Sk8man

Professional
  • Content count

    7,831
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Sk8man

  • Rank
    Professional
  • Birthday

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Canandaigua NY
  • Interests
    Freshwater and saltwater fishing, photography, boating, and writing
  • Home Port
    Canandaigua, Geneva, Sodus Point
  • Boat Name
    White Porcupine (18 ft.Boston Whaler Ventura)

Recent Profile Visitors

31,546 profile views
  1. One other thing you might want to try to keep weeds off is to place a large split shot about three or four feet up the line from your lure. I know it helps while toplining for trout and fishing for walleyes
  2. I only use 6 ft. 1 piece roller rods for wire rigs but I keep the tension on the wire at all times in storage with a small bungi cord which eliminates the mono etc.
  3. Warning!!!! - Poor man's shrimp can be highly addictive
  4. If nail polish used make it the acrylic hardner top coat type . It will hold up for awhile but also can peel off after.
  5. While talking about letting out wiith copper or wire it is also a good idea to never "free spool" it with your thumb as you might woith say a downrigger or topline but rather loosen the drag till the copper or wire lets itsself out under tension and increase the boat speed to let out more line while still under tension
  6. Never Ends you have a PM
  7. I didn't want to say this publicly but I bought a 2016 9.8 Tohatsu this season and am not real satisfied with it. My buuddy also bought one the week before me and has had problems with it (vibration). I thought it woulkd be much quieter than it is and would be much more economical than my 2 stroke 9.9 Johnson but it doesn't seem like it is. . If I were to do it over I would go with   a Merc or Honda 15 horse.Despite the fact that Tohatsu makes the small Merc motors they are to different specs than the Tohatsu brand and I think a better option (couple friends have them). The 15 horse would be the best option as it gives you a bit more oomph with less effort which ma be better in the long run for the motor as it doesn't have top work as hard, is about the same gas wise and I don't think the weight differential is much. More expensive  but I think a better deal in the long run and the resale if desired may be better as it may appeal to more folks..

    1. Never Ends

      Never Ends

      thank you, i was thinking maybe a merc.. buying an outboard is one of the most complicated decisions. I appreciate the feedback as it is so tempting to go with the best deals available (tohatsu)

  8. I think you are right.
  9. At one point I had over 300 Suttons from the early eighties of all different types and weights and the only problem I had was occasionally I would forget to dry one off and just throw it in the box or perhaps leave it out in the boat somewhere and it would get a tarnish spot or two on it most of which (but not all) came off with the silver polish and a soft cloth. Those spoons also had a thin lacquer film or coating on them which helped protect the silver....I wonder if they stopped using it on the new ones and that is accentuating the problem with the plating especially if it is too thin a plating.
  10. I've had one for several years now and it can be useful but in no way is it a substitute or cheaper "alternative" to the Fishawk full size unit. For starters it doesn't measure the temp in "real time" like the larger units You basically send it down either on your line or on a downrigger and it measures the temps at 5 ft intervals and then you retrieve it and look at the temperature profile and it is often used to find the thermocline starting point for your trolling. It also can be used on your line to find what (approximate) depth your lure is running at and the temperature there. It can be a useful instrument but it is quite limited in its use compared with a full sized unit that measures temperature, speed, and depth in real time as you troll. This method also detects changes in the thermocline layer as you go along which the TD does not.
  11. I'll do the same. I have the same heavy copper ones too. Thanks for the "heads up" and best of luck this season.
  12. A couple things come to mind to consider before the issue of HP. The type and specific placement of the bracket it will sit on will be important and this will relate also to the shaft length of the kicker (e.g. long vs. extra long 20 inch vs. about 25 inch usually). The 8 Hp should push the boat OK in normal conditions but it could be pretty marginal if real rough out there and would really be working hard on the engine .
  13. You'd have to go to the store to fully understand When they say "old school" they really mean it...the place is right out of the 40's and fifties Steelydan - I'll have to keep an eye on my new ones for that too. There have always been issues with the plating staining from water left on them when put away etc. but they have mostly responded to lightly using jewelers silver polish on them. Sounds as though they still may not have the plating situation ironed out yet...