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Dipsys for dummies

Alright folks. I've finally got the hang of running my 4 riggers off the boat.  Now looking to learn more methods. I read a lot of reports of fish on dipsys... I guess my first question - with riggers already on the boat is it worth the effort ? Do they present that much differently ? 

 

Now the other questions..... it seems like the more I read on using them properly the more confused I get . Wire, copper , snubbers. Etc  ... well i have two 9' heavy rods equipped with line counter reels, do i have to jump into all this wire and copper or can I use super line like power pro ? 

 

I already have adjustable rod holders that I can lay right flat out the side to clear riggers 

 

in my fishing stuff sickness I have acquired various dipsys from yard sales, with boat purchases, etc... I have a mixture of sizes and colors , and even some of these snap on rings ?  What size is everyone using ? I assume bigger goes deeper with less line ? Does color matter ? Should i treat it like an attractor ? What is the point of the rings ? I assume more depth ? 

 

If you guys think it's worth it.. I'd like to experiment with a cheaper set up untill i get the hang of it ... then possibly invest in better gear for dipsys... I've learned the hard way this hobby is expensive to learn , I've already donated 30lbs of lead to the bottom of ontario.............and one complete pole ....reel......flasher...... and meat rig ... complete with herring .... that was a rough day :thinking:

Edited by JTowne

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For dummies like me , I started with a good real and rod but mono line. I got a good idea out of that set up in the spring then when the fleas showed up it was time to change out the mono and go to wire , tilly-tip and make sure wire is tight or loaded all the time so you do not get a kink in it.....

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Yes, you should add dipsys to your spread. We've had days that our riggers never fired and dipsys took multiple hits. They do present differently, more like a long line with a noisy attractor on the end. I use the magnum size on wire in my spread.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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Absolutely run dipsies, as Luke said some days that's all your bites. I have #1 and mags, run 1's mostly. As others mentioned you only need wire to hold off the flees which show up during the summer heat but I would load wire (1000') on the reels right from the beginning then you have it and it's not expensive and don't forget the Twilli Tip. One thing you want to make sure of is that you have GOOD STURDY Rod holders as these fish hit viscously sometimes, you don't want it pulled from the boat. Don't make guick, sharp turns when pulling dipsies or any wire, make long slow turns. Here's a depth chart to help you out. It may take a little time but you'll be glad you did it. 

image.png

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Over the years I've used Dipseys of various sizes and  just about every type of line possible and by far the best seems to be the stranded wire. Mono stretches and some of it greatly when pulling dipseys. At one time I used only the smaller dipseys on downrigger rods with mono in shallow and still do that in the early Spring or late Fall and they run well close to the bottom in shallow water and are easily controlled just by the speed of the boat when set right. I set them by lowering them to the bottom and then cranking them up a foot or two and I play with the outward settings (1-3) as well. I run light weight flutter spoons when doing this to avoid hanging up on bottom.

For most purposes throughout the season dipseys are best run from wire because it gives the best compromise between achieving depth and warding off the fleas with no stretch so not allowing slack. The wire seems to shed fleas best while braid on  the other hand seems to accrue them like a magnet. Although I have the full range of dipseys on the boat  I prefer the 124 mm Walker now Dreamweaver Deep Divers on 30 lb test 7 strand wire over all others after many years of experimenting., The reason for this is that they achieve the greatest depth  and ratio (sometimes approaching 1 1/2 to 1 depending on setting and speed) and are quite predictable in the way they run. One of the critical things  for the dipseys is before you use them they need to be set right as far as tension on the release or you will be very frustrated by false releases with a whole lot of wire out. This is another reason I prefer the heavier divers on wire becasuse once the tension is set right ( I set it so that it feels a little difficult to release by hand) they release properly even when way out unlike say mono and a smaller lighter  weight on the dipsey where the stretch prevents proper release.

If running multiple dipseys on a side I usually run the one closest to the boat on a 1 setting  as it is one a shorter roller rod while the second one is set to 2 1/2 or three. This avoids tangling with the riggers set at a 45 degree angle at the back. If not running the riggers (and usually sliders on them) I run the closest at 0 to get it good and deep and close to the predicted dive curve. A main concern with dipseys in general and especially running multiples is sharp turns and underwater current. It can be a real problem when fishing solo in a chop without an autopilot:lol: I use the old school method of constantly monitoring the angle of the wires as well as GPS  speed to estimate how things are running as I don't currently have a Fishawk X4D. I am constantly making adjustments in each of the wires up and down to try to entice strikes. I also "work" all my lines (e.g. riggers and boards) while out there and frequently change attractors and flies (types and colors). One of the biggest mistakes I've seen folks make out there and especially with larger fish like salmon is to pump the rod while lowering it extremely to gain on the line and this allows slack from the attractor to the fly and off they go. Any slack in the line is always your enemy in maintaining a constant connection with the fish no matter what the setup. Just keeping a constant steady pressure while letting them take line as necessary is the best recipe for success in getting the fish into the net. i also keep the total length of the dipsey setup within 6 inches of the length of the rod I'm using so I can net the fish without hand lining them as I often fish solo. Safety lines for your rods can also be a good idea especially when fishing on other folks boats with "questionable" rod holders.:lol: Last of all always double check the direction of the dipsey setting because if set the wrong way you'll have an instant mess:)

Edited by Sk8man

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Last of all always double check the direction of the dipsey setting because if set the wrong way you'll have an instant mess

Edited 2 hours ago by Sk8man

I run 2 different sizes off the same side of the boat. I run a # 3 magnum on a 1.5 setting (its heaver and pulls harder) then I run a #1 with ring on a 3.0 setting off the same side.

 

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There's an app. Called dipsy Troller that I use. You plug in you dipsy size, trolling speed, dipsy setting, line your running it on and it will tell you how much line to let out to reach the depth you want to reach.
I've used it for 2 years and it's really close. If I'm in 100 FOW and I use it to get my dipsy down 100 ft I'll be ticking bottom.


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bill - The answer is yes to each setting.....it is a question how much though depending on the speed, currents, which side ofthe boat while turning etc.

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Well after reading all this ... I might as well just order wire and tips and be done with it. Maybe run just the divers for a bit until I get the hang of them .. then add back in the riggers.. I can just see myself getting in a lot of trouble with that many lines....heck just last Sunday a king ran at the boat so fast there was no time to clear anything , he decided he'd do a lap around the other riggers before was finally contained . What a mess. But a fun memory.  This all really is a blast to learn . Especially when it works lol . 

 

I need to dig out my reels and see if I have some that could handle the wire . will report back with a model number , and also a photo of the rod holders im working with 

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The one essential thing as far as the rods go is to have a twilli tip on them or a roller tip to reduce the friction and cutting of the wire on tip and guides.The twillis are only a few bucks and they have adapters for different rod diameters. If you go with a roller tip make sure the side plates on it are steel and not aluminum or they too can cut through.

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I have 2 spare daiwa  47lcb, and 2 okuma Magda pro 30dx . All have line counters ..either of them up to the task ?? 

 

Also here's my rod holders, no markings but sure seem well built , attatched with screws and washer/nuts on backside . 

IMG_1646.JPG

IMG_1647.JPG

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Do not use those rod holders for diver rods.  The king will hit and take the rod with it.  They will spin with enough of a hit.  Don't ask me how I know! 

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The Anglers Pal rod holders are fine for light rods such as toplining and walleye fishing but you could lose a dipsey rod and reel very quickly using them for that. You need heavy duty metal rod holders with a solid base (usually reinforced from the underside of the gunwale). Most folks use rod holders from Burts, Big Jon or Cisco for this purpose as they are made to withstand the constant strain exerted on them as well as the instantaneous whacking by a big king.

 

I would think the Diawa 47LC would be considered "marginal" and should have the drags replaced with carbon fiber washers at the very least if used (Tuna Tom is reasonable) but they would also probably be best used on say the Finger Lakes where there aren't big kings :).

I think capacity wise the Magda Pro 30 might also be marginal for the 1,000 ft of wire required. I have used the 45DX with wire on the Fingers OK but for Lake O use I have the Diawa 57's because they have a 20 lb carbon fiber drag....again related to the king salmon concerns. Both the reels you mention might be used during the early Spring for browns however.

Edited by Sk8man

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11 minutes ago, JTowne said:

lol good to know , any recommendations?

The Big Jon Multi Set rod holders are built like a tank and not that expensive.  I found used ones for around $40.00 each.  

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The fact that they hold up to the tanker lakers Brian catches should be all the proof someone would need:lol:

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30 series reel will hold 1000' of wire, you don't need backing. You heard about the rod holders so I won't say that again. As far as running only dipsies then adding the riggers so you don't tangle, I've been at it for quite some time and 2 weeks ago while running only 2 riggers and 2 dipsies had a king wrap everything plus get into the big engine. We got the fish but had a tangle. If they want to make a mess they will and do it in a hurry. :lol:

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JTowne, as you go forward with the dipsys, you can still run your 2 corner riggers and 1 dipsy per side on a 1.5 or more setting, you should be ok, until you get the hang of it, then add in your boom riggers back into the game. Good luck.


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Luke.. I'm considering getting rid of the corner riggers with the fixed mounts and short booms.. and putting my swivel mount long

booms back there . It's really a pain in the butt setting them back riggers on my boat .. you've breifly seen it .. you basically have to lay on your belly and reach out over the back .  I'm thinking with the long booms on swivels on the corners I could swivel them to the side .. set up and swing them out the back ... So my question .. is there any reason to not run the long booms off the back? Or should I just leave the short ones there ? I appreciate your feedback . You haven't steered me wrong .. i purchased those three spoons you showed me and one or more of them has produced every trip so far 

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I think that's a good idea. I only run two corner riggers on my boat. If your set up will be easier and maybe a little quicker, then I think it would help a lot. Then run your dipsys out the sides and your still running the same number of rods, with different presentations for the fish.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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