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Mosestron

Trib fisher just starting out.

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Hey All,

 

I'm fairly new to fishing, at least doing it well...
I have young kids at home, so I typically don't get to fish more than once a month, and I wanted to see what I can do while I'm not fishing to improve my chances.
I went and fished some of the tribs in Niagara county yesterday and really enjoyed it. Water was really muddy and fast, but at least I was fishing.

 

So, a few questions. I was reading here last night and hearing about some angst against trib fishers, So what can I do to make sure I am one of the good ones?

Then, any tips for a angler just starting out? I'm used to fishing ponds ,not streams and would love any help.

I don't have a boat, since when I started fishing I got wife approval on the condition that I wouldn't get a boat.  :)

Thanks,

M

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Welcome to the site. I’ve been at it for a little while, but am no expert by any means!!! I have a cottage on the east end and fish as much as possible with 2 little ones. Fish both big lake and tribs. Also, moved to the Hudson valley years ago and fly fish for wild rainbows and browns in the Catskills.

As far as the tribs go, *I feel*, that the Googans that show up (from all over) for the run and subsequent early steelhead are more to blame for the feeling about fishing in the tribs. If stream fishing is what you got, then fish on buddy!!!

This site has tons of great people and they are willing to help and share info. Try to be specific about your questions and what you’re looking for. What kind of tackle are you using? Spinning, fly gear, pin? Float fishing, bottom bouncing, lures? Honestly, it’s all crazy and can keeps me up at night!

As far as what to do in between trips, practice tying knots and getting your rigs ready. Can’t catch em without line in the water! It’ll speed you up and save a little frustration when on the water.

Lastly, look into local streams that are stocked or hold wild fish. I’ve found that working flowing water in the Catskills has definitely helped me manage what I do on bigger systems of the lake. I look at it as practice for the “big time”

Good luck, tight lines!




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I use spinning reels, with lures. And I like to have 2-3 poles with me to try other lures or worms. 
 

 

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Lures are limited in LO tribs for much of the year, must have a free swinging single point hook, except a 1/8 or less oz jig, or a floating lure.  You are best to Study the regulations guide to become familiar with what is kosher and not kosher, and when.  Probably the easiest way to start is with a spinning rod and float, distance between the float and bait determined by the approximate depth of the run you choose to fish, and salmon eggs or artificial bait, like yarn or plastics, or beads, and enough shot to sink them to the depth allowed by the float.

 

Try these links for more info.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/62202.html

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/37926.html

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Where do you see the regulations on the lures?

i went through the links and didn’t see anything on lures. 
 

i did find one which covers seasons but nothing on lures. 

 

i recently got some trout magnet lures, but they have 2 treble hooks.

 

12 mile creek in Wilson  is primarily where I will be fishing, (not sure if this is allowed or not) are those same Regs in place there? 

 

With the assumption that I can’t use the lures, I figure a hook worm sinker and Bobber are my best bet? 

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You might want to check the free DEC syllabus (guide) that most sports shops, Walmart etc. carry. It contains most information and even a diagram regarding setups allowed and prohibited.

Edited by Sk8man

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I’ll second Lucky in saying that float fishing is probably your best bet. Do a search for float fishing (or centerpin rigging, not that you need a pin to do it). Or PM me and I’ll try to help as much as I can.

I started float fishing (centerpinning specifically) a few years back and even use it in the Catskills. It’s a dynamite way to present your terminal tackle.


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DEC to Feature New Angler Outreach Programs at 2020 Greater Niagara Fishing and Outdoor Expo Jan. 17 - 19

Biologists to Host Open House and Present Updates on Status of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario Fisheries

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) invites the public to check out its Bureau of Fisheries' expanded angler outreach programs at the upcoming Greater Niagara Fishing and Outdoor Expo, Jan. 17 to 19, at the Niagara Falls Conference and Event Center.

"DEC is pleased to increase our outreach efforts at this year's Niagara Fishing and Outdoor Expo," said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos. "This event provides an excellent opportunity for anglers to interact directly with the biologists who study and manage our Great Lakes and inland fisheries, and to talk one-on-one with fisheries managers about a variety of topics. New York offers numerous world-class fishing opportunities, and we invite anyone interested to come and learn more about the incredible sportfishing in New York's Great Lakes region and beyond."

Freshwater fishing in New York State is thriving and generates significant economic benefits to local economies. In 2017, anglers fished more than 3.1 million days on New York's open Great Lakes waters, and an additional 850,000 days on Great Lakes tributaries. The combined economic impact exceeded $152 million in angler expenditures en route to and at fishing destinations. Anglers fished more than 1.3 million days on the Finger Lakes in 2017, generating a combined $29.9 million in expenditures.

In addition to its annual informational booth at the event, DEC will host abbreviated versions of the fisheries "State of the Lake" meetings for Lake Erie and Lake Ontario that are typically held in March and May. Meetings will feature emerging results about walleye movement, creel survey results, habitat work, prey base, and record catch rates. Key members of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario fisheries management and research community will present information on management and assessment activities for prominent lake and tributary sport fisheries. Meeting times are:

  • State of Lake Ontario Fisheries meeting - Friday, Jan. 17, 6 to 7 p.m.
  • State of Lake Erie Fisheries meeting - Friday, Jan. 17, 7 to 8 p.m.

Billed as a top attraction at this year's expo, DEC will host a unique "Open House" program on Saturday, Jan. 18, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., during which expo attendees can talk one-on-one with subject matter experts on a variety of the State's fisheries management topics, including:

  • Lake Ontario - open lake;
  • Lake Ontario tributaries and Salmon River;
  • Lake Erie and tributaries;
  • Niagara River;
  • St. Lawrence River;
  • Great Lakes fish production and stocking;
  • Finger Lakes;
  • Recruiting more women to fishing;
  • Trout stream management; and
  • Environmental Law Enforcement.

To learn more about this event, visit the Niagara Fishing Expo website.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html

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Since you are already at the west end, you might learn a LOT Saturday from 11 to 2 from DEC or anytime from other presenters at the above function.

 

As to Lures in the tributaries which include ALL streams (yes, even Cowsucker Creek!:lol:) that flow to Lake Ontario upstream to the first barrier impassable by fish (and not all streams have them).  As Sk8man says, read the little book you got when you bought your license ( you did buy a license, I hope!).  This is from the website regulations guide (http://www.eregulations.com/newyork/fishing/special-regulations-great-lakes-tributaries/)

Lake Ontario tributary seasonal fishing regulations

Seasonal fishing regulations apply September 1 to March 31.

Fishing hours

Fishing from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise is prohibited except in the Black River (Jefferson County) from Lake Ontario upstream to the Route 180 bridge in Dexter, where fishing is permitted at all times.

Hook, leader and weight regulations

Hooks:

  • Only one hook with a single hook point is permitted, except as outlined below for floating lures and artificial flies.
  • Hooks attached to any lure must be free-swinging, except on an artificial fly (see Definitions).
  • An artificial fly (Definitions) can only have a single hook with no more than two hook points. Tandem artificial flies are not permitted.
  • The gap between a hook’s shaft and point cannot exceed one-half inch.
  • Use of hooks with added weight is prohibited, except artificial flies (Definitions) and jigs weighing no more than one-eighth ounce.

Floating lures:

  • A floating lure is a lure that floats at rest in water with or without any weight attached to the lure, leader or line.
  • Can have multiple treble hooks.
  • Any hooks on a floating lure must be attached to the lure by a ring or swivel except for artificial flies.
  • The distance between the body of a floating lure and the points of any attached hooks shall not exceed one and one-half inches.

Leaders and weights:

  • The distance between the hook, artificial fly or lure and any weight attached to the line or leader, whether fixed or sliding, shall not exceed four feet.
  • Any weight added to the line, leader, swivels, artificial fly or lure shall not hang lower than the hook when the line or leader is held vertically.
Lower Niagara River regulations can be found on Great Lakes & Tributary Regulations. Salmon River regulations can be found on below.

Lake Ontario Waters and Tributaries Exempted from Seasonal Tributary Regulations

The following regulations apply except those listed in the table below:

Water

County

Applicable Regulations

Niagara River

Erie & Niagara

Upper Niagara River or Lower Niagara River regulations apply

Round Pond, Buck Pond, Long Pond, Cranberry Pond, and Irondequoit Bay

Monroe

Lake Ontario regulations apply

Sodus Bay

Wayne

Lake Ontario regulations apply

South Sandy Pond

Oswego

Lake Ontario regulations apply

Sections of Lake Ontario Tributaries Subject to Seasonal (Sept. 1 to Mar. 31) Regulations

The following tributary sections are subject to seasonal fishing regulations
described below during the period September 1 to March 31:

Water

County

Portion of Tributary Subject to Special Regulations

Eighteenmile Creek

Niagara

From the Route 18 bridge upstream to Burt Dam

Oak Orchard Creek

Orleans

From the first power lines that are 1.9 miles upstream (south) of Route 18 bridge upstream to Waterport Dam

Genesee River

Monroe

From the State Route 104 Bridge upstream to the Lower Falls.

Sterling Creek

Cayuga

From Old State Road to impassable barrier upstream of Route 104A

Sterling Valley Creek

Cayuga

From McIntyre Road to impassable barrier upstream of Route 104A

Oswego River

Oswego

From the Utica Street bridge upstream to the Varick Dam

Catfish Creek

Oswego

From the mouth upstream to dam at County Route 1

Black River

Jefferson

From the upstream tip of the lowermost island to Mill Street dam in Watertown

All other tributaries

All

From the bridge closest to the mouth upstream to first barrier impassable by fish

 
 

Examples of Legal Seasonal Fishing Rigs

74.jpg

 

Edited by Lucky13

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Looks like Lucky saved ya some time and trouble:smile:

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How many floater rigs do you normally set up? 
also any tips on storing them? 
 

Why do they recommend using different line for the leader? 

17 hours ago, Lucky13 said:

Lures are limited in LO tribs for much of the year, must have a free swinging single point hook, except a 1/8 or less oz jig, or a floating lure.  You are best to Study the regulations guide to become familiar with what is kosher and not kosher, and when.  Probably the easiest way to start is with a spinning rod and float, distance between the float and bait determined by the approximate depth of the run you choose to fish, and salmon eggs or artificial bait, like yarn or plastics, or beads, and enough shot to sink them to the depth allowed by the float.

 

Try these links for more info.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/62202.html

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/37926.html

 

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1 hour ago, Lucky13 said:

Since you are already at the west end, you might learn a LOT Saturday from 11 to 2 from DEC or anytime from other presenters at the above function.

 

As to Lures in the tributaries which include ALL streams (yes, even Cowsucker Creek!:lol:) that flow to Lake Ontario upstream to the first barrier impassable by fish (and not all streams have them).  As Sk8man says, read the little book you got when you bought your license ( you did buy a license, I hope!).  This is from the website regulations guide (http://www.eregulations.com/newyork/fishing/special-regulations-great-lakes-tributaries/)

Lake Ontario tributary seasonal fishing regulations

Seasonal fishing regulations apply September 1 to March 31.

Fishing hours

Fishing from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise is prohibited except in the Black River (Jefferson County) from Lake Ontario upstream to the Route 180 bridge in Dexter, where fishing is permitted at all times.

Hook, leader and weight regulations

Hooks:

  • Only one hook with a single hook point is permitted, except as outlined below for floating lures and artificial flies.
  • Hooks attached to any lure must be free-swinging, except on an artificial fly (see Definitions).
  • An artificial fly (Definitions) can only have a single hook with no more than two hook points. Tandem artificial flies are not permitted.
  • The gap between a hook’s shaft and point cannot exceed one-half inch.
  • Use of hooks with added weight is prohibited, except artificial flies (Definitions) and jigs weighing no more than one-eighth ounce.

Floating lures:

  • A floating lure is a lure that floats at rest in water with or without any weight attached to the lure, leader or line.
  • Can have multiple treble hooks.
  • Any hooks on a floating lure must be attached to the lure by a ring or swivel except for artificial flies.
  • The distance between the body of a floating lure and the points of any attached hooks shall not exceed one and one-half inches.

Leaders and weights:

  • The distance between the hook, artificial fly or lure and any weight attached to the line or leader, whether fixed or sliding, shall not exceed four feet.
  • Any weight added to the line, leader, swivels, artificial fly or lure shall not hang lower than the hook when the line or leader is held vertically.
Lower Niagara River regulations can be found on Great Lakes & Tributary Regulations. Salmon River regulations can be found on below.

Lake Ontario Waters and Tributaries Exempted from Seasonal Tributary Regulations

The following regulations apply except those listed in the table below:

Water

County

Applicable Regulations

Niagara River

Erie & Niagara

Upper Niagara River or Lower Niagara River regulations apply

Round Pond, Buck Pond, Long Pond, Cranberry Pond, and Irondequoit Bay

Monroe

Lake Ontario regulations apply

Sodus Bay

Wayne

Lake Ontario regulations apply

South Sandy Pond

Oswego

Lake Ontario regulations apply

Sections of Lake Ontario Tributaries Subject to Seasonal (Sept. 1 to Mar. 31) Regulations

The following tributary sections are subject to seasonal fishing regulations
described below during the period September 1 to March 31:

Water

County

Portion of Tributary Subject to Special Regulations

Eighteenmile Creek

Niagara

From the Route 18 bridge upstream to Burt Dam

Oak Orchard Creek

Orleans

From the first power lines that are 1.9 miles upstream (south) of Route 18 bridge upstream to Waterport Dam

Genesee River

Monroe

From the State Route 104 Bridge upstream to the Lower Falls.

Sterling Creek

Cayuga

From Old State Road to impassable barrier upstream of Route 104A

Sterling Valley Creek

Cayuga

From McIntyre Road to impassable barrier upstream of Route 104A

Oswego River

Oswego

From the Utica Street bridge upstream to the Varick Dam

Catfish Creek

Oswego

From the mouth upstream to dam at County Route 1

Black River

Jefferson

From the upstream tip of the lowermost island to Mill Street dam in Watertown

All other tributaries

All

From the bridge closest to the mouth upstream to first barrier impassable by fish

 
 

Examples of Legal Seasonal Fishing Rigs

74.jpg

 


 

thank you very much!

 

i do have a license but bought it online, so I’ll have to download the pdf next time I get one. 
 

I looked up the float rig and will re rig my poles so that I’m in regulations for the next time I go out. 
 

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If you use the same lb test and no leader, and you break off, there is a chance you will break off a lot of line.  Not only is that expensive for you, now there is a lot of line hanging in the current downstream, helping to guide subsequent presentations to additional snags, or making you think you have a bite every time you go through that part of the run.  If you were using a braid main line you can leave a wire like trap to cut up other folks waders, and your own.  With a swivel tied to your main line and a lighter leader, you likely only lose the shorter leader, which can be pre-tied.   Float is the same as bobber, you just carry extras, but the longer thinner floats work better than the old spherical red and white jobbies.  Go to the Niagara show, you will likely find all this and someone who can talk to you about it there.   Even if they are talking about Center Pinning, the terminal end is set up the same, admittedly with a lot of detail in the shot placement.

  • Thanks 1

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I would be surprised if NYSDEC didn't have some of the print guides with them this weekend.  Or stop at a tackle shop that sells licenses, they should have one.  Nice picture of Rose Gerych, the East end fish head counter until this year, and her daughter, with a steelhead on the cover.

Edited by Lucky13

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I fish a couple inland trout rivers in Eastern PA.  The Lehigh River and the Lackawaxen River.  Both are tributaries of the Delaware and are stocked and hold some year to year leftovers and natives.  My favorite way to fish is to cast Roostertails and Spinner Flies, 4-6lb line on a stiff 7’ spinning rod.  It helps to know how to look for the fast water, pools, are structured holes.  It’s really a good trick to let the current do the work.  I like to add a little action on my retrieve, twitch, twitch, pause and allow the spinner to flutter with a tight line to tease hits from sluggish fish.  
 

I like spinners and lures that have hair or ‘Flies’ attached.  I like to troll using downriggers with these types of spinners as well.  I find that Trout fishing inland lakes is different from the Great Lakes in that the smaller trout like the little stuff.  I wish I had more and larger tributaries in my area.  But then again, in photos, I have seen the Salmon run up those tiny creeks.  

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In line spinners work great for Steelhead, but they have to have a single hook, and you might want a little heavier wire than is normally used.

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