Raaven

Members
  • Content count

    173
  • Joined

  • Last visited

2 Followers

About Raaven

  • Rank
    Professional
  • Birthday 04/05/1968

Profile Information

  • Location
    Fulton Ny
  • Interests
    Hunting, fishing, trapping, ADK Hiking
  1. It is called a Seiche.
  2. If what you are doing is not working, change something.
  3. Stop by blue dock #6, Wrights landing, Waterwolf Charters. I will give you all the free info you ask for, to have a successful weekend ! Hope you find a partner.
  4. Yes, Mates do get paid, plus tipped...Yes, i am a USCG Licensed Master Captain as well, with Maritime Consortium card. I have been a full time Mate/ relief captain on Lake Ontario for 37 years. All I was asking was how much you were willing to pay an experienced mate, to get out of bed and go to work.?
  5. How much are you paying? I'm open Sunday morning only. Doubled Saturday and leave dock at 1 pm. Sunday with clients.
  6. After reading and studying all that data.....It seems this is obviously a dying business...
  7. We had no down temp and never thought about down speed. What we used was a thermometer attached to 150' of cable on a hand spool. We would run out to the fishing grounds (120' drop off in front of Alcan, no 5 stacks then) and attach that temp probe to a Proos downrigger with a #16 rubber band, while the boat was out of gear and drifting. We kept lowering the 10 lb. ball down until we found the thermocline. Took note of how many feet down it was, and started trolling. Once we were set up, we had this block of wood that was called a downrigger "computer" that we held up next to the downrigger cable while trolling. The computer would measure the angle of the cable blowback, turn the block around, and a chart on the back would tell you how many feet to add to your downrigger cable to get to the depth you wanted. High tech stuff, state of the art . At the time our best spoons were rattle spoons and sugar spoons. The rattle spoons we bought off Capt. Emil Dean while chartering him on Lake Michigan (Our "go to" source of info) The sugar spoons were small, cup shaped, and had colored Rhine stones glued to them. We had no clue what we were doing........every day was the learning curve....
  8. Ken Budd had the first ever drift boat on the Salmon River. His first year he would pick me up at my fathers house and make me wear my lacrosse helmet and hold a pair of scissors the whole time down the river. Why the helmet and scissors? SNAGGING WAS LEGAL, and he was the first drift boat to backtroll down through the pools of snaggers. Any fishing line that was cast across the hull of the boat had to be cut before the guy would yank the hooks back! Yes, I was hit in the side of the head with a few michigan crickets and was glad I wore that helmet. Oh, and all the chinooks we caught did hit the backtrolled hot shots as well. They were not feeding, but they did strike the plug....violently. Old Hickory spent a bunch of time fishing on The Misty Blue....I remember him fondly....Brian, after all these years you let that cat out of the bag? It used to be a good secret......
  9. I started fishing Lake Ontario in 1975-1976.....All we caught was coho while trolling in front of the salmon river. By 1978 my father was full time chartering out of east side marina in Oswego, I was his first mate weekends and all summer. We had a lot of trips, and no competition. By 1986 I had my captains license, and there were quite a few of today's, "old timers" coming on to the scene. Here is a picture I just found of Oswego east side marina in 1981...notice there were no other fishing boats in it. I believe it was 1983-1984 before the next charter boat came in the marina, two guys actually came the same year, Capt. Ken Bud on his boat of the time, Trout Scout, later to be replaced by Amberjack in 1986.....and Mac Caderet , owner of Fredons Wholesale on Teal Ave, who had none other than Capt. Tony Buffa running his boat at the time....'The Bandito". Mac moved on, Tony bought his 30' Sportcraft "The Bandito II" around 1986...I was his second captain when he was in School or had Oneida Lake trips.
  10. Thanks for the recommendations ! If we are plugging our peers...lets not forget Capt. Paul Corbett. Hands down he was the top producing Guide last fall up there. There are a few more excellent choices of experienced St.Larry guides that all will do their best to put you on a musky, and in the process you will learn at least the techniques they are using that day you are aboard. Sign Man and Waterwolf are usually booked up pretty solid from year to year, so call them soon, or you will not get a date.
  11. Don't waste your time with a spin doctor and a fly....I tried many combinations of that for over 150, ten hour days, over the course of three years on the St.Larry. I caught lake trout on it, but no musky. If it was going to work, it would have in that time frame?
  12. Saturday it was 60 on the surface, down 22 feet it was 43 degrees.
  13. We fished from 8 am.-2 pm. today...North and east of Wilson, 29 line. Besides being a tad bumpy, it was well worth the trip offshore. Teenage kings mixed with steelhead and lakers, one coho.....Spoon bite, three color off the boards worked good.
  14. I think 100-150 feet off either side is about as far as anyone can possibly run a board , before they are actually running behind, instead of beside a boat. If you are closer than that to me on a pass, you are too close . JMO.
  15. Yes, I have been using it a couple seasons now with good results. I push the tuffline back, exposing about 12 inches of leadcore, cut the lead. Then tie an albright knot if using long leaders, or a palomar to a swivel for short leaders.