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That makes sense, I have yet to log in since becoming a member.

When I did a Google search I found that one of the states out west bumped the minimum length to 50"!

Edited by Tigerhunter

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I wouldn't worry too much about what someone else does somewhere else...you are catching some awesome fish in some amazing country...you are putting a lot of people on fish too!

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Hey jay.... Have the weeds taken a foothold yet?I bet the water is a little warmer since the last time I went swimming. Lol

I'm looking to come up later during the week once things settle Down a bit, be nice to get out.Off all wk.Probably run into you in the evening.Maybe a half day river run too.

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I used to fish Kayuta lake at my uncles camp as a kid and caught some really nice tigers there.  He brought the photos to a tackle shop and the guy said we should have recorded the measurements since 2 of them looked like lake records. 1 was 31" and the other was 33".  I think that was back in about 1987 or so haha.  Brings back memories.

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FishNY , what kind of rod holders are in your track system?

Gorgeous fish.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G730A using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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That's awesome.  That was 29 years ago so they actually may have been lake records since the stocking I believe only began in the early 80's

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I fish a lake down here that gets tigers stocked every year with a large population of very large fish. Many 40"+ but the bass fishing is incredible with 20"+ largemouths and smallmouths not uncommon.  I caught a 20" smallie on opening night of walleye season this year.  You would think those in charge of stocking would be more educated  and aware of other lakes stocking and success rates.

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Too many lake associations act without understanding or monitoring the results of what they are doing. I have never read anything credible that indicates bass or walleye and other warm water species will do better without tigers or muskies. Maybe if there is limited baitfish. I have read actual case studies that indicate the opposite. There has even been studies that indicate bass and walleye, perch and baitfish doing better where tigers or muskies are stocked. They can have big impact on native trout in a small river and in some lakes.

 

Stopping the tiger stocking may or may not be the reason the bass are running smaller there now. Fishing pressure, tournaments with post release mortality, habitat destruction, early season targeting of bass while they are spawning and/or other unknowns could all be factors.

Edited by muskiedreams

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Despite my conversations with 2 members of the Kayuta Lake Association Board as an aquatic biologist and employee of the DEC, they refused to accept that Tiger Muskys preferred pickerel as a prey source over bass in Kayuta Lake; even ignoring the evidence. Regardless, very large, thick tiger muskys were caught on Kayuta between 2011-2013 by trolling and using large (10 inch) sucker minnows over 5-8 foot SAV beds. Now the few which remain (probably 20-40 based on survival rates and harvesting of the original 500 stocked) would be all in the 42-46 inch range. The best lake now based on stocking rates and square acreage is North Lake in Forestport. Nearly 5000 fish are stocked each year in a lake which is only 307 acres. To put this in perspective, Otisco Lake gets 10,000 each year and is 2100 acres. Unfortunately or fortunately, depending on your point of view, there is a small boat launch and getting more than a 16 foot boat on North Lake is very difficult. There is another lake north of Boonville, Whetstone Reservoir, which is also excellent. Small lake, 10 foot max depth (not counting dam), high stocking rates and fish up to 48 inches. Soft Maple reservoir is also excellent with enormous tigers caught directly below the dam and in the reservoir itself.  Lake Durant is a great fishery with great stocking rates, small lake, 12 foot max depth and nearly 12,000 fish stocked in the last 4 years.

Edited by MuskysAnonymous

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Despite my conversations with 2 members of the Kayuta Lake Association Board as an aquatic biologist and employee of the DEC, they refused to accept that Tiger Muskys preferred pickerel as a prey source over bass in Kayuta Lake; even ignoring the evidence. Regardless, very large, thick tiger muskys were caught on Kayuta between 2011-2013 by trolling and using large (10 inch) sucker minnows over 5-8 foot SAV beds. Now the few which remain (probably 20-40 based on survival rates and harvesting of the original 500 stocked) would be all in the 42-46 inch range. The best lake now based on stocking rates and square acreage is North Lake in Forestport. Nearly 5000 fish are stocked each year in a lake which is only 307 acres. To put this in perspective, Otisco Lake gets 10,000 each year and is 2100 acres. Unfortunately or fortunately, depending on your point of view, there is a small boat launch and getting more than a 16 foot boat on North Lake is very difficult. Regardless, North lake is an excellent Tiger Musky Fishery. There is another lake north of Boonville, Whetstone Reservoir, which is also excellent. Small lake, 10 foot max depth (not counting dam), high stocking rates and fish up to 48 inches.

good info. Thank you

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