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Maybe the last guy that stepped on the fish had dirty cleats on? 

 

Without pathology work, I think the word is "lesion."  

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Posted (edited)

It still could be a lamprey Mike.The very precise outer edge of the red area suggests it. They suck the heck out of them.

Edited by Sk8man

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The NYS DEC  suggests that you DISCARD any diseased fish "marked by tumors,,lesions,or other abnormal conditions of the skin, meat, or internal organs"..because the health implications of eating deformed or abnormal fish are unknown..

Do not release the fish, or eat the fish , is what they recommend.

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Well yeah... It became sea gull or coon food. Threw it in the woods. I don't even eat the ones that have lamprey marks that you can see their guts threw the hole...

Didn't someone say Pike are the last to get hit by lampreys? Probably why the trout fishing is so bad... Most the pike are covered in wounds that go straight threw to the main chest cavity...

Sent from my Moto E (4) using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Posted (edited)

Those lamprey give me the creeps...we have giant lampreys that come up and lay eggs here on the Delaware...nasty.

 

I have caught quite a few walleyes on Oneida that have warts and tumors on them...2 in one day once. I put them in a bag on my boat, regardless of their size, and they go in the dumpster when I get home. At least DEC does not count those legal size fish with tumors and warts as part of your daily limit.

 

Edited by choo-choo

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Any large fish from Seneca that has lesions is most likely caused by lampreys.  Perhaps an open wound caused by a lamprey can get infected and cause a growth to start?  I agree with not eating fish that you have any doubts about.  I however don't think I agree with killing and throwing the fish away unless you didn't notice it until too late.  If the fish has something wrong (especially just a lamprey lesion) there is likely no reason to think it couldn't produce normal offspring. 

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Why throw an infected fish back... That makes no sense... So they can spawn with other fish and infect them too? Possible it could be something that grew after bitten but doubtful. I thought about cutting it off and seeing if it had any parasite inside but you know what... DEC didn't care before... Why waste my time asking them? Maybe someone on here knew or knew someone that knew what it was...

I like to fish so naturally I am interested in knowing what caused the issue.

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Certainly not anything personal towards you FishingTheFL.  I just think in most cases if the fish seems otherwise healthy it is probably better to let it go.  Nature and evolution has a way to work these things out on its own.  If a fish is not healthy and adapted to produce healthy offspring then it usually won't be able to.   Species that aren't fit/adapted to survive simply don't make it especially in a competitive environment like a lake ecosystem.  Like I stated earlier, Seneca Lake has a huge lamprey problem right now.  If I took the DECs recommendation then I would be burying every trout I catch and I don't think that would be a good thing.

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We used to catch walleyes in the Susquehanna in Endicott, with the warty looking nodules on their sides, a DEC biologist told me they are a fluke, a parasite similar to the one that causes the black spots in a lot of bass and panfish, and they are harmless, you just cut them out when cleaning the fish. 

 

I have  wonder if you have been told that that bag of fish with what you identify as tumors are OK to keep,s regardless of size and number, by an ECO? 

 

All parasites:

 

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lymphosarcoma_b.jpg

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I have checked with the DEC. Albany and Stamford NY

. They suggest discarding any fish with tumors , warts , lesions  or abnormal conditions of the fish's skin, meat or internal organs.

Also on page 70 of the 2017/2018 NYS Freshwater Fishing Regulations.

 

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