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I’m heading to St Lawrence River in October.  Any recommendations for a flatlining rig?  I was thinking 40# braid (10lb mono diameter) so I can get the lures deeper. Is this going to be strong enough?  Leader recommendations etc... would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks, have a great week everyone.  

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On the St-lawrence I run 80 lb braid to a 130 lb fluoro leader.  I'm sure some have differing opinions but I wouldn't run anything lighter you stand the chance of losing the next world record

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Agreed.  Wouldn't go lower than 80lb braid.  The lures themselves do a number on your equipment and will really wear on your knots, etc.  I'd suggest 174# single strand steel or 130-175# fluorocarbon for trolling leaders.

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Light is just not the way to go with muskies. Especially not in the SLR. That would be gambling on the life of a valuable musky that is important for the long term sustainability of a world class trophy fishery. Not to mention, albeit much less important, you loosing the chance of catching a fish of a lifetime. The minimum the main line should be is 80# (some would say 100#). Leader should be at least double that in single strand steel, maybe more in Floro. Use Stringease Stay-Lok snaps and high quality crane swivels or ball bearing swivels. The muskies there are known to fight harder than anywhere else and with all the rocky structure there, it is important to not go too light on tackle and keep it in top condition.

 

Everyone has a different opinion and may have had different experiences that shape that opinion, including specific brands of tackle. You might want to join us at the next meeting of Muskies Inc. Chapter 69 at the Henrietta Moose Lodge Monday Sept. 17th at 7pm. That is if you are close enough and have the time. There will probably be 1 to 5 members in attendance who have considerable SLR experience and can give you suggestions on many your tackle questions. You may also meet a few new fishing buddies.

 

Is that a Joe Bonamassa replica guitar you are playing?

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Thanks much for all the great advice.   I will definitely go /w heavier line.  

    It’s a Buckethead mini guitar replica btw!

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Posted (edited)

I run #80 cortland spectron with #130 floro 5-7'leaders stay loc snaps#6or#7. Jmo

I know many in ca  use #100

sol

Edited by solgrande

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I used to flat line troll for pike and walleyes. The accepted term basically meant to troll a shallow running bait  (i.e.: floating Rapala's which come in wide variety of size, note up to 7"+). The term flatlining basically meant to troll a shallow running bait a good ways behind the boat (hence flat lining). Why would you troll at - near the surface during the dog-days. Unless perhaps your fishing after dark. 

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Some of my biggest tigers have come only down 10 feet or so over 65 fow in 80plus temps middle of the hottest day of the year.... sometimes we fish topwater over deep water too...you would be surprised how often you can trigger a deep fish with a shallow presentation when they won't hit a deep one.

Sent from my E6810 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Posted (edited)

Happened to get a couple of good pike casting Thursday after getting skunked trolling. The fish marks and bait balls spotted while trolling were down (17 to 30) feet. Conesus is a bit of a pain to troll in summer due to floating weeds that ride the line down to bait - leader. Don't do enough to go back to downriggers, etc. Thermocline is presently at  30+'

We trolled for decades. If using deep running baits, downriggers, etc we didn’t refer to this as flatline trolling. I came to understand flatline trolling as long lining, shallow running baits while trolling. Hence the term flat, not vertical. 

Edited by NPike

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Two good ways to defeat floating weeds trolling are

First when flatlining put your rod tips right in the water. Weeds collect on rod tips and don't slide down

Second way is to put a clip weight on just 20 feet back from your boards. Weeds will eventually get to heavy to troll but keeps your lure clean and diving to the intended depth. As far as weeds collecting on boards you get good at flipping them

Sent from my E6810 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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