Lucky13

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Everything posted by Lucky13

  1. Lucky13

    Lake Sturgeon Restoration

    The restoration Program in Cayuga has been going on for a lot longer. Life History Lake sturgeon spawn in the spring from May-June. Prior to spawning, adult sturgeon form groups in deep holes near the spawning site. At this time, the sturgeon may perform "staging" displays that include rolling near the bottom then leaping out of the water to fall with a loud splash. Actual spawning takes place in areas of clean, large rubble such as along windswept rocky shores of islands and in rapids in streams. The eggs are scattered by currents and stick to rocks and logs. Young hatch out in 5-8 days and grow rapidly, reaching 7.5 inches by the end of the first growing season. A mature female lake sturgeon may lay from 100,000-800,000 eggs during a single spawning season. The lake sturgeon is one of the longest-lived and slowest to mature freshwater fish species. Female lake sturgeon do not reach sexual maturity until 14-23 years old and may live up to 80 years. Male lake sturgeon reach sexual maturity at 8-19 years old and can live to 55 years of age. In 1953, a 154 year old lake sturgeon was caught in Lake of the Woods, Canada. It weighted 208.5 pounds.
  2. Lucky13

    LL Salmon stocking in 2019- bad news...

    They were very good for both Rainbows and Landlocks until someone (not DEC, according to them they only stocked tiger muskies to control the Golden Shiners in Second Lake) introduced the northerns. They still produce fish, and remain good Laker lakes, but not like before the esocids
  3. Lucky13

    LL Salmon stocking in 2019- bad news...

    The Northerns up in the Fulton Chain will be a little skinnier!
  4. Lucky13

    Hemlock hemlock or cayuga

    Also 17' or under except for canoes.
  5. Lucky13

    Lake Sturgeon Restoration

    It might be appropriate to remind people that the success of this program is dependent on survival and return of these fish, which have been stocked in limited numbers ( <1000 in 2017, 4th or 5th time in the ~15 years), which is hindered by catching them on hook and line. Also, because they are a threatened species with no open season, targeting them is not legal, even if "catch and release." I know that Dr. Dittman of USGS BRD at Tunison Lab would be very appreciative of these fish being left alone as much as possible. Looking at the size of the big one, the males are waiting and only have a couple of years to go before the females should come back, and maybe they can spawn successfully.
  6. It is all in the reports, but you would have to take the time to read them.
  7. See FAQ section at http://www.lrb.usace.army.mil/Missions/Civil-Works/District-Projects/Braddock-Bay/ You just need to "expand all" and the answers are.there. But you knew that!
  8. The only dredging associated with this project is obtaining sand from the channel area to the west of the stone Headlands barriers, which will open up the navigation channel and will be used to cover the stone and support vegetative plantings. Here, for the umpteenth time, is the link to the USACE project information page. I believe it is posted in this thread already, so I have to wonder if it makes any sense to repost, as reading skills are apparently in very short supply lately. But just in case: http://www.lrb.usace.army.mil/Missions/Civil-Works/District-Projects/Braddock-Bay/
  9. Lucky13

    Laker with worms around stomach?

    Did these worms squirm a lot? Did you isolate them from the Stomach and intestines? If no, it sounds like it may have been the Pyloric Cecae, which are worm like projections of the intestines that throw folks off when they are first cleaning fish.
  10. Lucky13

    Daily Limits Between Two Countries

    Yes, you could tie up all the ECO's with questions, or you could just read the book, which clearly spells out that you are not allowed to be in possession of more than the daily NYS limit while you are on the waters of the State. If you don't trust the regulations guide, you could go right to the actual Codes, Rules, and Regulations , which is where the NYS Law sends you on this issue, and what the ECO will be working from. To quote from NYSCRR (6-CRR NY 10.2) Boundary Waters (my bold added) : "10.2 Boundary water fishing regulations. (a) Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, Niagara River and St. Lawrence River. (1) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 10.1 of this Part and in accordance with Table A in paragraph (2) of this subdivision, no person, when fishing in Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, Niagara River and St. Lawrence River and their tributaries upstream to the first barrier impassable to fish except tributaries to the St. Lawrence River in Franklin County and Clinton County which are exempt from regulations in this section, shall take or possess on these waters or the shores thereof fish of the species listed: (i) other than during the open season specified for such species; (ii) of a size less than that specified for such species; and (iii) in excess of the daily limit specified for such species." and excerpted from (2): Walleye First Saturday of May through March 15 18″ 3
  11. No, I had the greydog for getting from Binghamton to Rochester.
  12. Lucky13

    Daily Limits Between Two Countries

    The regulations guide states: A person may not have in possession, or intentionally kill or injure fish other than the sizes specified and allowed for that species on a given water. A person may not possess, kill or unnecessarily injure fish in excess of the daily limit for that species Does not say anything about "except if caught in another country, state" etc.. You would be in possession of one fish over your NYS limit returning to port in New York State. Maybe an ECO would cut you the slack, but do you really want to risk it for one set of fillets? Also, remember that on the Canadian side they play hardball with violations and could confiscate your boat if you are over one of their "lines."
  13. http://www.dec.ny.gov/about/38596.html http://www.dec.ny.gov/about/726.html http://www.dec.ny.gov/about/34336.html
  14. When I was in college, I had to get home the day after classes ended so I could start work the following Monday, and I stopped working on the Friday before classes started, the good old days LOL! But there may be something going at NYS launches around Mexico Bay or on Oneida, although it might be run by someone else like CNY Regional Planning or TNC (who did some of the knotweed work on the Salmon River) around Syracuse.
  15. Could it also be possible that a number of the ones stocked in Kueka head down the outlet for "the Ocean," which turns out to be Seneca?
  16. You list Carthage as home, if there is a site they are doing nearby, he likely has a better chance
  17. https://cpb-us-w2.wpmucdn.com/www.paulsmiths.edu/dist/f/44/files/2017/12/2018-Job-Announcement-2agxtm8.pdf
  18. Lucky13

    Conesus walleye reproduction?

    According to NYSDEC, "Fish Management Conesus Lake has traditionally been a productive fishery for warmwater sportfish and panfish. Northern pike, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass and walleye comprise the sportfishery; yellow perch, bluegills, pumpkinseed and brown bullhead are the principal panfish. Over the years the species balance has shifted. During the 1960's, Conesus produced an outstanding walleye fishery which diminished through the 1970's. During this same time, Conesus was locally famous for its remarkable yellow perch ice fishing. However, this fishery declined throughout the 1980's most likely due to a population explosion of newly arrived, unwanted alewives that directly competed with young perch for their preferred food - large zooplankton (microscopic animals). It is also likely that the abundant alewives consumed perch fry. Currently, Conesus produced excellent fishing for both bass species, northern pike, bluegills and sunfish. Based on on-going DEC studies, the walleye population is increasing in response to annual stocking of hatchery fingerlings. The yellow perch population also exhibits signs of improvement. Additionally, beginning in 1991, DEC began stocking Conesus with tiger muskies - a fast growing, sterile hybrid between northern pike and muskellunge. Early indications are that this striking fish will add an element of excitement to the fishery." They must feel that the spawners contribute, however, as they closed the Inlet to all fishing during the run.
  19. Gator pretty well sums it up. Pressure on the bait from predator levels at the top and reduced nutrients at the bottom, lots of bait, but way less than before non native salmonids were introduced. Stocking numbers are way down from what was put in at the start, but there is significant natural reproduction of Kings, at least in the Salmon River. Some biologists say that the kings will adapt to food changes, others say they are primarily herring(alewife) feeders. Reports from Michigan indicate that they did not switch right over to bloater when the alewife population got smaller. Steve LaPan of NYSDEC will be the first to admit that they are managing for the bait now, and being conservative.
  20. Lucky13

    Genesee Charter Boat Association FREE Kid Derby

    until

    Thanks for the clarification. Good luck and great effort!!
  21. Lucky13

    Genesee Charter Boat Association FREE Kid Derby

    until

    Cap'n Hammond, Is the derby being held on Club Terrace which appears to be the Yacht Club Driveway, or is it held at the Pubic Fishing Access site at the end of St Paul Blvd.? And what ages fall into the category of Kid?" Thanks
  22. We have not seen the results from last year yet. While there are 2015 fish around, they are not out there in great numbers The 2016 hatch,, which was reported on as one year olds in 2017, was very strong, but we are still waiting to see how last year's hatch made it through the winter. At the SOL meetings, Brian Weidel showed a graph that said it could go either way. No one who went out has said anything, or no one went out!
  23. That was not an outlier, that is the long term trend, although it has risen , and been relatively static over about the last 20 years. Dr. Edward Mills coined the term "oligotrophication" to describe the cleaning up of Lake Ontario, basically the opposite of eutrophication. Read the section of the report I linked, it is all there, and the nutrient and chlorophyll trends are well graphed. To quote from the discussion,"Secchi depth, chl-a, and TP are indicators of lake trophic status (Carlson 1977). In 2016,average Apr-Oct values for all sites ranged from ... 5.2- 9.9 µg/L TP.... These values are within the range for oligotrophic (low productivity) systems (...1-10 µg/L TP; Wetzel, 2001)" I only included Total Phosphorus, but all are in range. Another graph from the Internet. 96-2001 are all in the oligotrophic region. .
  24. "Whiting" is related to concentration of Calcium Carbonate. Deep water phosphorus concentrations have declined from the greater than 25 µg/l levels that produced the "pea soup" we saw in the late 60's to the ~7 µg/L concentration minimum of a few years ago. The nutrients controlling productivity in water bodies are the same as in fertilizer, N, P, and K, with P indicated as the limiting nutrient in Lake Ontario. Overall nutrient and phytoplankton levels in Lake Ontario are tracked as part of the trophic state monitoring conducted by Cornell Biological field station in conjunction with NYSDEC and others, and reported on in the State of the Lake reports (Last one was 2016, still waiting on 2017) I refer you to the discussion section of Section 16 of the report, 2016 Status of the Lake Ontario Lower Trophic Levels, which indicates that phosphorus levels remain at or below the 10 µg/L goal set for the Lake, and within the range associated with nutrient poor, oligotrophic lakes. https://www.michigan.gov/documents/deq/deq-oea-cau-whitings_415030_7.pdf http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/fish_marine_pdf/lorpt16b.pdf
  25. It is also a matter of what kind of algae. Blue greens, or cyanobacteria, are the big drinking water threat. According to Dr Greg Boyer of SUNY ESF, there are 6 factors that contribute to the blooms: Nutrient level, Light, Changing water temperatures, calm winds, seed populations, and grazers like the mussels. The only one readily susceptible to control is nutrient levels. Anglers should also be aware that ANY contact with blooms is now considered bad, so if you are trolling along and encounter a bloom, it is a good idea to glove up for the pickup, and then move. I have not heard of any open water blooms on Lake Ontario, but certainly some of the embayments like Sodus have experienced blooms. https://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/77118.html https://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/77145.html Other algae blooms, like the nearshore proliferation of grass greens like cladophora, are definitely a negative for lakeshore residents, and can lead to taste and or problems. Deepwater blooms on Lake Ontario are ubnlikely because the syatem as nutrient poor, despite the input from Lake Erie, which is manly impacted in the Western Basin due to the Maumee River. Of greater concern for the salmonid populations of Lake Ontario is status of the alewife population, which appears to be most impacted by predator demand and winter conditions, but is also limited by open water phytoplankton(algae) levels limited by nutrient levels . The quandary for managers is that they can only control predator demand by stocking reductions, and they have to make these decisions a few years before they will have an effect, so they have been forced to act conservatively, too much so for many of the anglers. But if the size of the Kings starts to drop off drastically, it is possible that they have underestimated demand So far, that is not happening, and a side benefit of too few predators would be at least some "monsters" showing up.