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Tank

Funky Chicken

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Had a great day out of Sandy today and this meatball came to play...strange..anyone seen before? The finger was an accident and the fish weighed about 12#'s. Tank

IMG-20120519-00053.jpg

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I think it is this parasite that is found among salmonids...not transferable to humans...WHIRLING DISEASE.

HOPE IT'S OUT OF THE WATER...GUESS IT ACTS AS A RESERVOIR AND AFTER IT DIES IT RELEASES THE PATHOGEN. I didn't know this but I won't put them back in the water if I get one.

Myxobolus cerebralis is a myxosporean parasite of salmonids (salmon, trout, and their allies) that causes whirling disease in farmed salmon and trout and also in wild fish populations. It was first described in rainbow trout in Germany a century ago, but its range has spread and it has appeared in most of Europe (including Russia), the United States, South Africa [1]

and other countries. In the 1980s, M. cerebralis was found to require a tubificid oligochaete (a kind of segmented worm) to complete its life cycle. [2] The parasite infects its hosts with its cells after piercing them with polar filaments ejected from nematocyst-like capsules.

Whirling disease afflicts juvenile fish (fingerlings and fry) and causes skeletal deformation and neurological damage. Fish "whirl" forward in an awkward, corkscrew-like pattern instead of swimming normally, find feeding difficult, and are more vulnerable to predators. The mortality rate is high for fingerlings, up to 90% of infected populations, and those that do survive are deformed by the parasites residing in their cartilage and bone. They act as a reservoir for the parasite, which is released into water following the fish's death. M. cerebralis is one of the most economically important myxozoans in fish, as well as one of the most pathogenic. It was the first myxosporean whose pathology and symptoms were described scientifically. [3]

The parasite is not transmissible to humans.

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that looks soo much like the same fish!! possible?

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I see messed up fish all the time working at a salmon hatchery. I have seen fry that are bent 90 degrees before and they do survive for a while. I wouldn't be surprised if this guy came out of the hatchery like that, as it happens all the time.

Here are a couple of freaks I have pictures of. Seen a lot of cyclops but this was the first triclops.

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This smolt was about half as long as the rest of the others in the round pond, a tiny little football. I have seen this also with browns at the NY hatcheries.

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This crazy three fish, two different species.... Oh man, somebody stop giving them bath salts..

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