Brian

Divers off the outriggers

31 posts in this topic

 
Holy shyt skipper that pick of you in operation looks WAY to scary for this guy. FleetTracker catches a shyt pile of fish, nobody can take that away from the man. From my point of view I'd say you need a well seasoned crew, or a well oiled partner to make this happen? I can honestly say that I would have a major cluster:::F going on, I little burp from the kicker motor on a breezy day.   LOL

...yeah Pap, I get where you are coming from on the burp and wind! Lol. I don't normally run that much tackle on a rough day, and in this case it was during the salmon slam tournament in week 1 of May. Three of us on board one was my friend Captain Mick (Get Hooked Sport Fishing) from Point Breeze, my good friend Tom Conine (the human auto pilot) at the helm.
Conditions were perfect that day, and we beat the crap out of the Lakers and a few nice kings as well. If I'm trying to relax, I cut down to usually less than 6 rods max. Tom is piloting, Mick is in the back, I hopped up on the forward casting deck and snapped the pic in between the laker bash. We needed both nets!
Fleet has the nice 18 foot Taco poles. Great looking rig as well, love the twins! Can't beat the walk around fish ability. Nice easy rig to work and play. 1487402025896.jpg


cent frum my notso smartphone

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Both you guys have sweet looking rigs and certainly know what to do with them :) I forgot to mention  that the lines on the poles of my outriggers are rigged with large ball bearing swivel snaps ((hundred plus test?) that I snap the Black outrigger releases into. This is so that if I ever need to replace the release or have problem with it I can just quickly snap in another one rather than undoing the line itself.

Edited by Sk8man

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Les I know you run outriggers also and as always shared your info with fellow LOU folks and I guess the rest of the world as anyone can lurk this site. I certainly do not want you to think I excluded you in any way, just FleetTracker floats the same water as I, and skipper posted a wicked picture of poetry in motion so to speak. When my dad was alive and used to go with I didn't mind getting told what I should of done. The reason I mentioned the burp of a kicker is, that happened to me with a 6 line spread. Motor coughed and I wasn't at the helm to fire the main up to continue foreward motion, and yup she spun around in a ring if that wasn't bad enough, I have this ass yelling at me about the amount of line I have out ect, ect. To the point I got so mad I asked if he has any money involved, I reminded him it's I who is losing a $10.00 bill plus everytime a lure is lost and a Spro swivels and line is lost its more $$$ out of MY pocket, and If he didn't calm down it's a long walk back to Henderson. Sometimes my family forgets I'm not the little pain in the ass kid, I'm 52 years old and still loves to fish, just as much if not more now that I'm older. Family can be wonderful as well as a pain in the ass. Most of the guys I know from growing up are older now, so the other guys I know as buddies have never done this type of fishing. I can't be doing everything. Sounds like maybe I should be looking into  a autopilot?? That way I can show green horns the ropes. My 12 year old daughters have more on the ball. :lol:

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Both you guys have sweet looking rigs and certainly know what to do with them I forgot to mention  that the lines on the poles of my outriggers are rigged with large ball bearing swivel snaps ((hundred plus test?) that I snap the Black outrigger releases into. This is so that if I ever need to replace the release or have problem with it I can just quickly snap in another one rather than undoing the line itself.

Les, that's a good point! The heavy ball bearing swivels are very useful in changing releases from one style to another. The halyard lines are permanently crimped with large sleeves and I add a dab of silicone sealant to the bitter end in the end of the sleeve to help keep the cord intact and offer some protection against a wear point. I am using paracord right now and it works alright, but want to try something different and am considering 1.8mm dyneema and maybe a double halyard. The dyneema cord comes in a few different colors so if I do use a double halyard I can identify which one I'm pulling with color ID. I could be asking for trouble with 2 lines on each pole for deep water, and I'm wondering actually what to run that way. I'm thinking early season brown fishing in the shallows and fishing flat lines at different length similar to staggered sets on the big boards might be the best.
Also to keep the halyard from creeping back to the boat is having an adjustable Bungee that can clip into the halyard roller lead with a carabiner lock ring. The adjustable bungee will allow the halyard roller to be attached in multiple positions around the gunnel, or the hard top structure, and can be lengths adjusted to accommodate the right amount of tension on the halyard, and have easy access to the release so no one has to lean way out to reach the release and clip the line in. Getting the tension just right so you can run the halyard out and back easily and the release will stay at the end of the outriggers without creeping back under rod tension. I use an adjustable tarp bungee with the ball on one end and the adjustable hook and lock on the other. The carabiner clip of the halyard roller snaps around the Bungee and jams against the ball end. The other end can hook into loops or around structure and hook itself in some cases. More tarp Bungee can be added, if for some reason you need more length to achieve the hook up position and the desired tension on the halyard.
I might look into the 18 foot poles for more separation with the double halyard idea. I know it doesn't seem like much to gain 3 feet on a pole, but it works out to another 6 feet of spread across the width. Right now with 15 ft mine are tip to tip 35 feet apart with 5 feet separation of the mounts on the hard top. 6 more feet would be 41 feet! Almost twice the length of the 24 ft boat! Hmmmm?
Here's a trick I yet have to try..
A system that allows the line release to ride automatically up and down the halyard without having to pull the halyard at all. A heavy, smoothly finished, egg weight that has the halyard pass through it. The egg weight would have a free hanging tag line attached to it with the release on the free end of the tag line.
I think this might work well with the outriggers angled up and back a bit like I usually run them so line drag can work as a force to move the egg weight and release against gravity up to the end of the rigger.
The process would be to attach a fishing line to a release on the tag line, and the drag will pull the egg weight, sliding up the halyard and holding it there with forward line drag tension. The tag line could also help reduce some of the angle of the fishing line and facilitate a better hook up..maybe. After the release, the egg weight falls back down the halyard under gravitational pull of the earth, and sits there waiting for you to hook the line back in the tag line release!...no hauling the halyard!...maybe. What do you think?..maybe the tag line will whip around on a strike and tangle on the end of the outriggers...that could be a PITA!...maybe.....

cent frum my notso smartphone

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Hey Mark I ran my 15 footers from my 13 ft Whaler for years (about 22yrs.) so each one was actually longer than the boat by a couple feet:lol:

I've also used the bungi approach at the boat end to secure the halyards (the paracord lines) to the outrigger holders and if more tension was needed lengthwise I just tied a knot in them for more tension.  I think after your decription of the alternate method of retrieval of the halyard lines I'll stick with pulling them in by hand....I neede the exercise:lol:  Since my outriggers are mounted to the gunwales they ride a lot closer to the water than a hard top mounted set. There are some advantages in terms of more easily keeping your lines  and lures deeper with less fuss but maybe not as great in real rough water  with tipping of the boat in waves. Each mounting strategy has its strengths and weaknesses but all in all after using big boards, inlines and everyhting else under the sun (yellowbirds, kite rigs, balloon rigs etc.)  I still prefer the outriggers in many situations although I use inlines a lot too. As for the outrigger and dipsey use I mainly use them with small dipseys or regular size at most (not my 124 mm Walker DeepDivers) and relatively short lead set on 0 or 1 and then run some inlines outside them and that way if fish comes on the boards they just go across and back and don't hang up on the dipseys. I run my downriggers at a 45 degree angle on the inside of the outriggers and usually with sliders on each.The outriggers work great for long toplines run way back too in the Spring for browns .when I may or may not feel like messing with the boards. Just another option in the arsenal really.

Edited by Sk8man

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Scotty releases will hold anything in any condition and will not harm your line. To hold braid wrap a rubber band round braid then put it in release.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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