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So those deeper in the the know with the DEC and a better understanding of the bait fish situation , I am looking at you Jerry Felluca and friends, when should we be starting to get worried with the prolonged nasty cold snap?

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Most of the lake is still 44 degrees.  The problem comes in the spring when winter hangs on too long.

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Our intake temp at work is the lowest I have ever seen it in December.  It is currently 34 degrees.  Last year at this time it was 40 degrees and only went down to 37 degrees at it's lowest point.  The two horrible winters, the lowest we got was 33 and that was for only two weeks. 

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My take on alewife winter kills is areas of low depleted dissolved oxygen  water up well due to offshore winds and the alewife perish. 

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Starvation stress allow diseases to kill it’s host. 

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11 hours ago, GAMBLER said:

Our intake temp at work is the lowest I have ever seen it in December.  It is currently 34 degrees.  Last year at this time it was 40 degrees and only went down to 37 degrees at it's lowest point.  The two horrible winters, the lowest we got was 33 and that was for only two weeks. 

 

If this weather doesn't take a drastically warm turn soon, it might be worse than those last 2 back to back bad winters.

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No matter how cold it gets, there will always be 39° water somewhere. That is the coldest the warmer water will get. Might not be optimal but a large population will survive. 

 

If the depths of the lake get colder than 39°, we won't be worrying about alewives!

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  The problem at 39 degrees water is decay of biologic dead material consumes the dissolved oxygen on the bottom during long ice periods with low stream flows, lack of surface wave action and snow cover on the ice preventing sun light to penetrate to have photosynthesis producing oxygen in the water.  Fish in order to survive suspend in slightly higher oxygen areas but their metabolism is slowed and things do get better when rainfall and snow melt bring fresh dissolved oxygen to the lake's waters.    

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I also wonder what effect the prolonged warm this fall and early winter will have on the survival. Man if we can just have a decent hatch this year we will be good for a few years, especially with the massive yoy class from last year


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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I also wonder what effect the prolonged warm this fall and early winter will have on the survival. Man if we can just have a decent hatch this year we will be good for a few years, especially with the massive yoy class from last year


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

Our intake temp was warmer into December than the year before. Last years was the warmest I could find in our records in the last ten years. If spring comes on time or early, I think we will be fine.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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