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Perhaps it's a wreck from the War of 1812? From "History of the Great Lakes"

 

Events on the Niagara Frontier

 

When the storm had subsided, preparations were made for a second attempt to invade the enemy's country. The river was narrow, and every open movement on one side was visible on the other. Lieut.-Colonel Chrystie with 350 men, regular soldiers, arrived at Four-mile creek late on the evening of the 10th, and hastened to headquarters, offering the services of himself and his men; but as the boats could not carry over more than had been selected to go, Colonel Chrystie was detained at Four-mile creek. There was also a strong force at Fort Niagara, all of which tended to deceive the British general as to where the attack would be made.

 

Maybe it's an uncharted shipwreck from the War of 1812 standing straight up?

 

http://www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/GreatLakes/Documents/HGL/default.asp?ID=c011

Edited by Thun

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If somebody is willing to take me to the spot, Ill bring my scuba gear and drop down!  Who knows, maybe will retrieve a tone of spoons, spindoctors, dipsys, and flys!!!

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Good time to remind all of us to check the drag on our downriggers.Could be catastrophic if they are dialed too tight.I remember reading this happening to a guy and it pulled the the stern down below water level in a matter of seconds.

As far as the drag setting on the riggers goes, how loose should it be? I have found if I set it so it slips some then it wont pull the ball up and slips reeling in. Someone said the drag should be like a fishing reel. Any advise?

 

BTW that snag story is crazy. Too bad you didnt have an underwater camera onboard but who wants to snag that too.

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The canadians had a weather buoy out off the niagara fence area.  Supposedly it is not there anymore and I never did hear what happened to it.  Not sure if it was lost or they decommissioned it.

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I got spooled right in that area 2 years ago in the fall.... i figured it was the biggest king I ever had on the line, or it was a Russian Sub.  Maybe door #3 was your snag.  If Jigstick scuba dives it, grab my Mtn. Dew Spin Dr. while you're down there!

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My guess is that this is an old channel marker which probably was off of the Niagara River some time ago and was dragged by the ice to this location.   I have seen this before.   

 

There are only a few shipwrecks that we have located in Lake Ontario that still have the mast still standing.  We have found large trees and several high pinnacles of rock in some locations that protrude off the bottom that can cause a snag.

 

If anyone is curious about a snag you can email ( [email protected]) me the location and I can check out our side scan records for that area of the lake or go and check it out if we have not covered that area.   See www.shipwreckwold.com for our shipwreck discoveries off of the southern shore of Lake Ontario.   Cheers, Jim

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Here is the coordinates I have marked on my graph for the snag. N43*20.252, W78*59.453. I was trolling west at the time and it took a few seconds to hit the waypoint. I would say the snag would be a couple hundred feet east of this.

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How many spin doctors and atomik flies do you think are wrapped up around this legendary snag?

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The masts of a warship were more lofty than those of a merchant ship of the same tonnage. In sailing merchant ships, the masts became more lofty with time. A merchant ship of 1300 tons, in 1830, had a mainmast 179 ft. in height; a vessel of the same size would have a mast of 198 ft. by the end of the 19th century

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/sail-masts.htm

 

Just found this!

 

 

We were trollin the bar last week about a half mile east of four mile. We were in 206 FOW when my port rigger, down 55' grabbed something. The swivel mount broke the lock pin with the impact. Boat to nuetral. After cleaning up spread, we were anchored. I was able to work my weight up to 16', then , no more. I let it back out and swung the boom hard left to right. It popped right out. Ive hooked large submerged wood in the past. This was like an anchor line. Any ideas?

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Dodger,

 

I put them in my gps as a stop sign to avoid it.  We were out for the pro am and just stayed away from that area.  Didn't want to chance losing a probe.  Thanks for posting coordinates, I'm sure its going to save a lot of tackle.  Sorry to see you guys got knocked out of 1st for the derby, guess the fish gods want to see you back out there next year! 

 

 

Jeff

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I snagged something with a dipsey about 4-5 miles west of wilson in roughly 200' fow or so back in May. Fortunately I only lost the fly. Glad it wasnt a rigger that snagged!

For a number of seconds i thought i had the derby winner on! oh well.

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Is this hazard still causing problems?  Word is the fishing is hot 160-225fow. Right where this thing is

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