulations upstream to the section of the Genesee River (Monroe County) from State Route 104 Bridge upstream to the Lower Falls; Exempt Old Seneca Lake Inlet from the Finger Lakes tributary regulations. Adjust the allowable fishing hours for Spring Creek on the Caledonia Fish Hatchery property by a half hour; and Clarify in regulation a definition for "catch and release fishing" as well as define the limitations of handling the incidental catch of untargeted species. Several changes to eliminate special regulations that are no longer warranted, and where the statewide regulations can be applied include to: Delete the special minimum size and daily creel limit walleye regulation for Fern Lake (Clinton County), Lake Algonquin (Hamilton County), and Franklin Falls Flow, Lower Saranac Lake and Rainbow Lake in Franklin County, and Tully Lake (Onondaga County); Eliminate the special regulations (examples being minimum size limit, daily creel limit, season length and/or method of take) for trout, landlocked salmon and/or lake trout, at several waters including Schoharie Reservoir, Susquehanna River (between Otsego and Goodyear Lakes), Launt Pond (Delaware County), Basswood Pond (Otsego County), Lake Algonquin (Hamilton County), Jennings Park Pond (Hamilton County), Hoosic River and Little Hoosic River (Rensselaer County), Hudson River (Saratoga County), Clear and Wheeler Ponds (Herkimer County), Cold Brook (St. Lawrence County), and West Branch of the St. Regis River (St. Lawrence County); Eliminate the special brown trout and landlocked salmon regulations (minimum size limit, daily creel limit and season length) at Otsego Lake; Eliminate the 10-inch minimum size limit for black bass at Lily Pond and Pack Forest Lake in Warren County, eliminate the "all year - any size" special regulation for black bass at Cayuta Creek in Tioga County, and adopt a consistent minimum size limit for black bass for sections of the Schoharie Creek at 10 inches; Eliminate the daily creel limit special regulation for sunfish and yellow perch in Cumberland Bay (Lake Champlain); Eliminate the minimum size limit special regulation for lake trout in the Essex Chain of Lakes; Eliminate the separate special regulation for trout for Ischua Creek, and apply the Cattaraugus County regulation; and Delete the special regulation for Follensby Clear Pond (Franklin County) that permits ice fishing but prohibits the use of tip-ups. Proposed changes that are Baitfish and non-game fish related include to: Prohibit the use of fish as bait in newly acquired trout waters: Fish Hole Pond and Balsam Pond in Franklin County; and Clear Pond in Washington County; Remove the baitfish prohibition on Harlow Lake, Genesee County; Remove all the currently listed eligible waters for the commercial collection of baitfish: in Clinton County except Lake Champlain; in Essex County except Lake Champlain and Lake Flower; in Franklin County except Lake Flower, Lower Saranac Lake, Raquette River, Tupper Lake and Upper Saranac Lake; in Fulton County; in Hamilton County except Indian Lake, Lake Pleasant and Long Lake; in Saratoga County except the Hudson River, Lake Lonely and outlet Lake Lonely to Kayaderosseras Creek, Mohawk River and Saratoga Lake; in Warren County except the Hudson River; and in Washington County except the Hudson River and Lake Champlain; Add madtoms and stonecats to the approved list of fish that may be used, collected and sold as baitfish; Eliminate "snatching" of burbot in Scomotion Creek (Clinton County); Eliminate smelt "dipping" in Raquette Lake; Adjust smelt regulations for Cayuga and Owasco Lakes, for consistency with five Western Finger Lakes; Eliminate the prohibition on taking smelt and suckers with a scap or dip net in Willow Creek (Tompkins County); and Remove the allowance for snatching lake whitefish at Otsego Lake. Proposed changes related to gear and use of gear include: Streamline what devices may be used for ice fishing by modifying the statewide regulation to allow for a total of seven ice fishing devices/lines; modify the language pertaining to devices for ice fishing to allow for a total of 15 ice fishing devices/lines for Lake Champlain; Eliminate the gear restrictions at Follensby Clear Pond (Franklin County) that permit ice fishing but prohibit the use of tip-ups; With the exception of the Salmon River, permit the use of floating lures with multiple hooks with multiple hook points, on all Lake Ontario tributaries; Clarify the definition of floating lures on Lake Ontario tributaries to: "A floating lure is a lure that floats while at rest in water with or without any weight attached to the line, leader, or lure"; Clarify that the current regulation for the Great Lake tributaries restricting the use of hooks with added weight was not intended to ban the use of small jigs; Expand the prohibition of weight added to the line, leader, swivels, artificial fly or lures to all Lake Ontario tributaries (i.e. beyond a limited group of tributaries) from September 1 through March 31 of the following year; Clarify that the use of multiple hooks with multiple hook points on Lake Erie tributaries is legal, as well as clarify that the use of flies with up to two hook points is legal on all Great Lake tributaries; Replace Lake Ontario tributary regulations for St. Lawrence River tributaries in Jefferson and St. Lawrence Counties with statewide terminal tackle restrictions; Redefine the upstream limit for spearfishing on the Salmon River (Franklin County); Clarify the description of gear (gill nets) that are allowed in the Finger Lakes for the collection of alewives for personal use as bait; and Reinstate the prohibition on large landing nets (nets larger than 50 inches around the frame or with a handle longer than 20 inches) for Finger Lakes tributaries except for those sections that are specifically identified. In addition to the above, several non-substantive regulation modifications are included to properly establish or clarify an earlier regulation change, better define an existing regulation (by rewording etc.), and/or address regulations that have not changed but are now redundant and covered elsewhere in the regulations including as a result of consolidation. In support of the NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative, this year's budget includes $6 million in NY Works funding to support creating 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have not reached their full potential. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas. In addition, the 2014-15 budget includes $4 million to repair the state's fish hatcheries; and renews and allows expanded use of crossbows for hunting in New York State.
  10. We have sizes 5, 4, 3, and 2 in stock in each of the 4 different colors. Reports are favorable on these new divers, made in the USA in Rochester, NY. Here is their website so you can read more about them and see the awesome colors: http://www.chinookproducts.com/main.sc Please note, I will ship to Canada. Thanks for reading and supporting your local tackle shops.
  11. Effective August 1, 2014 all Shimano rods have a one year limited warranty. Shimano recognizes their new policy is a significant departure from their current policy and they encourage you to read through the list of frequently asked questions they have created: ~ Michele Captain's Cove Resort, Inc. 585-682-3316
  12. Please read the important e-mail below from Orleans County Legislature Chairman Callard regarding the recently released IJC Plan 2014 regulating Lake Ontario water levels and flows. We believe adoption of this plan, with its higher-high and lower-low water levels, would result in devastating damage to south shore tourism businesses and residents. Yet Plan 2014 reportedly lacks any mitigation measures or damage compensation. If you can, please plan to attend the news conference July 2nd at 10:30am @ the Oak Orchard Lighthouse. Thank You! The International Joint Commission last week recommended approval of the new plan for regulating Lake Ontario water levels and St. Lawrence River flows under the new plan named “Plan 2014â€. This plan now awaits approval from the U.S. and Canadian federal governments. Chairman David Callard states that he is very concerned with the billions of dollars of damage that this could cause across the southern shore of Lake Ontario. Orleans County, along with many other county south shore owners and businesses should not be put in such jeopardy by the International Joint Commission. Congressman Chris Collins will be leading a press conference on Wednesday, July 2nd at 10:30 a.m. in the parking lot near the Lighthouse in Point Breeze. Chairman Callard hopes that hundreds of people attend this press conference to show their lack of support in this plan. If you could please attend to help display, in numbers, that this is not a good plan for our property owners and businesses on the shore of Lake Ontario. We ask that you share this date and time with your friends and neighbors who could be affected by the rise and fall of the Lake Ontario water levels. Thank you on behalf of Chairman Callard. Nadine
  13. We just received several cases of Familiar Bite Herring Strips at Captain's Cove. Call to reserve your strips now! Michele and Claude 585-682-3316