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idn713

laker help

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Hey guys I just wanted some info on how to ice lakers on either canadice or hemlock. Basically I just want to know if you can fish the lake trout with out all the fancy equipment. I don't have a vexilar unit and I don't have special jigging rods. I realize you need heavier gear so I figured I would spool up the rods I have and grab some tubes and swedish pimples. my plan would to be to drill a hole jig it up and down the water column for around 20 minutes and if nothing is home keep moving. what would you guys recommend for putting the lakers on the ice?

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idn,

As far as I know, very few people venture out onto the ice of Hemlock and Canadice lakes. Many believe that the ice is not safe, as the ice does not form properly due to the great mean depth of the lake.

Thucydides

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:D:D:D yeah, they don't freeze up...

Lakers are obviously very popular at these lakes. If you want to try jigging, just go out from the state boat launch on Canadice a couple hundred yards and give it a shot. Make sure that you spud your way out, but generally in February once the water gets hard they're good to go. Snow can really make a mess out of Canadice, though.

I'd use 10 lb test Powerpro with an 8 lb test fluorocarbon leader. Try jigging rapalas, larger pimples, and buckshot rattle spoons. It's not the fastest fishing in the world, but you have a shot at least. I've heard interesting things about the smelt in these lakes over the past couple of years. Might be worth hitting the smelt early then spending an hour jigging lakers just after sunrise.

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The one thing I would add to Gators' advise is to go to the CAnoe launch area on the NE side of Canadice real early, use tiny jigs with a mousie and catch some smelt for tip up bait. You should easily get the smelt in 20-30' of water. You can probably walk out from there, set up you tipups an do the jigging thing. Also, keep an ear open for ice conditions at Keuka lake. Lots of lakers there, but you will need a good hard freeze to be safe.

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I fish these lakes alot for lakers and a flasher will really be necessary. I used to catch a few before but now they are easy to catch. Sometimes they want a wiggle and stop, sometimes its a big sweeping jigging pattern and sometimes u get there close and reel like crazy 20' off bottom and stop then they slam it. You really need to see what gets them in then what it takes to get a bite. These lakes are loaded with lakers if you cant catch several every time out its operater error change what you are doing

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It does seem like the lakers in most of the Finger Lakes have gotten easier to catch over the past years...I know that I sure as heck haven't become that much better of a fisherman :D

I grew up in Bath, and we trolled Keuka a fair bit when I was a kid. A good day was a couple of fish. Now, a good day is a couple dozen fish. Of course, they're typically cookie cutters, but still...I wonder if the increased water clarity has something to do with it?

Ok, now all we need is ice. Fingers crossed.

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