rolling@trolling

1987 crestliner 24 foot saber g/l.

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New to the site: I'm wondering if anybody has replaced the wooden part of the transom

I have replaced the transoms on 4 boats it's a project and not something to take on if you are in a hurry or not that handy with wood working tools or the ability to adapt and overcome in such a situation that you might think it's a short cut that will bite you in the as$ later in the project. An other thing you need to be experienced in is fiberglass work, which I had some of each and it came in handy especially in the fiberglass end of the job. The trick is to keep the outside piece of glass as intact as much as possible, then cut the inside away to get at the 3/4 ply board. Having worked at a stair making facility I made the whole transom piece out of 5/4 board green decking mat. I planed both sides glued them together in a glue rack and then planed them down to 3/4 so we had a solid piece of pressure treated board 4ft tall by 3/4 thick and what ever length was needed, then start putting everything back together. Usually takes me 3 days. 

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I replaced the transom board on my '95 Crestliner Eagle. It's a project but doable.

The removal was a little tough. Remove the outboard with a hoist and made a stand on wheels for it.

Took off the cap (easy) but removing some of the bolts from the transom braces were a challenge because the bolts were installed at the factory then the covers for the top one were welded in place in the splash well so I had to cut through them to access the bolts.

Once those were removed the transom board lifted out with a little persuasion from the same motor hoist and some eye bolts.

I then used the old board as a pattern for the outline and bolt pattern.

The thickness was 1 3/4 inches so I bought the best plywood available with exterior grade glue. Two layers of 1/2 inch to the outside and the 3/4 toward the inside was screwed and glued together using stainless screws and west system epoxy. Then several coats on the outside to seal completely. Pay attention to the bolt holes epoxy seal. Of course not all will line up perfectly so some might have to be touched up while test fitting in the transom with a drill.

I replaced all the bolts and sealed them with 3M marine sealer (silicone is not recommended below water line).

Bolted everything back up and reinstalled outboard and hooked up and adjusted throttle and steering cables. Retro fitted some covers and sealed them on the cut outs I had to make to access the brace bolts.

Turned out well and have been in use for two years. Was definitely an upgrade from original factory job because all they used was raw unsealed marine grade plywood. Should last me the rest of my life. Good luck. Not "easy" but not impossible either.

Edited by IRon

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Hi - Newbie here.

 

I am doing a pre-purchase on a 1994 Crestliner Sabre V205 with Volvo I/O. My first question is about the transom construction. The factory video and online info says that some boats have a plywood transom while others have composite.

 

How can I easily tell which one I have without removing the leg? When I look aft of the engine, I see plywood - but this doesn't make sense - doesn't Crestliner sandwich the transom between two sheets of welded aluminum?

 

Second question; how tough of a job is it to replace the wooden transom - if that is what I have? I have done a fibreglass boat once - Is it about the same in difficulty? Is there any welding required?

 

Thanks - in advance!

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