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wishinfishin

What to run on copper opinions

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11 inch paddle with meat.  It beats going to the gym

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I run flashers and flies or meat on coppers. Treat them as big fish rigs or you will kill tons of small fish.


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Pick a starting point.... say meat and if you cant generate some strikes after a couple of color changes, by all means, go to a spoon or Fly n flasher.  What gives you confidence is the best thing to run, just don't run it all day with no strikes that stubbornness. 

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I run flashers and flies or meat on coppers. Treat them as big fish rigs or you will kill tons of small fish.


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Interesting Gambler! Do you think you are more apt to catch the smaller Kings on a spoon, than you will on a flasher/fly, or meat rig? I assume this is what you are saying. And I assume the reason it will result in killing the small ones is because of the long fight, or dragging them without knowing. Is this correct? Thanks.

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I find more often skippies and small kings will hit a spoon over a flasher and fly.  I don't want to injure fish of the future and I don't want to waste time reeling in small fish on long coppers.  I have dragged small fish around on coppers and found dead fish on the end of the line after a hour. 

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47 minutes ago, GAMBLER said:

I find more often skippies and small kings will hit a spoon over a flasher and fly.  I don't want to injure fish of the future and I don't want to waste time reeling in small fish on long coppers.  I have dragged small fish around on coppers and found dead fish on the end of the line after a hour. 

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I find more often skippies and small kings will hit a spoon over a flasher and fly.  I don't want to injure fish of the future and I don't want to waste time reeling in small fish on long coppers.  I have dragged small fish around on coppers and found dead fish on the end of the line after a hour. 
Thanks. Good to know.

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I'll be the one to disagree with this one. A big flasher/meat rig in NO WAY guarantees a "big fish".
In fact, I think more small fish are killed or injured on meat rigs on long coppers than anything. They simply can't resist meat---anywhere you put it.
This year, especially, it seems the smaller fish are more attracted to meat than the bigger fish. Meat catches big fish but it also catches just as many small ones but kills more of them because of the nature of the rig.

Want to stop killing "small fish"? Stop running long coppers and deep riggers that don't quickly telegraph a bite.

Small fish getting killed by accident is something that happens. The rig has nothing to do with it.
Btw......some of my biggest kings this year have come on spoons---SMALL SPOONS!






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I think the key here is "long" coppers. It is the length of time bringing in the fish  say on a 600 copper that is critical. I don't use anything longer than 300 and add weight if needed. 100 yds (length of a football field) is a long way behind the boat just for the wire alone.

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I think the key here is "long" coppers. It is the length of time bringing in the fish  say on a 600 copper that is critical. I don't use anything longer than 300 and add weight if needed. 100 yds (length of a football field) is a long way behind the boat just for the wire alone.



If you're "fun fishing" you shouldn't be fishing any copper. They're definitely not "fun" and they kill everything that they catch.


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Thanks for the input guys.
My longest copper is 300 and do what Les does which is add weight if necessary.
But yes sometimes skippeys fall victim. Same with down riggers in my minimal experience, meaning if I set the release to light bigger fish hit it and don't get stuck hard and have time during slack line to shake the hook. Too hard skippeys don't fire. So I find a happy place in the release and pay close attention to rod tip action.
Part of this post was I wondered if say a big paddle and meat was to much resistance to get down to where you "think" you are depth wise versus just a magnum spoon or smaller 8" flasher with fly or spoon.

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4 hours ago, Sk8man said:

I think the key here is "long" coppers. It is the length of time bringing in the fish  say on a 600 copper that is critical. I don't use anything longer than 300 and add weight if needed. 100 yds (length of a football field) is a long way behind the boat just for the wire alone.

if you don't mind me asking how and ware do you add weight? Thanks.

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Most of the time I add it right at the connection of the fluoro leader but I sometimes run it at the connection of the backing and copper depending on what I'm running. If I am running heavier stuff at the end I use the former and for sticks etc. I use the latter most often. After awhile you can tell by the feel of the rod and tip which point seems better for  that particular setup.

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Most of the time I add it right at the connection of the fluoro leader but I sometimes run it at the connection of the backing and copper depending on what I'm running. If I am running heavier stuff at the end I use the former and for sticks etc. I use the latter most often. After awhile you can tell by the feel of the rod and tip which point seems better for  that particular setup.

That makes sense Thanks. And are you using a OR12 and what size weight?


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I do use the offshores and others as well. Commonly use 4 oz but depends on what I'm running and the water conditions and water depth.

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