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My current copper setups are

2-150’s

2-200’s

1-300’

1-400

1-500’s

 

I have 2 new reels I want to put copper on, my original thought was to have another 300 and a 400 but my question is if you guys had limited space on the boat would you add a 250 and a 350 to split differences or double up the 3 and 400?

 

Fish out of a small boat and only have a places for 6 rods that aren’t in use and usually fish with 2 people so I have 6 extra rods and a 6 rod spread.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

 

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I have a 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 450, 500 and a 550. I had duplicates of 200,300,400 and 500’s but found 50’ increments were better most days.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app

 

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I have a 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 450, 500 and a 550. I had duplicates of 200,300,400 and 500’s but found 50’ increments were better most days.
 
 
Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app
 

That’s exactly what I wanted to hear, thanks! Anyone else have input?


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Brian gave you some real good advice. Something I would add is that long coppers take a long time to reel in even with the right gear ratio reels.This can be significant if you have inexperienced or young folks reeling them in. Additionally it can be hard on the fish if you intend to release them.  You can also get increased depth on shorter dedicated coppers such as 200's and 300's by adding snap weights to them shortening the distance in reeling them in. You can get an estimate of how much weight  does what to them by attaching a Fishhawk TD setup at a given speed say 2.0 mph. Notice that I said "estimate" because that is just what it is as is running them clean because there are a lot of factors that govern how deep or shallow they actually run (e.g. variations in boat speed, underwater currents. what you have as a lure, use of attractors before the lure etc. and the TD itself) but it does give a better idea than just guessing.

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Brian gave you some real good advice. Something I would add is that long coppers take a long time to reel in even with the right gear ratio reels.This can be significant if you have inexperienced or young folks reeling them in. Additionally it can be hard on the fish if you intend to release them.  You can also get increased depth on shorter dedicated coppers such as 200's and 300's by adding snap weights to them shortening the distance in reeling them in. You can get an estimate of how much weight  does what to them by attaching a Fishhawk TD setup at a given speed say 2.0 mph. Notice that I said "estimate" because that is just what it is as is running them clean because there are a lot of factors that govern how deep or shallow they actually run (e.g. variations in boat speed, underwater currents. what you have as a lure, use of attractors before the lure etc. and the TD itself) but it does give a better idea than just guessing.

Absolutely, I use snap weights often, I refuse to run a copper longer than 400’


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Posted (edited)

Yeah and someone doing it doesn't have to exercise or workout any more either:lol:

Edited by Sk8man
  • Like 1

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On 6/24/2019 at 7:13 AM, Sk8man said:

Brian gave you some real good advice. Something I would add is that long coppers take a long time to reel in even with the right gear ratio reels.This can be significant if you have inexperienced or young folks reeling them in. Additionally it can be hard on the fish if you intend to release them.  You can also get increased depth on shorter dedicated coppers such as 200's and 300's by adding snap weights to them shortening the distance in reeling them in. You can get an estimate of how much weight  does what to them by attaching a Fishhawk TD setup at a given speed say 2.0 mph. Notice that I said "estimate" because that is just what it is as is running them clean because there are a lot of factors that govern how deep or shallow they actually run (e.g. variations in boat speed, underwater currents. what you have as a lure, use of attractors before the lure etc. and the TD itself) but it does give a better idea than just guessing.

Hi I know this is kind of old I was just going through threads on copper as I just am setting my first copper rigs up. I like the snap weight idea, I assume you are clipping to the backing? If so, any rule of thumb as to how much backing you are to let out before attaching the snap weight?

 

I do have a Fish hawk TD also

 

Thanks

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I usually clip mine to the backing right above the  #8 Spro swivel that leads to the copper  OR near the one that leads to the fluoro leader on the copper. I haven't ever had any problems attaching it anywhere in terms of line damage as the soft pinch pads attached to the weight doesn't do anything to the line or wire itself

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