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TrophySeeker

Oneida week of May 15

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Heading to Oneida next week Sunday afternoon through Thursday morning. Staying near Cleveland Bar. Haven't fished Oneida in many years. Not looking for your secrets, but any general advice would be appreciated. I prefer not to troll as main presentation. I am stocked up on blade baits and bucktail jigs, as well as crawler harnesses, etc.

 

Appreciate any info.

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Lake Ontario United mobile app

 

 

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My suggestion would be to jig bucktails or blade baits anyway.

There are always some eyes right off of the Drop offs there.

Shackleton Shoals is probably your best bet though.


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I tip mine with a piece of worm about an inch long. Sometimes I don't tip them if the gobies are bad.


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On ‎5‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 9:58 PM, TrophySeeker said:

 

Heading to Oneida next week Sunday afternoon through Thursday morning. Staying near Cleveland Bar. Haven't fished Oneida in many years. Not looking for your secrets, but any general advice would be appreciated. I prefer not to troll as main presentation. I am stocked up on blade baits and bucktail jigs, as well as crawler harnesses, etc.

 

Appreciate any info.

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Lake Ontario United mobile app

 

 

 

I saw this post and thought it might help

Oneida Lake

Walleye season opened on Saturday, May 6th. Anglers who braved the rain and wind did manage to get some walleye both in shallow and deep water. With round gobies now abundant in the lake, it may require some adjustment in the way anglers fish for walleye. The same thing was required when zebra mussels become established in the lake and the water went from turbid to clear, fishing methods needed to be changed to match the conditions. Gobies are very bottom oriented fish so sometimes just getting a foot or two off bottom will help to avoid some of them. If using worm harnesses try trolling instead of drifting, the faster speed keeps them higher off bottom and also helps to avoid some of the gobies. Using artificial lures instead of live bait can also help. Walleye tend to be "well fed" in goby waters and can be difficult to catch; full fish are generally harder to catch than hungry fish. Sometimes going for reaction bites can help, fish hit out of reflex instead of hunger. This can be accomplished by giving erratic action to your lures by speeding them out, slowing them down, stopping them briefly, giving short quick jerks with the rod, etc.

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Struggling... 1 walleye since Sunday night. That was drifting in North bay. Today all I could get there was silver bass. Can't get anything going at Shackleton. Have not had a bite on a crawler since 5am. I don't believe I have had a gobie bite yet.

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The gobies are not really an issue yet. I don't find any gobies in their stomachs.

Plus Gobies are not very active in cold/cool water. They will get going soon though.

Check your messages Trophyseeker.


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On ‎5‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 8:23 AM, Cletus said:

I saw this post and thought it might help

Oneida Lake

Walleye season opened on Saturday, May 6th. Anglers who braved the rain and wind did manage to get some walleye both in shallow and deep water. With round gobies now abundant in the lake, it may require some adjustment in the way anglers fish for walleye. The same thing was required when zebra mussels become established in the lake and the water went from turbid to clear, fishing methods needed to be changed to match the conditions. Gobies are very bottom oriented fish so sometimes just getting a foot or two off bottom will help to avoid some of them. If using worm harnesses try trolling instead of drifting, the faster speed keeps them higher off bottom and also helps to avoid some of the gobies. Using artificial lures instead of live bait can also help. Walleye tend to be "well fed" in goby waters and can be difficult to catch; full fish are generally harder to catch than hungry fish. Sometimes going for reaction bites can help, fish hit out of reflex instead of hunger. This can be accomplished by giving erratic action to your lures by speeding them out, slowing them down, stopping them briefly, giving short quick jerks with the rod, etc.

This is great advice. Last season and so far this season dragging harnesses hasn't been working like before. I know guys that only do that and they've had a tough time. The reaction bite is still on.

 

And I agree with reeleyz that the gobies aren't showing up in walleye bellies much yet but the bite has definitely been different since last year for whatever reason.

 

The good news is that the eyes this year are already healthy, not drawn out at all from the spawn. From what I've seen they've been gorging themselves on perch fry.

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glad to hear the gobies aren't showing up much yet, last fall they were everywhere and couldn't keep them off my jigs along with the shad getting snagged on every retrieve.  I like catching bigger eyes out of my other spots but I hope the gobies don't change the taste of the Oneida eyes.

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